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Rae Lawrence

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NEWS
July 3, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
Pass the Vicodin, the Coppertone and your mate, please. We've just cavorted through our copy of this summer's sequel to Jacqueline Susann's 1966 cult classic, "Valley of the Dolls." Susann died 27 years ago, but her literary legacy lives on, much to our guilty pleasure. The sequel, "Shadow of the Dolls," has been ghost-written by author Rae Lawrence. In real life, she's Ruth Liebmann, 45, a clever sales exec at Random House, parent company of her publisher, Crown.
BOOKS
June 14, 1987 | KAREN STABINER
Authors of July best sellers know their books will likely be read on vacation, where they have to contend with the elements--from the enervating rays of the sun to a distracting parade of bodies as scantily clad and amply endowed as anything described on the printed page. If they have one thing in common, beachtime books try just a bit harder. Their stories rev at higher r.p.m.s, in settings that are even more outlandish than usual. The big July book issues the challenge: Are you ready for this?
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientific researchers haven't yet proved that brain cells melt in the summer sun. But is empirical evidence really necessary to explain the perennial popularity of beach books, or pool novels, or whatever term publishing industry marketers conjure up to describe trashy entertainments as addictive as M&Ms? Did I say addictive? Yes. As habit-forming as Percodan, the What, Me Worry, mood-elevating painkiller. Or Valium, the Chanel of sedatives, simultaneously modern and classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
James Cameron has a most active imagination. Not for him the mere copying of what has gone before, even if his past does include "Aliens," "The Terminator" and "Terminator 2." Compelled to come up with sequences that other manipulators of mayhem have yet to imagine, he pushes the envelope further and further into the unknown with each film he makes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
What is it about Los Angeles that makes filmmakers think the world is going to end here first? Certainly the confluence of fire, earthquake and riot has not helped. Or is just getting stuck on the freeway on the way to the Valley enough to trigger apocalyptic thoughts? "Strange Days," the latest epic of dystopia to come out of Hollywood, is a direct if feeble descendant of "Blade Runner," that venerable prophet of urban decay.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1981, his first year with the company, Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization President Ted Chapin found several programs gathering dust in a closet. "There were all of these reels of film in closets all over the place," Chapin said. "I actually rented a 16-millimeter projector and set it up in the conference room and looked at all of the films." Most of the reels weren't very interesting to Chapin.
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