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Rafael Leonardo Callejas

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NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unofficial results in presidential voting in Honduras indicate a strong victory for National Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas, 46, a U.S.-educated agronomist who has advocated free-market cures for Honduras' moribund economy. With about 75% of the vote counted, radio reports give Callejas a commanding lead of about 6 percentage points over his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Sacusse of the ruling Liberal Party.
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NEWS
January 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States plans to complete its withdrawal of troops from Panama "in a time period of weeks rather than months," Vice President Dan Quayle assured Latin American leaders Saturday as he began a three-day fence-mending trip to Central America. Speaking to reporters after his first meeting of the day--a breakfast session with President Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador--Quayle said he is telling the Latin leaders gathered here for the inauguration of new Honduran President Rafael L.
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NEWS
November 27, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationalist Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas declared early today that he is the winner of this Central American nation's presidential race. Unofficial electoral results show that Callejas, a 46-year-old agricultural economist, had a safe lead of 6 to 9 percentage points against his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Facusse, of the ruling Liberal Party. The Liberals have governed Honduras for eight years, coming to power early in this decade after a series of military governments.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unofficial results in presidential voting in Honduras indicate a strong victory for National Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas, 46, a U.S.-educated agronomist who has advocated free-market cures for Honduras' moribund economy. With about 75% of the vote counted, radio reports give Callejas a commanding lead of about 6 percentage points over his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Sacusse of the ruling Liberal Party.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States plans to complete its withdrawal of troops from Panama "in a time period of weeks rather than months," Vice President Dan Quayle assured Latin American leaders Saturday as he began a three-day fence-mending trip to Central America. Speaking to reporters after his first meeting of the day--a breakfast session with President Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador--Quayle said he is telling the Latin leaders gathered here for the inauguration of new Honduran President Rafael L.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Vice President Dan Quayle will attend the Jan. 27 inauguration of the new president of Honduras and will visit Europe next month, his spokesman said Wednesday. Quayle's schedule includes a one-day visit to Honduras for the inauguration of Rafael Leonardo Callejas, elected in November, said Quayle's press secretary, David Beckwith. Sources said the possibility of additional stops in the region--such as Panama or El Salvador--are under consideration. The vice president will be in Europe from Feb.
SPORTS
July 31, 2003 | Jim Barrero, Times Staff Writer
FIFA vice president Jack Warner fired the latest volley Wednesday in the ongoing club vs. country debate. Warner, from Trinidad and also the president of the region encompassing North and Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF), criticized Europe's top clubs for keeping their players for exhibition tours instead of releasing them to play in events sanctioned by world soccer's governing body.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Rafael Leonardo Callejas said Tuesday that the thousands of U.S.-supported Contras based near the Nicaraguan border must leave Honduras as soon as possible. "I don't want to force circumstances in Nicaragua, which is now going through a period of political transition following a victory by the opposition at the polls, but these rebels should not continue to stay in our territory," he told a news conference.
NEWS
November 25, 1985 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S.-backed presidential elections got off to a rocky start here Sunday with confusion at polling places over American-supplied "ink" used to mark the pinky finger of each voter. Hondurans customarily are required to dip a finger in red ink after casting their ballots as a measure to prevent multiple voting.
SPORTS
January 20, 2003 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Honduras national team goalkeeper Milton "Chocolate" Flores was shot and killed while sitting in his car in the crime-ridden La Union neighborhood of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, early Sunday morning. Police said Flores, 28, was struck between seven and 10 times when his unknown assailants, believed to be members of a street gang, fired a burst of at least 15 shots from an automatic weapon before fleeing. No motive was known for the slaying, which occurred shortly before 3 a.m.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationalist Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas declared early today that he is the winner of this Central American nation's presidential race. Unofficial electoral results show that Callejas, a 46-year-old agricultural economist, had a safe lead of 6 to 9 percentage points against his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Facusse, of the ruling Liberal Party. The Liberals have governed Honduras for eight years, coming to power early in this decade after a series of military governments.
NEWS
November 26, 1985 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Opposition National Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas won the most votes in Honduras' presidential election but lost the presidency, according to unofficial returns released Monday. Jose Azcona Hoyo, the leading candidate from the ruling Liberal Party, came in second in the popular vote but is expected to be declared the winner of Sunday's election because his party earned more votes than the National Party.
NEWS
September 9, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The campaign for the November presidential election here is in full swing, laced with intrigue and taking place under the watchful eye of the powerful military. At least nine candidates are in the running, and a picture of each is to appear on the ballot. One candidate, fearing that few voters will recognize him, has substituted the picture of another, better-known politician--who is dead.
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