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NEWS
August 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal scientists have found unsafe levels of cancer-causing radium in the major source for drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people in southern New Jersey, the Philadelphia Inquirer has reported. An eight-year study by the U.S. Geological survey found 33% of the private wells tested between 1989 and 1996 in six southern New Jersey counties had unsafe levels of radium.
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SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
In schoolbook drawings, nuclei -- the protons and neutrons at the center of atoms -- are often represented as neat, spherical little bunches with nice round electron clouds circling about them. Many nuclei are, in fact, sphere-shaped, but some are not: Relationships between their constituent parts deform them into bundles shaped more like a football or a discus. And physicists have predicted that in some cases, atomic nuclei could take on even more unusual shapes: pyramids, bananas, pears.
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HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | By Rosie Mestel
This morning I conducted a phrenology test on my cat. The cat was on my chest; I absently started to stroke her, noting the bumps and indentations in her skull. And then I remembered the book I'd been reading the night before: "Quack!" by Bob McCoy (Santa Monica Press, due out this month). The 235-page book is filled with some of the most crackpot medical theories and devices charlatans have come up with and gotten rich from. I'd been enthralled by descriptions of Dr.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | BRIAN SKOLOFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ben Fruehauf is worried. His livelihood as a canoe outfitter depends on the Buffalo National River, a majestic, free-flowing watercourse rich with 59 species of fish and flanked by caves tucked deep inside towering limestone bluffs. He doesn't want anyone altering the water flow. It is already fickle enough. Fruehauf lives in Searcy County, nestled in the heart of the Ozarks and home to about 8,200 people spread over 664 square miles of rolling hills and pastures.
SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
In schoolbook drawings, nuclei -- the protons and neutrons at the center of atoms -- are often represented as neat, spherical little bunches with nice round electron clouds circling about them. Many nuclei are, in fact, sphere-shaped, but some are not: Relationships between their constituent parts deform them into bundles shaped more like a football or a discus. And physicists have predicted that in some cases, atomic nuclei could take on even more unusual shapes: pyramids, bananas, pears.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | BRIAN SKOLOFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ben Fruehauf is worried. His livelihood as a canoe outfitter depends on the Buffalo National River, a majestic, free-flowing watercourse rich with 59 species of fish and flanked by caves tucked deep inside towering limestone bluffs. He doesn't want anyone altering the water flow. It is already fickle enough. Fruehauf lives in Searcy County, nestled in the heart of the Ozarks and home to about 8,200 people spread over 664 square miles of rolling hills and pastures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Police officials Thursday alerted law enforcement agencies in five western states to be on the lookout for a stolen pickup truck bearing a small steel box that contains potentially lethal radioactive material used to make industrial X-rays. The truck, a tan 4-wheel-drive 1985 GMC with Wyoming license 2/3 5692, and a camper shell on the back, was stolen last weekend from a parking lot outside an Oceanside firm, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Carole Langer's "Radium City" (opening today for weekend showings at Laemmle's Monica) is a brave, compassionate documentary. But it's also a great American horror story: Its events and ramifications would have beggared the imaginations of Poe, Lovecraft or Stephen King. Langer tells her appalling story--the 60-year chronicle of a city poisoned by one of its industries--in a tone of immense sobriety and reticence.
NEWS
October 4, 1998 | MARTHA IRVINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The year was 1923, a giddy time for a small-town teenager who had no money for college but found herself able to buy silk dresses and high-heeled shoes. Margaret Looney, a soft-spoken redhead known as Peg, was fresh out of high school when she and dozens of other young women were hired to paint glow-in-the-dark watch dials at the newly arrived Radium Dial Co. It was no easy task to trace the tiny numbers on the watches, made popular by their use in World War I.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police seized canisters of radioactive material, a cache of weapons and anti-government "freemen" literature from a house in Bellport, N.Y., Thursday, after arresting two men and charging them in a bizarre plot to kill local politicians and an investigator. According to detectives, the plan was to contaminate the victims with radium.
HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | By Rosie Mestel
This morning I conducted a phrenology test on my cat. The cat was on my chest; I absently started to stroke her, noting the bumps and indentations in her skull. And then I remembered the book I'd been reading the night before: "Quack!" by Bob McCoy (Santa Monica Press, due out this month). The 235-page book is filled with some of the most crackpot medical theories and devices charlatans have come up with and gotten rich from. I'd been enthralled by descriptions of Dr.
NEWS
October 4, 1998 | MARTHA IRVINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The year was 1923, a giddy time for a small-town teenager who had no money for college but found herself able to buy silk dresses and high-heeled shoes. Margaret Looney, a soft-spoken redhead known as Peg, was fresh out of high school when she and dozens of other young women were hired to paint glow-in-the-dark watch dials at the newly arrived Radium Dial Co. It was no easy task to trace the tiny numbers on the watches, made popular by their use in World War I.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal scientists have found unsafe levels of cancer-causing radium in the major source for drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people in southern New Jersey, the Philadelphia Inquirer has reported. An eight-year study by the U.S. Geological survey found 33% of the private wells tested between 1989 and 1996 in six southern New Jersey counties had unsafe levels of radium.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police seized canisters of radioactive material, a cache of weapons and anti-government "freemen" literature from a house in Bellport, N.Y., Thursday, after arresting two men and charging them in a bizarre plot to kill local politicians and an investigator. According to detectives, the plan was to contaminate the victims with radium.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Carole Langer's "Radium City" (opening today for weekend showings at Laemmle's Monica) is a brave, compassionate documentary. But it's also a great American horror story: Its events and ramifications would have beggared the imaginations of Poe, Lovecraft or Stephen King. Langer tells her appalling story--the 60-year chronicle of a city poisoned by one of its industries--in a tone of immense sobriety and reticence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Police officials Thursday alerted law enforcement agencies in five western states to be on the lookout for a stolen pickup truck bearing a small steel box that contains potentially lethal radioactive material used to make industrial X-rays. The truck, a tan 4-wheel-drive 1985 GMC with Wyoming license 2/3 5692, and a camper shell on the back, was stolen last weekend from a parking lot outside an Oceanside firm, police said.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2009 | Don Lee and Alana Semuels
The final years of the U.S. housing boom and a disastrous series of Gulf Coast hurricanes created a golden opportunity for Chinese drywall manufacturers. With domestic suppliers unable to keep up with demand, imports of Chinese drywall to the U.S. jumped 17-fold in 2006 from the year before. That imported drywall is now at the center of complaints of foul odors seeping from walls.
NEWS
December 3, 1987
The House voted overwhelmingly to spend $14 million to help small towns reduce levels of cancer-causing radium in their drinking water supplies. The plan was approved as an amendment to a bill appropriating $492 million over three years for research into ground water contamination. House members voted 399 to 15 in favor of the research bill after agreeing unanimously to the radium-assistance amendment sponsored by Rep. Dennis J. Hastert (R-Ill.).
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