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Rafael Perez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1999
Re "Ex-Officer Calls Corruption a Chronic 'Cancer,' " Sept. 21: So Rafael Perez can't sleep at night because he is a corrupt cop? Rot in hell, Rafael. I did 27-plus years with the LAPD and I sleep like a baby at night. Oh, I forgot. I didn't steal eight pounds of cocaine. I didn't shoot anyone in 27 years, let alone a handcuffed suspect. You made your bed, now take it like a man. CRAIG BUSHEY Sherman Oaks It's a blot on the justice system that a poltroon like Perez only gets a five-year sentence for his crimes.
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BOOKS
August 21, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is at work on a book about the biblical book of Revelation and its role in American culture and politics.
WHEN a guard at Alcatraz threatened to throw a convict named Ernie Lopez into an isolation cell soon after his arrival in 1945, Lopez was reminded of the closet in which his father used to lock him up after a beating or a forced dose of castor oil during his early childhood. His ordeal in the California criminal justice system, so compellingly and movingly recalled in "To Alcatraz, Death Row, and Back," was prefigured, in his telling, by the cruelties of an angry and brutal parent.
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NEWS
October 4, 2000 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal investigators are preparing to search a garbage-strewn hillside near downtown Tijuana for the graves of three people who an informant claims were buried there by former Los Angeles Police Department officers Rafael Perez and David Mack, law enforcement sources confirmed Tuesday. The search, expected to occur within days, is part of an ongoing federal investigation aimed at corroborating the allegations of 23-year-old Sonia Flores, Perez's former lover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2003 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Although top LAPD officials have long maintained that the corruption they found in Rampart did not spill over to other divisions in the department, confidential law enforcement documents and discipline records suggest similar problems in other divisions.
NEWS
January 2, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Perez has a noisy gait. As he walks, the legs of his pants rub against each other and the seat of his trousers sags precariously toward his heels, where his pants bunch up and scrape against the sidewalk. His oversize Ben Davis trousers, his black Ben Davis shirt and his buzz-cut hairstyle are indistinguishable from those favored by many of his fashion-conscious classmates at San Fernando Junior High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When jurors in the first Rampart police corruption case resume deliberations today, they will try to make sense of a prosecution missing the testimony of Rafael Perez, the disgraced officer who unleashed the scandal a year ago. Prosecutors did not call him to help make their case, and defense attorneys did not put him on the witness stand to discredit it. Without Perez, the jurors have been left with pieces of testimony originally meant to corroborate his story.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As former Los Angeles Police Officer Rafael Perez faced his second trial on drug theft charges earlier this year, the confident swagger of the tough anti-gang cop was gone. LAPD investigators, who had been dogging him for more than a year, had come up with new evidence that could put him behind bars for 12 years. He was haunted by his past misdeeds as a cop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A judge Tuesday reversed the convictions of nine more people allegedly framed by officers in the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division. Seven adults and two juveniles had their cases thrown out by Superior Court Judge Larry P. Fidler, bringing the number of convictions set aside as a consequence of the ongoing police corruption scandal to 32.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Perez, the former police officer behind the LAPD's Rampart scandal, has served his sentence and should be set free immediately, his lawyer argued in court Wednesday. However, the judge in the case declared that Perez's release date must be determined by state correctional officials and after a 30-minute hearing, the matter remained unresolved. "He's starting to serve extra time at this point," attorney Winston Kevin McKesson said of his client Perez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2000 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Mexican authorities halted their search for the bodies of three people allegedly killed and buried in a Tijuana ravine by a pair of rogue Los Angeles police officers, a lawyer charged Monday that the Mexicans were looking in the wrong place. Attorney Marshall Bitkower, who represents the informant who led authorities to the alleged grave site, said he reviewed videotape footage of the dig which shows that investigators were in the wrong spot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | Megan Garvey and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton said Tuesday that police officials are conducting enhanced investigations into three officer-involved shootings that corrupt ex-Officer Rafael Perez said were unjustified and covered up. "We are looking for additional information in all three cases," Bratton said. "We are basically starting from scratch in all three cases," added Assistant Chief Jim McDonnell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2002 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Perez's co-defendant in the Rampart police corruption scandal was sentenced to three years in prison Tuesday for violating federal civil rights laws and possessing an illicit weapon that was used to frame an innocent man. Former Los Angeles Police Officer Nino Durden bowed his head as U.S. District Judge Christina A. Snyder pronounced the sentence, the outgrowth of a plea bargain with prosecutors. Durden declined an offer to address the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2002 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Wednesday ordered a former LAPD Rampart Division officer to stand trial in the alleged 1998 beating and framing of a reputed gang member. After a three-day preliminary hearing, Judge William R. Chidsey Jr. ruled that the district attorney's office had presented enough evidence about the case to try ex-Officer Ethan Cohan on charges of assault with a deadly weapon, perjury, filing a false police report and conspiracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a federal plea agreement that sends him back to prison for two more years, ex-Los Angeles Police Officer Rafael Perez has agreed to pay full restitution to all the victims of the Rampart corruption scandal and forward any money he receives from telling his story in a book, movie or elsewhere to government entities, including the city of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2001 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Rampart-related case, five men convicted of manslaughter five years ago were ordered freed Monday after the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced it did not have adequate witnesses for a retrial. The men had served up to five years of their 12-year prison sentences for a gang-related shooting at a Rampart-area McDonald's restaurant. Superior Court Judge Larry Fidler dismissed the cases without comment and ordered the men freed after Deputy Dist. Atty. William W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001
Re "Judge Orders Perez Freed From Prison," July 24: Now that Rafael Perez has been released from prison, how about his starting to assume some of his financial responsibilities for the hundreds of millions of dollars Los Angeles taxpayers are burdened with as a result of his corruption? Maybe he can mow Javier Ovando's lawn for him, since Ovando's encounter with Perez left him wheelchair-bound. Perez stole an awful lot of cocaine; he must have money lying around somewhere. And to all you who laud Perez for exposing corruption in the Police Department, the only reason Perez "exposed" anyone was to save himself.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whatever else he was, is, or ever will be, for most of the 10 years Rafael Perez was in the Los Angeles Police Department he exemplified the hard-charging ideals the LAPD promotes. He was a good cop--a very good cop, even--who at some point became one of a certain, distinctive other kind of cop. Not an outlaw cop. Not at first. It started, as it usually does, more subtly than that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2001 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly three years behind bars, disgraced former Los Angeles Police Officer Rafael Perez was discharged from the California Correctional Institute in Tehachapi on Tuesday morning and placed on parole, authorities said. The terms of Perez's parole, as well as where he will live, were not disclosed by prison officials. A judge said Monday that Perez could be allowed to live out of state while under parole because of concerns about his safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge said Thursday he believes corrupt ex-LAPD Officer Rafael Perez should be a free man under the plea agreement he reached with prosecutors, but must remain in custody longer because of a series of technical errors and misjudgments. At the urging of the district attorney's office and state and county lawyers, Judge Robert J. Perry reluctantly ordered that Perez be immediately transferred to a state prison to finish serving his sentence.
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