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Rafael Perez

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2003 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Although top LAPD officials have long maintained that the corruption they found in Rampart did not spill over to other divisions in the department, confidential law enforcement documents and discipline records suggest similar problems in other divisions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge said Thursday he believes corrupt ex-LAPD Officer Rafael Perez should be a free man under the plea agreement he reached with prosecutors, but must remain in custody longer because of a series of technical errors and misjudgments. At the urging of the district attorney's office and state and county lawyers, Judge Robert J. Perry reluctantly ordered that Perez be immediately transferred to a state prison to finish serving his sentence.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
It was late last September when the Los Angeles cop who sullied the badge and turned stoolie, Rafael A. Perez, explained what made him want to be a police officer in the first place. Having grown up in Philadelphia watching '70s cops-and-robbers television fiction such as "Adam 12" and "CHiPs," Perez once told Times reporters in a phone interview from the L.A.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The first Rampart police corruption trial got underway Friday with prosecutors telling the court they would not give Rafael Perez immunity in an ongoing murder investigation and saying they might not even call as a witness the rogue-cop-turned-informant whose confessions triggered the scandal. Legal authorities said the development was a blow to the prosecution of this and possibly other cases against police officers implicated by Perez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000
Joseph Paggi's division of Los Angeles residents into "violent and lawless gangsters" and "law-abiding citizens"is exactly the attitude that got the Rampart cops into trouble (letter, Nov. 19). The Bill of Rights in this country applies to all. It is not for police officers to personally decide who is "good," and therefore must be treated according to constitutional law, and who is "bad" and can therefore be deprived of his civil rights. It is hypocritical for police officers to see themselves as above the law and therefore entitled to violate it when convenient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office, responding to a Los Angeles Police Department assertion that access to Rafael Perez is being limited, will grant police an interview with the Rampart informant as early as today. A spokeswoman for Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti said Sunday that Perez, the disgraced former officer at the center of the Rampart corruption scandal, is scheduled to be interviewed by LAPD Internal Affairs investigators today or Wednesday, depending on the availability of his attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disgraced former police officer Rafael Perez got a cut lip in a fistfight with his cellmates over what television show to watch, officials said Monday. The anti-gang officer who unleashed the Rampart scandal a year ago apparently wanted to watch "COPS" on Saturday night, authorities said. His cellmates at the Century Regional Detention Facility in Lynwood did not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles man whose drug conviction was overturned after he spent more than seven years in jail, on Tuesday filed the latest lawsuit growing out of the Los Angeles Police Department's ongoing scandal. Russell E. Newman, 42, charges that the city of Los Angeles violated his civil rights when former LAPD Officer Rafael Perez and other officers in the department's anti-gang unit allegedly framed him in 1991 on charges of selling cocaine.
OPINION
November 19, 2000
Re "3 Rampart Officers Convicted of Corruption; 4th Found Not Guilty," Nov. 16: If the three officers truly did what they were convicted of, they should have been disciplined administratively, not criminally tried. They were dealing with violent and lawless gangsters, many illegally residing in the United States. They may have stepped over the line in their zeal "to protect and serve" the law-abiding citizens of Los Angeles, but such actions did not warrant criminal convictions and disgrace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | TWILA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Los Angeles Police Officer Rafael Perez, who recently stopped cooperating with prosecutors investigating the Rampart police corruption case, should not be moved from a jail to a state prison to finish his sentence for stealing cocaine, a Superior Court judge ruled Friday. Judge Robert Perry said he was concerned about Perez's safety.
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