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Radislav Krstic

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NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Bosnian Serb general accused of masterminding the 1995 massacre of thousands of Muslim civilians pleaded not guilty Monday to genocide and crimes against humanity. Gen. Radislav Krstic, the top Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect in U.N. custody, commanded Bosnian Serb troops who carried out the killings in the U.N.-protected "safe haven" of Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia.
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NEWS
March 13, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From aerial spy photos, from cadavers dug out of mass graves with blindfolds still on their faces and rope binding their hands, the silent victims have been crying for justice for almost five years. And today, a 51-year-old professional soldier who lost his right foot to a land mine is to go on trial for the most concentrated act of bloodletting in Europe in more than half a century. Maj. Gen.
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NEWS
December 3, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO troops on Wednesday made their biggest move yet against Balkan war crimes suspects, arresting a commander of a Bosnian Serb unit accused of massacring several thousand Muslims. In the summer of 1995, Gen. Radislav Krstic helped lead the notorious Drina Corps into the U.N. "safe haven" of Srebrenica, where more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys disappeared after the enclave was overrun. The Srebrenica massacre has been called the worst atrocity in Europe since World War II.
NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Bosnian Serb general accused of masterminding the 1995 massacre of thousands of Muslim civilians pleaded not guilty Monday to genocide and crimes against humanity. Gen. Radislav Krstic, the top Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect in U.N. custody, commanded Bosnian Serb troops who carried out the killings in the U.N.-protected "safe haven" of Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia.
NEWS
March 13, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From aerial spy photos, from cadavers dug out of mass graves with blindfolds still on their faces and rope binding their hands, the silent victims have been crying for justice for almost five years. And today, a 51-year-old professional soldier who lost his right foot to a land mine is to go on trial for the most concentrated act of bloodletting in Europe in more than half a century. Maj. Gen.
WORLD
April 20, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. war crimes tribunal at The Hague reduced the sentence of a Bosnian Serb general by 11 years and said he was not guilty of genocide but of "aiding and abetting genocide." Gen. Radislav Krstic will now serve 35 years in prison, the appeals court ruled. But it rejected a defense argument that the killing of about 7,500 men and boys, mostly Muslims, in the U.N.-protected zone of Srebrenica in 1995 fell short of the worst of all crimes.
WORLD
August 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
The U.N. war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia imposed its harshest punishment to date Thursday, sentencing a Bosnian Serb politician to life in prison for exterminating or deporting thousands of Muslims and Croats in 1992. Though acquitted of genocide, Milomir Stakic was convicted of being a leading figure in a campaign of persecution "to achieve the vision of a pure Serbian state," according to a summary of the verdict read in court.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Bosnian Serb army officer surrendered to a U.N. war crimes tribunal Wednesday to face charges of murder and persecution of Muslims while serving near the eastern town of Srebrenica in 1995. Lt. Col. Dragan Jokic turned himself in at the court's office in the Bosnian town of Banja Luka and was flown to the Netherlands, where he has been accused of four counts of crimes against humanity and violations of the laws and customs of war during Bosnia-Herzegovina's 3 1/2-year war.
NEWS
September 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Slobodan Milosevic defied U.N. prosecutors Friday, contending the massacre of Muslims in eastern Bosnia of which he is accused was devised by French spies and carried out by renegade Serb paramilitaries. The former Yugoslav president, charged with 66 counts of war crimes from 1991-1995, including genocide, also dismissed the testimony from the prosecution's first Croatian Serb witness -- who accused the Milosevic-bankrolled nationalist Serb forces of ethnic bloodletting.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Bosnian Serb army officer pleaded not guilty Tuesday at the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal to charges of murdering Muslims in a U.N.-declared "safe area" in 1995. Lt. Col. Dragan Jokic is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity and violations of the laws and customs of war in the July 1995 massacre of Muslim men and boys in the town of Srebrenica. He was stationed near the U.N. enclave during the 3 1/2-year war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Jokic, 44, has been held at the U.N.
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO troops on Wednesday made their biggest move yet against Balkan war crimes suspects, arresting a commander of a Bosnian Serb unit accused of massacring several thousand Muslims. In the summer of 1995, Gen. Radislav Krstic helped lead the notorious Drina Corps into the U.N. "safe haven" of Srebrenica, where more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys disappeared after the enclave was overrun. The Srebrenica massacre has been called the worst atrocity in Europe since World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998
The Balkans are a region whose people do not forget. Wrongs are chronicled through the generations. Just the mention of a name can evoke the bitterest of memories. Srebrenica is one of those names that will be so remembered. The arrest by American troops of Bosnian Serb Gen. Radislav Krstic on Wednesday has brought the horrors of Srebrenica back into focus.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Bosnian Serb general on trial for genocide testified Wednesday that his superiors wanted to cover up the murder of thousands of Muslims and threatened his family in order to keep him quiet. Gen. Radislav Krstic told the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia that he knew about mass executions by Serbian forces in July 1995 at the Muslim enclave of Srebrenica but did not investigate them. "I learned about those events and did not take any measures," Krstic said.
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