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Rafael Correa

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OPINION
May 7, 2009
One measure of the political turmoil that has roiled Ecuador, the Colorado-sized country in the Andes, is its rapid turnover for presidents: eight in the last 13 years. So the recent reelection of Rafael Correa is a notable step toward a more mature democracy. Correa, who took office in January 2007, last month became the first chief executive in 30 years to win reelection without a runoff.
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WORLD
July 30, 2013 | By Pablo Jaramillo Viteri
QUITO, Ecuador --  Much of Ecuador was in mourning Tuesday over the sudden death in Doha, Qatar, of one of its most popular soccer players,  27-year-old Christian  “Chucho” Benitez. Benitez was a stalwart on the South American country's national team, the leading scorer this year in the Mexican league, and most recently an imported star on the Al Jaish team in Doha. Benitez also was expected to play a major role in Ecuador's bid for the  World Cup next year in Brazil.
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WORLD
October 15, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
An audacious South American politician has made an unflattering comparison between President Bush and the devil, threatened to nationalize oil production and expressed his commitment to popular revolution. And it's not Hugo Chavez. The rhetoric of Rafael Correa, the favorite in today's presidential election here, could pass for that of Chavez, the Venezuelan leader. Correa, a 43-year-old U.S.-educated economist, has struck a stridently anti-U.S.
WORLD
July 3, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Latin American leaders expressed outrage Wednesday at decisions that forced a plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales to make an unscheduled landing in Austria, amid suspicions that U.S. intelligence leaker Edward Snowden might be on board. “This is EXTREMELY serious,” Rafael Correa, the president of Ecuador, wrote on his Twitter account. Ecuador was one of the first countries that Snowden, the former National Security Agency contract worker who is apparently still holed up in Moscow's international airport, appealed to for refuge.
WORLD
November 27, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
In a potential blow to already-weakened U.S. influence in Latin America, leftist economist Rafael Correa appeared to be sweeping to victory Sunday in Ecuador's presidential election. A native of Guayaquil, Correa received about 65% of the vote, overpowering banana magnate and perennial candidate Alvaro Noboa, who garnered 35%, according to an official count of 20% of the ballots cast. Full results won't be known until today or Tuesday. Noboa has not conceded.
WORLD
November 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's Rafael Correa, a leftist vowing to rein in political elites, won Sunday's presidential runoff with 57% of the votes after most ballot boxes were tallied, a top election official said. Opponent Alvaro Noboa has refused to accept defeat and says he might challenge the election with a review of the ballots.
WORLD
September 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's leftist president, Rafael Correa, urged his opponents to join his efforts to build a more just society, saying the overwhelming victory of his constitutional referendum gave him a broad mandate. With 90% of ballots counted, 64% of Ecuadorean voters approved the measure. Correa got the majority he needed in all but two of Ecuador's 24 provinces. The 20th constitution in the history of the nation considerably broadens Correa's powers and will let him run for two more consecutive terms.
WORLD
April 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Leftist President Rafael Correa was headed to a major victory Sunday as Ecuadoreans voted overwhelmingly to support his plan to remake the nation's system of government and weaken its discredited Congress, early returns showed. Electoral officials said that with 18% of ballots counted, 83% of voters backed Correa's call for a special assembly to rewrite the constitution, a measure many hope will bring economic improvement.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The Organization of American States finishes up its annual meeting in Bolivia on Tuesday. The normally humdrum assembly of 35 nations is turning out to be one of the most controversial gatherings in years, thanks to an effort by a handful of countries to weaken one of the OAS' most important and autonomous bodies: the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Those efforts began early this year when Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, sought to prevent the commission's special rapporteur for freedom of expression from doing her job effectively.
WORLD
July 30, 2013 | By Pablo Jaramillo Viteri
QUITO, Ecuador --  Much of Ecuador was in mourning Tuesday over the sudden death in Doha, Qatar, of one of its most popular soccer players,  27-year-old Christian  “Chucho” Benitez. Benitez was a stalwart on the South American country's national team, the leading scorer this year in the Mexican league, and most recently an imported star on the Al Jaish team in Doha. Benitez also was expected to play a major role in Ecuador's bid for the  World Cup next year in Brazil.
