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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A two-year internal audit of spending by UCLA's department of radiological sciences has found that the university was duped into paying two employment agencies for temporary workers who could not have performed the jobs listed for them. Among other things, UCLA auditors found that the university was billed for specialized work supposedly completed by seven teen-agers, including a 13-year-old who was listed on pay sheets as a $26-an-hour radiological technical assistant. The audit, initiated by UCLA in October, 1992, and completed this month, also found that employment agencies listed spouses, siblings and children of UCLA employees as specialized workers and billed for their time--apparently without them knowing it. According to auditors, the agencies overbilled the university and diverted money to the employment agencies, filing false invoices and collecting for services that may never have been performed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997
Re State Assemblywoman Debra Bowen's March 25 letter: Had Bowen read the National Academy of Sciences' 1995 report on Ward Valley, she would have learned that a respected scientific panel unanimously concluded that the site would pose no threat to Colorado River water quality. This is true for even long-lived wastes, let alone tritium, which has a half-life of only 12.3 years and will naturally decay long before the Colorado River could possibly be affected. As chair of the Assembly Natural Resources Committee, Bowen has a responsibility to get the facts before adopting the bogus technical arguments of nonscientists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989
Although flattered by the reference, I must point out that the devices used to add spark to Universal's new thrill ride ("Shaking Up the Tourists With a Jolt of 'Reality,' " Feb. 19) are Tesla, not Tessler, coils. FRANKLIN TESSLER MD Assistant Professor of Radiological Sciences UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A two-year internal audit of spending by UCLA's department of radiological sciences has found that the university was duped into paying two employment agencies for temporary workers who could not have performed the jobs listed for them. Among other things, UCLA auditors found that the university was billed for specialized work supposedly completed by seven teen-agers, including a 13-year-old who was listed on pay sheets as a $26-an-hour radiological technical assistant. The audit, initiated by UCLA in October, 1992, and completed this month, also found that employment agencies listed spouses, siblings and children of UCLA employees as specialized workers and billed for their time--apparently without them knowing it. According to auditors, the agencies overbilled the university and diverted money to the employment agencies, filing false invoices and collecting for services that may never have been performed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1990
We are concerned that your article "Concerns Over New Ovarian Cancer Test," (May 1) may leave readers with the false impression that we seldom use transvaginal ultrasound. Transvaginal ultrasound has been available in the UCLA Department of Radiological Sciences since 1986. Multiple studies, including our own, have shown it to be an excellent technique capable of detecting very small abnormalities. We strongly feel that transvaginal ultrasound is the best way to evaluate the pelvis with ultrasound.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI and internal auditors at UCLA are investigating allegations that an employee in the department of radiological sciences embezzled funds by using outside companies to bill the UCLA Medical Center for services that were never performed, sources told The Times on Monday. UCLA issued a statement to The Times acknowledging an ongoing probe into "possible financial irregularities" but gave no details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997
Re State Assemblywoman Debra Bowen's March 25 letter: Had Bowen read the National Academy of Sciences' 1995 report on Ward Valley, she would have learned that a respected scientific panel unanimously concluded that the site would pose no threat to Colorado River water quality. This is true for even long-lived wastes, let alone tritium, which has a half-life of only 12.3 years and will naturally decay long before the Colorado River could possibly be affected. As chair of the Assembly Natural Resources Committee, Bowen has a responsibility to get the facts before adopting the bogus technical arguments of nonscientists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990
Staff writer Edwin Chen's article (Part A, Feb. 28) on the runaway costs of medical technology incorrectly implies that the expensive lithotripter machines are successful for only 10% to 25% of patients with gallstones, and that the treatment caused disturbing side effects such as blood in the urine and high blood pressure. For patients with one or two stones, European studies have shown a success rate of nearly 90%, but only 15% to 20% of patients suffering from this disease have this number of stones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1994 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA announced Wednesday that it will fire a top administrator in its department of radiological sciences for approving at least $1.2 million in "inappropriate" and excessive payments to temporary employment registries with which he had hidden business ties. Officials said an internal audit, which has been conducted with the FBI, revealed that James G.
NEWS
March 5, 1992
The Iris Cantor Chair in Breast Imaging has been established at the UCLA School of Medicine with an endowment of $700,000. The Cantor Chair will be funded by a gift of $350,000 from the Iris and Gerald Cantor Foundation in addition to matching funds from the school's department of radiological sciences. The chair was established to promote excellence in clinical research and education focusing on breast imaging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1994 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA announced Wednesday that it will fire a top administrator in its department of radiological sciences for approving at least $1.2 million in "inappropriate" and excessive payments to temporary employment registries with which he had hidden business ties. Officials said an internal audit, which has been conducted with the FBI, revealed that James G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI and internal auditors at UCLA are investigating allegations that an employee in the department of radiological sciences embezzled funds by using outside companies to bill the UCLA Medical Center for services that were never performed, sources told The Times on Monday. UCLA issued a statement to The Times acknowledging an ongoing probe into "possible financial irregularities" but gave no details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1990
We are concerned that your article "Concerns Over New Ovarian Cancer Test," (May 1) may leave readers with the false impression that we seldom use transvaginal ultrasound. Transvaginal ultrasound has been available in the UCLA Department of Radiological Sciences since 1986. Multiple studies, including our own, have shown it to be an excellent technique capable of detecting very small abnormalities. We strongly feel that transvaginal ultrasound is the best way to evaluate the pelvis with ultrasound.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990
Staff writer Edwin Chen's article (Part A, Feb. 28) on the runaway costs of medical technology incorrectly implies that the expensive lithotripter machines are successful for only 10% to 25% of patients with gallstones, and that the treatment caused disturbing side effects such as blood in the urine and high blood pressure. For patients with one or two stones, European studies have shown a success rate of nearly 90%, but only 15% to 20% of patients suffering from this disease have this number of stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989
Although flattered by the reference, I must point out that the devices used to add spark to Universal's new thrill ride ("Shaking Up the Tourists With a Jolt of 'Reality,' " Feb. 19) are Tesla, not Tessler, coils. FRANKLIN TESSLER MD Assistant Professor of Radiological Sciences UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998 | BY MIMI KO CRUZ and JOHN CANALIS and LIZ SEYMOUR and LISA ADDISON
Zang-Hee Cho, UC Irvine professor of radiological sciences, has been elected as a foreign associate to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Foreign associates at the institute are scientists who are citizens of foreign countries. Cho, a native of Korea, is a pioneer of two of the most widely used medical diagnostic tools in the world: Positron Emission Topography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.
NEWS
May 21, 1987
Five UCLA professors have received $1,000 Distinguished Teaching Awards in ceremonies sposored by the UCLA Alumni Assn. The professors are Lawrence W. Bassett, radiological sciences; E. Bradford Burns, history; Kenneth W. Graham Jr., law; Howard Suber, theater, film and television, and Richard A. Yarborough, English. Awards of $740 were given to teaching assistants Mary Docter, Karin Hamm-Ehsani, Linda Long, Peter Antony Master and John Quackenbush.
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