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Radon Gas

NEWS
March 19, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radon levels in one of every five public schools in the United States exceed the Environmental Protection Agency's safety standard, according to a survey outlined before a House subcommittee Thursday. The EPA study, based on the examination of 900 randomly selected schools, projected that more than 70,000 classrooms in 15,000 schools have high levels of the odorless, colorless radioactive gas, which is believed to cause thousands of cases of lung cancer each year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | KAY SAILLANT
A program being considered by the Ventura County Board of Supervisors would offer information about radon and testing for the deadly gas. Ventura County is one of 50 counties across the nation that have been offered a $10,000 grant from a national radon awareness organization to set up the program. Supervisors will vote on the program Tuesday, said Donald W. Koepp, director of the county's environmental health division.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | From Reuters
Radiation that contaminated a dozen workers at a U.S. air base came from radon gas that accumulated naturally and not from the improper disposal of nuclear weapons, the Air Force said Sunday. The discovery means the workers, who were contaminated at Loring Air Force Base near the Canadian border, are less likely to suffer long-term health problems, Air Force officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991
Unsafe levels of cancer-causing radon are present in about one in seven homes in parts of the western San Fernando Valley, a state study released Tuesday says. The report by the state Department of Health Services estimated that 14% of homes in Encino, Tarzana, Woodland Hills and Agoura Hills have levels of radon above federal safety standards for the gas, which the American Lung Assn. has called the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unsafe levels of cancer-causing radon are present in about one in seven homes in parts of the western San Fernando Valley, according to a state study released Tuesday that prompted health officials to urge residents to test their homes for the radioactive gas. The report estimated that 14% of homes in Encino, Tarzana, Woodland Hills and Agoura Hills have levels above federal guidelines for radon, which the American Lung Assn. has called the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | PAUL PAYNE
Radon testing at the Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme has been discontinued because only low levels of the harmful gas were detected in an initial check, Navy officials said Friday. The colorless, odorless gas is a naturally occurring product of decaying uranium in the earth and is said to cause lung cancer after long exposure. However, only minimal levels were identified during a 90-day test of child-care centers and selected family housing on the base, officials said.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High levels of radon--a radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer--have been found in Santa Barbara--the first time widespread amounts of the gas have been discovered in a California residential neighborhood, state Health Director Kenneth Kizer said Wednesday. Isolated cases of high radon levels have been found in some California neighborhoods, but this is the first time a "hot spot" has been found in the state, Kizer said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Although scientists have long believed that levels of radon are highest in homes during winter, new results suggest that high concentrations can occur at any time in the year and are most likely during periods of rain or snow, according to geologist Daniel J. Greeman of Pennsylvania State University. He said at a conference in Baltimore that homeowners should test their dwellings for radon several times over the course of a year before they conclude that it is not a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even as local health officials sought Thursday to mobilize public concern over radon, their state and federal counterparts were preparing to unveil a new study that shows California near the bottom of the nation in the prevalence of the odorless-but-lethal gas. Officials with the Los Angeles County Health Department and the American Lung Assn.
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