WORLD
February 17, 2013 | By Pablo Jaramillo Viteri and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
QUITO, Ecuador - Ecuador's incumbent president, Rafael Correa, swept to an easy reelection victory Sunday, winning 58% of the vote according to a preliminary official sampling - an overwhelming margin that entitles him to a third term without having a runoff. The 49-year-old leftist economist easily outdistanced his closest finishers, banker Guillermo Lasso with 24%, former President Lucio Gutierrez with 6%, and banana exporter Alvaro Noboa with 4%, according to a snap count released by the national electoral commission.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, is weighing whether to grant WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's request for political asylum. The Australian-born Assange, who is fighting extradition to Sweden to face sexual-assault allegations, is holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. Whatever the fiery populist president decides, this is a bizarre story because Correa has shown little tolerance for freedom of expression in Ecuador. He's engaged in a war of words with the media, conjuring up archaic libel laws to go after newspaper owners and a columnist he disagreed with.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The Organization of American States finishes up its annual meeting in Bolivia on Tuesday. The normally humdrum assembly of 35 nations is turning out to be one of the most controversial gatherings in years, thanks to an effort by a handful of countries to weaken one of the OAS' most important and autonomous bodies: the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Those efforts began early this year when Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, sought to prevent the commission's special rapporteur for freedom of expression from doing her job effectively.
WORLD
February 28, 2012 | By Cristina Munoz and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
  Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa on Monday pardoned three owner-editors and a columnist at the El Universo newspaper who had been convicted of defaming him in a controversial press freedom case. Brothers Carlos, Cesar and Nicolas Perez and columnist Emilio Palacio had been ordered to pay $42 million in fines and serve three years in prison for publishing an allegedly libelous opinion piece by Palacio in February 2011 in the Guayaquil-based paper, the nation's second-largest.
OPINION
January 23, 2012
Since taking office in 2007, Ecuador's President Rafael Correa has been in a war of words with the media in his country. He's used archaic libel laws to pursue criminal charges against the owners of El Universo and a columnist at the newspaper. His government has pushed through a law that severely restricts the media's ability to cover political campaigns and elections; indeed, it goes so far as to ban any media reports that can benefit or hurt a candidate. And now he's set his sights on international media observers.
WORLD
October 2, 2010 | reuters
? President Rafael Correa's victory over violent police protests in Ecuador is not yet fully assured, though the situation is under control for now, Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino said Friday. Correa was physically attacked and trapped in a hospital for several hours Thursday before troops rescued him in a blaze of gunfire. The leftist president said police officers protesting spending cuts were joined by some elements of the military and made an attempt to oust him. "We can't claim total victory.
WORLD
July 3, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Latin American leaders expressed outrage Wednesday at decisions that forced a plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales to make an unscheduled landing in Austria, amid suspicions that U.S. intelligence leaker Edward Snowden might be on board. “This is EXTREMELY serious,” Rafael Correa, the president of Ecuador, wrote on his Twitter account. Ecuador was one of the first countries that Snowden, the former National Security Agency contract worker who is apparently still holed up in Moscow's international airport, appealed to for refuge.
OPINION
August 29, 2009
The facts of Aguinda vs. Texaco Inc. haven't changed since the lawsuit was first filed in 1993, but the world has. Climate change and environmental stewardship have become international concerns. The dignity of native populations around the world has been recognized in a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted by the United Nations. And after 16 years of litigation in the United States and, now, Ecuador, the lawsuit against Chevron Corp. has become a cause celebre among human rights activists and environmentalists.
WORLD
October 1, 2010 | By Chris Kraul and Paul Rosero, Los Angeles Times
Amid volleys of gunfire and concussion grenade blasts, Ecuadorean armed forces Thursday night rescued President Rafael Correa from a hospital where he had been held for several hours against his will by police mutineers. The rescue ended a 12-hour standoff between the government and dissident police officers who shoved Correa and threw tear gas canisters at him Thursday morning when he arrived at a north Quito police barracks to confront protesters upset over his veto of legislation that would have given police better benefits and salaries.
WORLD
February 21, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Ecuador is trying to salvage its campaign to enlist international sponsors to protect a pristine nature reserve in the Amazon, after an initial drive ended in disarray and doubts about whether President Rafael Correa would leave the park's oil riches untouched. Correa recently appointed former Foreign Minister Maria Fernanda Espinosa to head a new panel to seek donations from Arab and Asian countries for the 2.4-million-acre Yasuni National Park, one of the world's most biodiverse nature reserves.
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