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Radioactive Iodine

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SCIENCE
April 1, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Radiation levels increased sharply inside and outside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant Thursday, slowing work on the devastated facility again and once more throwing into doubt the integrity of the containment vessels that hold the fuel rods. Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials said the level of radioactive iodine in water at the plant hit levels 10,000 times the permissible limit, preventing workers from getting near the water, which accumulated during early efforts to prevent a full-fledged meltdown by flooding the plant.
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WORLD
April 6, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
The operator of Japan's stricken nuclear plant said Wednesday that it had apparently contained at least one leak that was allowing radiation to seep into the sea. Tokyo Electric Power Co. had said Tuesday that it had found iodine-131 at 7.5 million times the legal limit in a seawater sample taken near the facility, and government officials instituted a health limit for radioactivity in fish. Other samples were found to contain radioactive cesium at 1.1 million times the legal limit.
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WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Radiation found in batches of milk and spinach near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was suspected to exceed safety levels, Japan's top government spokesman said Saturday. If confirmed, the discovery would mark the first time the fallout from the nuclear crisis may have affected Japan's food supply. The Kyodo News Agency also reported late Saturday that traces of radioactive iodine were found in tap water in Tokyo and other parts of the country. Photos: Japan grapples with crisis Health officials administered tests on milk from Fukushima prefecture and spinach from neighboring Ibaraki prefecture.
WORLD
April 5, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant began releasing thousands of tons of radioactive water into the sea Monday evening under an emergency measure approved by the government to make room in storage tanks for far more severely contaminated water. About 10,000 tons of the water to be released was being taken from a communal storage facility near the No. 4 reactor. Another 1,500 tons was being released from near the No. 5 and 6 reactors — which have faced fewer problems than the other reactors.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Potassium iodide supplements are flying off drug-store shelves in the United States, according to a number of reports. There are two reasons why this is not a good thing. One, experts have repeatedly reassured Americans that any radiation from the leaking nuclear reactors in Japan will not be a threat in this country. The radiation will dissipate as it traverses the Pacific Ocean. Buying it is a waste of money. Two, taking potassium iodide tablets without just cause can be risky for some people, health experts warned Wednesday.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | Reuters
Radioactive gases leaked from a Russian nuclear reactor early today, and an official described the accident as serious. Yuri Rogozhin, spokesman for the state nuclear inspectorate Gosatomnadzor, said: "The degree of the incident is serious, with possible consequences for the environment and the population." He said radioactive iodine had leaked from the plant at Sosnovy Bor, 60 miles from St. Petersburg.
SPORTS
August 9, 1992 | JONATHON BOR, BALTIMORE SUN
Although heartened by Gail Devers' gold-medal comeback in the women's 100-meter race, physicians specializing in thyroid conditions say they are perplexed and disturbed by her account of her battle against Graves' disease. Some of the pieces, they say, just don't compute. In particular, they say it is virtually impossible that the radioactive iodine she took to quell her overactive thyroid caused her feet to become so swollen and inflamed that doctors considered cutting them off.
NEWS
April 23, 1987
One year after the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the reactor's temperature hovers near the boiling point, radioactive contamination of the area's soil remains higher than normal and 13 badly burned people are still invalids, Soviet officials said. However, most people in the area are in good health, and milk supplies, at first found to contain radioactive iodine, are now safe, the officials added.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Federal and independent radiation health specialists Tuesday disputed a claim by Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) that 30,000 children in eastern Washington state may have been exposed to more radioactive iodine from the government's Hanford nuclear weapons plant in the 1940s and '50s than Soviets living near the Chernobyl accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1992
In response to "A Nuclear Nightmare" series, Sept. 2-4: Few people understand that the problems with nuclear pollution in the U.S. are of a magnitude comparable to that in the Soviet Union. From 1944-1954 Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford plant discharged over 500,000 curies of radioactive iodine into the atmosphere, and kept it a secret until 1986. Because of the secrecy and lack of precautions being taken, preliminary estimates of the doses received by the unsuspecting population of eastern Washington state are higher than the doses received by those proximate to Chernobyl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Traces of radioactive iodine have been found in milk from San Luis Obispo, but officials say the amounts are so small that they pose no risk. "People need to realize that really trace amounts do not pose a threat to public health," said Mike Sicilia, a spokesman for the California Department of Public Health. "The levels we detected are nearly 5,000 times less than FDA standards. " The radioactive material is iodine-131, which is produced by nuclear fission. It hadn't been found in California milk samples before fallout from Japan's ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant drifted across the Pacific.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Radiation levels increased sharply inside and outside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant Thursday, slowing work on the devastated facility again and once more throwing into doubt the integrity of the containment vessels that hold the fuel rods. Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials said the level of radioactive iodine in water at the plant hit levels 10,000 times the permissible limit, preventing workers from getting near the water, which accumulated during early efforts to prevent a full-fledged meltdown by flooding the plant.
