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Radon Gas

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HOME & GARDEN
April 23, 1994 | FRANK ROYLANCE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The bright orange Fiesta dishware that many Americans use and collect could be giving off enough radon gas to pose a significant health risk, a geologist says. "When we test homes and look for radon, we always suppose it comes from the ground," said Rudolph Hon of Boston College. "Maybe we need to make the public aware that some of it can be coming from the cabinet."
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HEALTH
October 11, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You may not realize it, but your life is radioactive. If you've eaten a banana lately, potassium-40 atoms in your body are shooting out thousands of particles every second. And if you're anywhere near solid ground, you can assume that radon gas is pelting you with gamma rays. With X-rays at the dental office, radon in the basement and cosmic rays beaming down from space, we're literally surrounded by radioactivity and high-powered radiation. Invisible, exotic and — as nuclear weapons have so clearly demonstrated — potentially lethal, radiation seems perfectly suited to inspire fear, says Jerrold Bushberg, clinical professor of radiology and radiation oncology at the UC Davis School of Medicine.
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REAL ESTATE
July 18, 1999 | BARRY STONE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: Our home was recently found to contain unsafe levels of radon gas. In fact, the people who had offered to buy our home canceled the purchase when they received the test results. Now we're wondering how we can sell our home. Who will want to buy it when they learn about radioactive contamination in the air? Is there anything we can do to eliminate the problem? Answer: Please don't lose heart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
More than a week ago, a scientist little known in earthquake circles made a bold prediction of a destructive earthquake in the Abruzzo region of central Italy based on spikes in radon gas. Giampaolo Giuliani went so far as to tell the mayor of a town there that it would strike within the next 24 hours. His deadline passed and for days, nothing happened. Then, early Monday, a magnitude-6.
REAL ESTATE
June 24, 2001 | MORRIS CAREY and JAMES CAREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I have cracks in my concrete basement floor from which I believe radon gas is creeping in. What is the best way to seal those cracks? Answer: Before you do anything about that cracked floor, test for radon first. Better yet, have a professional make the test for you. The reason for contacting a professional: You might need to install a system to exhaust the vapors if the radon is present in a dangerous concentration.
REAL ESTATE
October 5, 1986
The National Assn. of Home Builders will soon begin to monitor construction of 100 radon-proof homes in New Jersey. The project will demonstrate inexpensive ways of preventing radon from entering newly built homes and will lead to finding methods to eliminate radon from existing homes. The study will cost an estimated $280,000, and will be funded by federal, state and private sources.
NEWS
September 5, 1986 | Associated Press
The Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday it wants to bring radon, a radioactive gas believed to kill thousands of people every year, under its drinking water purity regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | PAUL PAYNE
Radon testing at the Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme has been discontinued because only low levels of the harmful gas were detected in an initial check, Navy officials said Friday. The colorless, odorless gas is a naturally occurring product of decaying uranium in the earth and is said to cause lung cancer after long exposure. However, only minimal levels were identified during a 90-day test of child-care centers and selected family housing on the base, officials said.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
An unusual new way to measure the concentration of radioactive radon gas in homes over long periods has been developed by a Swedish scientist. Physicist Christer Samuelsson of the University of Lund in Sweden reported in a paper published in today's Nature magazine that glass objects such as windows, mirrors and the glass in picture frames contain a permanent record of the amount of radon that has been present in a house over its lifetime--or at least since the glass was brought into the home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
More than a week ago, a scientist little known in earthquake circles made a bold prediction of a destructive earthquake in the Abruzzo region of central Italy based on spikes in radon gas. Giampaolo Giuliani went so far as to tell the mayor of a town there that it would strike within the next 24 hours. His deadline passed and for days, nothing happened. Then, early Monday, a magnitude-6.
REAL ESTATE
June 24, 2001 | MORRIS CAREY and JAMES CAREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I have cracks in my concrete basement floor from which I believe radon gas is creeping in. What is the best way to seal those cracks? Answer: Before you do anything about that cracked floor, test for radon first. Better yet, have a professional make the test for you. The reason for contacting a professional: You might need to install a system to exhaust the vapors if the radon is present in a dangerous concentration.
HEALTH
March 13, 2000 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Like all physicians, we learned about radon, an odorless gas that has been linked to lung cancer. However, it wasn't until one of us tried to purchase a house--and the inspection revealed elevated radon levels--that the issue struck home. Radon gas is produced by the decay of uranium, an element almost universally present in soil and rock. Radon moves slowly through ground soil and can enter homes through openings or cracks in the foundations and construction joints.
REAL ESTATE
November 7, 1999
In an Oct. 31 letter, Lisa Finn asked how she can protect her health from chlordane residue under her house. I would like to suggest moving the poisoned air out of the crawl space before it has a chance to migrate into her home's living space. This is not a permanent solution because I have no knowledge of the time it takes chlordane to break down into nontoxic byproducts, but forcing crawl space air out from under the house seems an inexpensive intermediate step until a better long-term solution can be undertaken.
REAL ESTATE
July 18, 1999 | BARRY STONE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: Our home was recently found to contain unsafe levels of radon gas. In fact, the people who had offered to buy our home canceled the purchase when they received the test results. Now we're wondering how we can sell our home. Who will want to buy it when they learn about radioactive contamination in the air? Is there anything we can do to eliminate the problem? Answer: Please don't lose heart.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state health department survey that languished for a year before being released Tuesday estimates that about 5% of California's elementary school classrooms have significant concentrations of radon, an odorless and invisible cancer-causing gas. The state Department of Health Services report, dated May 1998, is based on a sampling of 378 of California's 5,400 elementary schools.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
Radon, a natural radioactive gas that collects in some homes, is linked to about 21,800 American lung cancer deaths a year, researchers said Thursday. Most of the victims were smokers. "Radon, particularly in combination with smoking, poses an important public health risk," said Dr. Jonathan Samet, a Johns Hopkins University professor and chairman of a National Research Council radon study committee.
HEALTH
March 13, 2000 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Like all physicians, we learned about radon, an odorless gas that has been linked to lung cancer. However, it wasn't until one of us tried to purchase a house--and the inspection revealed elevated radon levels--that the issue struck home. Radon gas is produced by the decay of uranium, an element almost universally present in soil and rock. Radon moves slowly through ground soil and can enter homes through openings or cracks in the foundations and construction joints.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | United Press International
The state's top doctor said Friday that state and federal health officials would survey 3,000 homes to measure the presence of radon gas, undertaking California's largest-ever study of the cancer-causing substance. State Health Director Kenneth Kizer said the California Department of Health Services and the federal Environmental Protection Agency will conduct the statewide survey. Kizer said participants in the survey would be randomly selected from telephone lists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995 | DAVID R. BAKER
As part of National Radon Action Week, the American Lung Assn. of Ventura County will conduct a series of public seminars starting Saturday about the invisible, cancer-causing gas. Of all the counties in California, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties face the greatest risk of radon gas, according to the association. The radioactive gas seeps out of underground rocks and can collect in homes. It is a leading cause of lung cancer, second only to smoking.
HOME & GARDEN
April 23, 1994 | FRANK ROYLANCE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The bright orange Fiesta dishware that many Americans use and collect could be giving off enough radon gas to pose a significant health risk, a geologist says. "When we test homes and look for radon, we always suppose it comes from the ground," said Rudolph Hon of Boston College. "Maybe we need to make the public aware that some of it can be coming from the cabinet."
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