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Radon

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NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Environmental Protection Agency urged school officials today to test all school buildings for radon, saying preliminary tests from 16 states show many schools have unhealthy levels of the cancer-causing gas. EPA Administrator William K. Reilly said that although the test results are only preliminary, the levels found are high enough to warrant nationwide testing of school buildings. "It is important that school administrators nationwide understand both the seriousness of the risk and the relative simplicity of testing and fixing the problem," Reilly said.
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SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
In schoolbook drawings, nuclei -- the protons and neutrons at the center of atoms -- are often represented as neat, spherical little bunches with nice round electron clouds circling about them. Many nuclei are, in fact, sphere-shaped, but some are not: Relationships between their constituent parts deform them into bundles shaped more like a football or a discus. And physicists have predicted that in some cases, atomic nuclei could take on even more unusual shapes: pyramids, bananas, pears.
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NEWS
April 23, 1989 | From National Geographic
Radiation. Few words in any language generate more anxiety. Used with names such as Hiroshima, Three Mile Island or Chernobyl, it produces an even more frightening fallout. Yet, applied with human ingenuity, radiation can destroy malignant cells in a tumor, sterilize medical products and foodstuffs, track the progress of a medicine through the body with radioisotopes, date archeological and geologic events and turn water into steam for electric power. Soon, radiation may be used to detect plastic explosives in suitcases.
HEALTH
October 11, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Radon ? an odorless, colorless gas that seeps from uranium in the soil ? accounts for more than half of the ionizing radiation most people encounter in their lives. When inhaled, this radioactive gas can set the stage for lung cancer. Much as researchers use atomic blasts to estimate the risks of CT scans and X-rays, they use cancer rates of uranium miners to calculate the toll from radon. Although nobody's basement has as much radon as a uranium mine, it's estimated that 20,000 Americans die of lung cancer from radon exposure each year, says R. William Field, a professor of occupational and environmental health at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | APRIL JACKSON
Radon is an odorless, colorless radioactive gas occurring naturally in the earth's rock and soil. It is the product of decaying soils and rocks associated with high levels of uranium including granite, phosphate, shale and pitchblende. As radon decays, it produces heavy radioactive byproducts called "progeny" that cling to dust and smoke. When inhaled, progeny continues to decay inside the lungs, which can lead to lung cancer.
NEWS
June 3, 1988
Unhealthy levels of radioactive radon gas have been found in buildings at the Air Force Academy and two U.S. air bases, the Air Force said. Radon is a colorless, odorless natural gas that seeps into buildings from decaying uranium in the soil. Scientists say inhaled radon may increase the risk of lung cancer. Results of an Air Force sampling of soil for radon gas showed that in addition to the Colorado academy, buildings at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1993
I'm pleased the Environmental Protection Agency has formally declared that secondary cigarette smoke is a potent carcinogen in a class with radon, asbestos and other established cancer-causing agents (Jan. 6). But I'm wondering, in light of this new report, if the smokers rights people will still oppose smoking bans in the workplace, public facilities and restaurants. I certainly hope not. I can't imagine them saying people should similarly have the right to wear asbestos or spray radon gas in public places.
REAL ESTATE
November 17, 1985
Your article on toxic waste (Nov. 3) was interesting but a bit too vague. Specifically, I was amazed to see that opening windows is considered a cure for the asbestos problem. All this does is move the carcinogen from indoors to outdoors, which creates a health hazard for untold numbers of innocent bystanders. Just like radon gas or radioactive clouds from reactor accidents, they remain deadly, no matter what The Times says. ROBERT BEREND Beverly Hills
SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
In schoolbook drawings, nuclei -- the protons and neutrons at the center of atoms -- are often represented as neat, spherical little bunches with nice round electron clouds circling about them. Many nuclei are, in fact, sphere-shaped, but some are not: Relationships between their constituent parts deform them into bundles shaped more like a football or a discus. And physicists have predicted that in some cases, atomic nuclei could take on even more unusual shapes: pyramids, bananas, pears.
