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Rafael Caro Quintero

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NEWS
October 20, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four Jehovah's Witnesses who disappeared five years ago in Guadalajara, Mexico, may have been mistaken for U.S. drug agents and killed by the narcotics cartel suspected in the slaying of federal drug agent Enrique Camarena, according to Justice Department and intelligence sources. If true, the four met a fate that later befell two other Americans--a writer and a student--who in 1985 were similarly mistaken by Mexican drug traffickers for U.S.
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WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- A fugitive drug kingpin convicted in the slaying of an American federal agent is urging Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto to resist U.S. “pressure” for his extradition and to end the manhunt pursuing him, an official said Tuesday. Atty. Gen. Jesus Murillo Karam confirmed to reporters the existence of a letter written by Rafael Caro Quintero, who was released from prison in August after serving 28 years of a 40-year sentence for the 1985 slaying of DEA agent Enrique Camarena.
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OPINION
August 18, 2013 | By Elaine Shannon
Shortly after 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9, 1985, agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, frantically searching for their kidnapped comrade Enrique Camarena, spotted the prime suspect - cartel kingpin Rafael Caro Quintero, surrounded by five machine-gun-toting bodyguards, strutting toward a Falcon executive jet on the Guadalajara airport tarmac. The swarthy young trafficker, sporting pricey cowboy boots and a blinding 6-inch-wide diamond bracelet, beckoned the Mexican police commander minding the Americans, whispered a promise of 60 million pesos (about $270,000)
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The U.S. State Department is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading to the arrest of Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, who was convicted in the murder of a U.S. anti-narcotics agent in 1985, but vanished in August after a Mexican court freed him from prison on a technicality. Caro Quintero, 61, once one of Mexico's most powerful drug kingpins, was last seen walking out of a medium security prison in the state of Jalisco around 2 a.m. on Aug. 9 after serving 28 years of a 40-year sentence.
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The U.S. State Department is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading to the arrest of Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, who was convicted in the murder of a U.S. anti-narcotics agent in 1985, but vanished in August after a Mexican court freed him from prison on a technicality. Caro Quintero, 61, once one of Mexico's most powerful drug kingpins, was last seen walking out of a medium security prison in the state of Jalisco around 2 a.m. on Aug. 9 after serving 28 years of a 40-year sentence.
WORLD
August 19, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Keely Walker Muse remembers her dad's "sloppy" hair, his goofy jokes, the limp from a Vietnam War wound that he comically turned into a strut. She was 10 in the mid-1980s when John Walker moved his wife, Eve, along with Keely and her younger sister, Lannie, from Minneapolis to Guadalajara, where they thought they could live a little cheaper while John wrote a great American novel. They were not aware that the city of broad, leafy avenues cowered under the thumb of one of Mexico's first major drug cartels, run by master trafficker Rafael Caro Quintero.
NEWS
June 7, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Slain federal drug agent Enrique Camarena told his killers that agents knew the whereabouts of two of Mexico's most powerful drug lords but did not pursue them because they feared for their own lives, according to a tape-recording of Camarena's torture made public Monday. In a chilling transcript of Camarena's ordeal, filed in Los Angeles federal court, the Drug Enforcement Administration agent is heard complaining to his captors that U.S.
NEWS
June 13, 1985
Three of Mexico's top four drug barons ordered the killing of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique S. Camarena after he disclosed, under torture, that Washington considered the three "dangerous narcotics traffickers," a witness said in Mexico City.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mexican authorities are doing their best to ensure that drug kingpin Rafael Caro Quintero, recently sentenced to 40 years in jail, will spend New Year's with his family. For the second time in two days, the attorney general's office announced the arrest on drug trafficking charges of a relative of Caro Quintero, sentenced for the 1985 murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena.