WORLD
March 24, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Parents in Tokyo and five surrounding cities scrambled for bottled water Thursday after the government warned that infants should not be allowed to consume tap water because elevated levels of radioactive iodine from a crippled nuclear plant were detected at a water treatment plant. Water tests in Tokyo found levels of radioactive iodine-131 about double the level deemed safe for infants under the age of 1. The levels were below the unsafe benchmark for adults. In parts of Fukushima prefecture, where the nuclear plant is located, radiation levels exceeded both thresholds.
WORLD
March 23, 2011 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Tokyo -- Infants in Tokyo and five surrounding cities should not be allowed to consume tap water, the city's government said Wednesday after elevated levels of radioactive iodine from a crippled nuclear plant were detected at a water treatment plant. Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan urged consumers not to eat a dozen types of contaminated vegetables from the region surrounding the nuclear facility 150 miles northeast of the capital and also expanded a shipment ban. Water tests in Tokyo found levels of radioactive iodine 131 at 210 becquerels per liter Tuesday and 190 becquerels per liter on Wednesday morning, about double the level of 100 becquerels per liter deemed safe for children under the age of 1. A level of 300 becquerels per liter is considered safe for adults.
HEALTH
March 21, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
I live 3,000 miles away from Los Angeles, yet I've received several phone calls in the last week from patients seeking prescriptions for potassium iodide. Even in New York City, where I practice, pharmacies are selling out of these pills. It's all in response to the ominous reports from Japan, where a stricken nuclear power plant in Fukushima has been emitting radiation since weathering the twin assaults of a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and a devastating tsunami. U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin's endorsement of the idea that the public should stock up on the pills as a "precaution" only provoked more fear.
WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Six workers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have been exposed to radiation beyond the previous limit for an emergency operation, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Saturday. Kyodo News reported the employees, whose job titles were not known, were continuing to work despite having been exposed to more than 100 millisieverts of radiation. The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry raised the exposure limit to 250 millisieverts for the current nuclear crisis. The power company said the workers have shown no abnormal signs from exposure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992
Your article (Aug. 2) about Gail Devers contains misleading statements about Graves' disease, a condition that affects many people. The overactive thyroid of Graves' disease does not cause the "skin to peel" or the feet to become "swollen and bloody," as stated. The therapeutic doses of radioactive iodine given for Graves' disease are not "massive"; they do not cause significant pain in the neck (as was stated in another Times article about Devers several weeks ago) and do not leave the patient "weakened and nauseated."
WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Six workers at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have been exposed to radiation beyond the previous limit for an emergency operation, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Saturday. Kyodo News reported the employees, whose job titles were not known, were continuing to work despite having been exposed to more than 100 millisieverts of radiation. The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry raised the exposure limit to 250 millisieverts for the current nuclear crisis. The power company said the workers have shown no abnormal signs from exposure.
WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Radiation found in batches of milk and spinach near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was suspected to exceed safety levels, Japan's top government spokesman said Saturday. If confirmed, the discovery would mark the first time the fallout from the nuclear crisis may have affected Japan's food supply. The Kyodo News Agency also reported late Saturday that traces of radioactive iodine were found in tap water in Tokyo and other parts of the country. Photos: Japan grapples with crisis Health officials administered tests on milk from Fukushima prefecture and spinach from neighboring Ibaraki prefecture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Within days, nuclear radiation released from Japan's damaged Fukushima reactors could reach California, but experts say the amount that makes its way across the ocean should pose no danger. "What we're being told is that there is no threat to California at this time," said Mike Sicilia, a spokesman for the California Department of Public Health. "It's a matter of distance. Dangerous radioactivity could not cross the 5,000 miles of the Pacific without petering out. " The reassurances came as California and federal health officials opened hotlines to field questions about possible radiation risks.
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