HEALTH
July 27, 2009 | Karen Ravn
Good ventilation is probably the single most important step you can take toward making your home healthier, experts say. For the most part, the air you breathe while you're at home isn't nearly as clean as the air you breathe while you're outside (even if the outdoor air is fairly smoggy). Even if you don't notice any ill effects right now, it's a good idea to try to clean up the air in your home, says Robert Phalen, founder of the Air Pollution Health Effects Laboratory at UC Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
More than a week ago, a scientist little known in earthquake circles made a bold prediction of a destructive earthquake in the Abruzzo region of central Italy based on spikes in radon gas. Giampaolo Giuliani went so far as to tell the mayor of a town there that it would strike within the next 24 hours. His deadline passed and for days, nothing happened. Then, early Monday, a magnitude-6.
NEWS
November 21, 2004 | Eric Talmadge, Associated Press Writer
It has been singled out as the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, right behind smoking. But to Shiro Umeda, sprightly at 74, radon is the best thing since aspirin. Every month for the last 10 years, he has come to a radon bath here to soak it up and breathe it in. He's convinced that it has helped ease his back pain and improve his overall health.
REAL ESTATE
June 24, 2001 | MORRIS CAREY and JAMES CAREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I have cracks in my concrete basement floor from which I believe radon gas is creeping in. What is the best way to seal those cracks? Answer: Before you do anything about that cracked floor, test for radon first. Better yet, have a professional make the test for you. The reason for contacting a professional: You might need to install a system to exhaust the vapors if the radon is present in a dangerous concentration.
HEALTH
March 13, 2000 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Like all physicians, we learned about radon, an odorless gas that has been linked to lung cancer. However, it wasn't until one of us tried to purchase a house--and the inspection revealed elevated radon levels--that the issue struck home. Radon gas is produced by the decay of uranium, an element almost universally present in soil and rock. Radon moves slowly through ground soil and can enter homes through openings or cracks in the foundations and construction joints.
REAL ESTATE
July 18, 1999 | BARRY STONE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: Our home was recently found to contain unsafe levels of radon gas. In fact, the people who had offered to buy our home canceled the purchase when they received the test results. Now we're wondering how we can sell our home. Who will want to buy it when they learn about radioactive contamination in the air? Is there anything we can do to eliminate the problem? Answer: Please don't lose heart.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Energy has agreed to pay a $100,000 fine levied by the Environmental Protection Agency for failing to meet timetables and formal commitments to clean up a nuclear weapons plant contaminated by uranium and toxic byproducts. Sources said that the precedent-setting agreement, expected to be announced early next week, will require the federal government to spend an additional $150,000 for environmental projects in the vicinity of Fernald, Ohio, where the plant is located.
HEALTH
July 27, 2009 | Karen Ravn
Good ventilation is probably the single most important step you can take toward making your home healthier, experts say. For the most part, the air you breathe while you're at home isn't nearly as clean as the air you breathe while you're outside (even if the outdoor air is fairly smoggy). Even if you don't notice any ill effects right now, it's a good idea to try to clean up the air in your home, says Robert Phalen, founder of the Air Pollution Health Effects Laboratory at UC Irvine.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state health department survey that languished for a year before being released Tuesday estimates that about 5% of California's elementary school classrooms have significant concentrations of radon, an odorless and invisible cancer-causing gas. The state Department of Health Services report, dated May 1998, is based on a sampling of 378 of California's 5,400 elementary schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1998 | TONY LYSTRA
After discovering low levels of radon at Simi Elementary School last spring, school officials are embarking on a plan to remove the potentially dangerous gas from several rooms. In March, a student's science project detected the radioactive gas, which is found in rock and soil and can cause damage to lung tissue and even lung cancer if its byproducts are inhaled.
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