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Rae Franklin James

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993
RAE FRANKLIN JAMES Housing and planning * Born: Aug. 21, 1942 * Residence: View Park * Education: University of California Berkeley, bachelor of arts; graduate studies in public finance at Cal State Hayward. * Career highlights: Legislative analyst for city of Los Angeles since 1989; has worked for the city for 10 years in various jobs. * Family: Not available. MICHAEL F.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1994 | When Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan went on vacation this month, DEPUTY MAYOR RAE FRANKLIN JAMES found herself handling major controversies about subway construction and a proposed "camping area" for the homeless on her own. and James leaped from the obscurity of the city legislative analyst's office to the local spotlight without ever having met Riordan before taking the job--she was recommended to him by a trusted aide. Her areas of responsibility include environmental matters and community redevelopment as well as transportation and housing. and James, 45, was interviewed at her spacious but modestly furnished office on the 3rd floor of City Hall (down the hall from the mayor's) by KAY MILLS, author of "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Plume, 1994). and
Question: When the mayor named you to this job, what was his charge to you? Answer: He said, "Do you think you can make the hard decisions? Do you think you can stand up for a conviction and be able to face a confrontation that goes along with it and realize that I'm going to hold you accountable the whole time?" I said, "Yes." I felt comfortable with that. He didn't know me, I didn't know him. I was referred by Bill McCarley, then chief of staff.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan on Tuesday appointed the last of his five deputy mayors, three more than served under his predecessor, but top aides vowed that he still will wind up with a leaner staff than Tom Bradley's Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993
RAE FRANKLIN JAMES Housing and planning * Born: Aug. 21, 1942 * Residence: View Park * Education: University of California Berkeley, bachelor of arts; graduate studies in public finance at Cal State Hayward. * Career highlights: Legislative analyst for city of Los Angeles since 1989; has worked for the city for 10 years in various jobs. * Family: Not available. MICHAEL F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1994 | When Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan went on vacation this month, DEPUTY MAYOR RAE FRANKLIN JAMES found herself handling major controversies about subway construction and a proposed "camping area" for the homeless on her own. and James leaped from the obscurity of the city legislative analyst's office to the local spotlight without ever having met Riordan before taking the job--she was recommended to him by a trusted aide. Her areas of responsibility include environmental matters and community redevelopment as well as transportation and housing. and James, 45, was interviewed at her spacious but modestly furnished office on the 3rd floor of City Hall (down the hall from the mayor's) by KAY MILLS, author of "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Plume, 1994). and
Question: When the mayor named you to this job, what was his charge to you? Answer: He said, "Do you think you can make the hard decisions? Do you think you can stand up for a conviction and be able to face a confrontation that goes along with it and realize that I'm going to hold you accountable the whole time?" I said, "Yes." I felt comfortable with that. He didn't know me, I didn't know him. I was referred by Bill McCarley, then chief of staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the urging of the mayor's office, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved in concept a plan to build a Downtown drop-in center for the homeless where transients could take showers, get job training or rest. The council voted 13 to 0 to move forward with the $4-million center as part of a city and county effort--funded by a $20-million federal grant--to reduce homelessness in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1993 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And on the 18th day, Mayor Richard Riordan sat on the hot seat. Then he tried to show 2,500 volunteers from the city's four largest community organizations that Riordan, the mayor, will keep promises made by Riordan, the candidate. In a sweltering high school gymnasium on Los Angeles' Eastside, he signed papers Sunday that unfettered $2.5 million in city funds for Hope in Youth, a gang intervention program.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | TINA DAUNT and TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Determined to make Downtown Los Angeles friendlier to business, the Riordan Administration has launched a plan to shuttle homeless people to an urban campground on a fenced lot in the city's core industrial area. The mayor's proposal, which has come under heated attack by some homeless advocates, calls for turning a vacant city block in the eastern part of Downtown into a homeless drop-in center, where up to 800 people could take showers and sleep on a lawn.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | BRETT MAHONEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No officials asked Nate Forrest his opinion on the Riordan Administration's controversial proposal to open a drop-in center Downtown for the homeless. But after living on the streets for nine years, he has a few suggestions. The center, which would offer Forrest and about 200 other homeless people a fenced-in, grassy yard where they could sleep, has sparked a rancorous debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anyone seeking a glimpse into Mayor Richard Riordan's philosophy for turning around neighborhoods need look no further than the knot of locals who trudged along Highland Park's sagging commercial strip one recent showery morning. Umbrellas bobbing in unison, they stopped periodically to point out the possibilities they see in a once-grand movie theater, a long-empty bank building, even in the harsh metal security doors shuttering stores not yet open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan on Tuesday appointed the last of his five deputy mayors, three more than served under his predecessor, but top aides vowed that he still will wind up with a leaner staff than Tom Bradley's Administration.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | Bettijane Levine
Where were you when the cold rains came on Christmas weekend? In your car with the heater on and the windows cracked open? In a hut constructed of cardboard cartons? Beneath a concrete overpass next to a blazing fire? Or perhaps on a cot in a shelter--alert to the smells, sounds and threats of others too close for comfort? The options are grim for more than 100,000 people on frosty nights when almost everyone with four walls to call home is sleeping safely inside them.
NEWS
December 23, 1994 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by managerial problems that he says "drive me nuts" and concerned that his own economic recovery plan will falter without better public transportation, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan is moving to assert greater control over the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the troubled agency that oversees the nation's largest public works project.
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