WORLD
September 21, 2013 | Richard Fausset
Vice President Joe Biden, in the Mexican capital Friday for meetings with top government officials and business leaders, said he was glad to be focusing on trade rather than on security issues and argued that an economically prosperous Mexico would strengthen the economy of the United States. Biden said that his visits to Mexico as a senator in previous decades were "mostly about security issues -- mostly about drugs, mostly about immigration. And finally -- finally -- we have reached the point we should have reached a long time ago, I think ... where we're looking at the relationship as partners.
WORLD
September 20, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Vice President Joe Biden, in the Mexican capital Friday for meetings with government officials and business leaders, said he was glad to be focusing on trade rather than on security issues, and argued that an economically prosperous Mexico would strengthen the economy of the United States. Biden said that his visits to Mexico as a senator in previous decades were “mostly about security issues - mostly about drugs, mostly about immigration. And finally -- finally -- we have reached the point we should have reached a long time ago, I think … where we're looking at the relationship as partners, in a wholesome way.” The vice president spoke Friday morning in Mexico's Foreign Relations building to open what is planned to be a yearly “High Level Economic Dialogue” between Mexican and U.S. officials.
WORLD
August 19, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Keely Walker Muse remembers her dad's "sloppy" hair, his goofy jokes, the limp from a Vietnam War wound that he comically turned into a strut. She was 10 in the mid-1980s when John Walker moved his wife, Eve, along with Keely and her younger sister, Lannie, from Minneapolis to Guadalajara, where they thought they could live a little cheaper while John wrote a great American novel. They were not aware that the city of broad, leafy avenues cowered under the thumb of one of Mexico's first major drug cartels, run by master trafficker Rafael Caro Quintero.
OPINION
August 18, 2013 | By Elaine Shannon
Shortly after 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9, 1985, agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, frantically searching for their kidnapped comrade Enrique Camarena, spotted the prime suspect - cartel kingpin Rafael Caro Quintero, surrounded by five machine-gun-toting bodyguards, strutting toward a Falcon executive jet on the Guadalajara airport tarmac. The swarthy young trafficker, sporting pricey cowboy boots and a blinding 6-inch-wide diamond bracelet, beckoned the Mexican police commander minding the Americans, whispered a promise of 60 million pesos (about $270,000)
WORLD
August 13, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's foreign minister said Tuesday that his government would try to reverse an appeals court ruling that led to the release of a reputed drug kingpin imprisoned for the 1985 slaying of a U.S. narcotics agent. “The decision, in our opinion, wasn't respectful of the legal framework,” Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade told reporters Tuesday, referring to the appeals ruling that led to last week's release of alleged drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero. “We will have to find the way to reverse it.” Caro Quintero, who is alleged to be a founder of the once-powerful Guadalajara drug cartel, walked out of a prison in the state of Jalisco on Friday after serving 28 years of a 40-year sentence for the kidnapping, torture and murder of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena.
WORLD
August 10, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - It might have been an obscure regional court that released notorious drug kingpin Rafael Caro Quintero from prison, but it will be the 8-month-old government of President Enrique Peña Nieto that will have to handle the furious fallout. Caro Quintero, one of Mexico's major drug cartel leaders, was freed Friday after serving 28 years for the kidnapping, torture and murder of a U.S. narcotics agent, Enrique "Kiki" Camarena, in 1985. The court vacated his conviction and lifted what remained of a 40-year sentence, based on a technicality.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - They were two of Mexico's most flamboyant bad boys, symbols for many here of all that was wrong with this country in the 1980s and '90s. Rafael Caro Quintero was a high-rolling drug lord sent to prison for the 1985 kidnapping, torture and slaying of an agent with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Raul Salinas, the brother of a former Mexican president, was a free-spending playboy. He was convicted, and then acquitted, of the 1994 killing of a top politician.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Notorious drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, convicted in the 1985 kidnap and murder of an American narcotics agent, was freed from prison Friday after serving 28 years for a crime that vexed U.S.-Mexican relations for decades. Special Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was working for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, based in the city of Guadalajara, when Caro Quintero allegedly ordered him killed. Camarena went missing in February 1985, as he left the U.S. consulate.
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