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Rafael Caldera

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NEWS
February 3, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Caldera took the oath of office Wednesday as modern Venezuela's eighth president, promising a government of austerity and integrity and proposing sweeping economic reforms to overcome "the gravest and most complicated crisis of the last 20 years."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998
Faced with the prospect of an unsuccessful but unrepentant coup leader winning Sunday's presidential election, the two dominant Venezuelan political parties have abandoned their choices and rallied behind Henrique Salas, the only democratic candidate who stands a chance.
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NEWS
February 1, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Caldera first ran for president in 1947. Harry S. Truman was in the White House, and Venezuela was an economic mess governed by corrupt and inefficient autocrats with a restless military looking over their shoulders. The 31-year-old candidate was viewed as a loose cannon of national politics, and he lost. Time has passed, but much remains the same. Venezuela is again an economic mess, its last government was corrupt and inefficient, and the military looms ominously in the background.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Caldera took the oath of office Wednesday as modern Venezuela's eighth president, promising a government of austerity and integrity and proposing sweeping economic reforms to overcome "the gravest and most complicated crisis of the last 20 years."
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hopes that Venezuela's upcoming exercise in democracy--next month's national elections--will end the country's explosive political crisis have been dashed by a vitriolic campaign and increasing fears of a military takeover if the front-running presidential candidate wins. "I thought it was a lot of crap," said a visiting banker of the coup speculation. "This is a country with 30 years of solid democracy, lots of oil, educated workers and a leader in modernizing its economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998
Faced with the prospect of an unsuccessful but unrepentant coup leader winning Sunday's presidential election, the two dominant Venezuelan political parties have abandoned their choices and rallied behind Henrique Salas, the only democratic candidate who stands a chance.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Caldera, a political renegade whose campaign was plagued by vague threats of a military coup and U.S. dissatisfaction with his economic policies, appeared to be elected as Venezuela's president Sunday. Exit polls by the country's television networks indicated that Caldera's promise of honesty and a return to Venezuela's economic golden age of the 1970s had given him about 30% of the vote.
NEWS
December 8, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Rafael Caldera, winning Venezuela's presidency for the second time is an honor and an opportunity to restore the economy and the soul of his country, a dubious prospect in the minds of many diplomats and analysts. "Caldera has never seen this election as one of specific issues or even of normal politics," a diplomat said in the wake of the 77-year-old Caldera's presidential victory in Sunday's election--his second such win in more than two decades.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
On the fifth anniversary of major riots against price hikes, the government put together a new economic plan that aims to defuse social unrest. President Rafael Caldera suspended a portion of the constitution, which allows free commerce, thus possibly setting the stage for reimposing price controls. Caldera also suspended an unpopular value-added tax at the retail level. That means only importers and wholesalers have to pay the full 10%.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Caldera first ran for president in 1947. Harry S. Truman was in the White House, and Venezuela was an economic mess governed by corrupt and inefficient autocrats with a restless military looking over their shoulders. The 31-year-old candidate was viewed as a loose cannon of national politics, and he lost. Time has passed, but much remains the same. Venezuela is again an economic mess, its last government was corrupt and inefficient, and the military looms ominously in the background.
NEWS
December 8, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Rafael Caldera, winning Venezuela's presidency for the second time is an honor and an opportunity to restore the economy and the soul of his country, a dubious prospect in the minds of many diplomats and analysts. "Caldera has never seen this election as one of specific issues or even of normal politics," a diplomat said in the wake of the 77-year-old Caldera's presidential victory in Sunday's election--his second such win in more than two decades.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Caldera, a political renegade whose campaign was plagued by vague threats of a military coup and U.S. dissatisfaction with his economic policies, appeared to be elected as Venezuela's president Sunday. Exit polls by the country's television networks indicated that Caldera's promise of honesty and a return to Venezuela's economic golden age of the 1970s had given him about 30% of the vote.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hopes that Venezuela's upcoming exercise in democracy--next month's national elections--will end the country's explosive political crisis have been dashed by a vitriolic campaign and increasing fears of a military takeover if the front-running presidential candidate wins. "I thought it was a lot of crap," said a visiting banker of the coup speculation. "This is a country with 30 years of solid democracy, lots of oil, educated workers and a leader in modernizing its economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Sheriff's detectives have named a suspect in the killing of two brothers outside a tire repair shop. Oscar Navarro, 25, allegedly rode a bicycle up to Rafael Caldera, 23, and Alvaro Caldera, 19, asked them where they were from, then pulled a gun and began firing. The shooting occurred about 1:30 p.m. Monday near East 3rd Street and South Ditman Avenue. The victims were Los Angeles residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County sheriff's detectives identified a suspect Wednesday in the killing of two brothers outside a tire repair shop in East Los Angeles. Oscar Navarro, 25, allegedly rode a bicycle up to Rafael Caldera, 23, and Alvaro Caldera, 19, asked them where they were from, then pulled out a gun and began firing. The shooting occurred about 1:30 p.m. Monday near East 3rd Street and South Ditman Avenue. Both victims were Los Angeles residents.
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