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Rafael Vinoly

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February 25, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Rafael Vinoly landed on the short list of the world's most hotly pursued architects in 1989, when he defeated 394 contenders in an international competition to design the Tokyo International Forum. The $1.5-billion performing arts and convention center -- a huge glass and steel structure frequently described as a great ship gliding through the central city -- opened in 1997 to widespread acclaim.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | Associated Press
The first new galleries from a big expansion at the Cleveland Museum of Art will open to the public on June 27. The new galleries are part of an eight-year, $335-million renovation that will increase the museum's size by 50%. The expansion was designed by architect Rafael Vinoly, whose credits include convention centers in Pittsburgh and Boston, Philadelphia's major performing arts center and the Tokyo International Forum conference center....
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NEWS
April 30, 2008
Kimmel architect: An article in Saturday's Calendar section about Southern California arts institutions refinancing their construction debt said the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia was designed by Cesar Pelli. The architect was Rafael Vinoly.
NEWS
April 30, 2008
Kimmel architect: An article in Saturday's Calendar section about Southern California arts institutions refinancing their construction debt said the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia was designed by Cesar Pelli. The architect was Rafael Vinoly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | Associated Press
The first new galleries from a big expansion at the Cleveland Museum of Art will open to the public on June 27. The new galleries are part of an eight-year, $335-million renovation that will increase the museum's size by 50%. The expansion was designed by architect Rafael Vinoly, whose credits include convention centers in Pittsburgh and Boston, Philadelphia's major performing arts center and the Tokyo International Forum conference center....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Officials at Philadelphia's Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts and the acclaimed architect who designed it have reached an out-of-court settlement in a lawsuit accusing the firm of bad design work and cost overruns. Neither side would release terms of the deal, which still requires a federal judge's approval. The lawsuit, filed in November against the firm of architect Rafael Vinoly, says the construction ended up costing $180 million -- "significantly more" than the $157 million budgeted.
NEWS
January 23, 2003 | Lee Margulies
Architect Rafael Vinoly of New York was named Wednesday to design two buildings on the eight-acre plaza in front of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. The intention is to create more space for exhibitions and educational programs and to make the site more accessible to pedestrians. Vinoly was the architect for the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia and the Tokyo International Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
It was in the 1940s that economics student Raymond Nasher first decided that Duke University needed an art museum. More than 60 years later, the student who became a Dallas real estate tycoon made it happen. Duke's Nasher Museum of Art opens to the public this weekend in Durham, N.C. Nasher donated $10 million to fund construction of the $23-million museum, designed by architect Rafael Vinoly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
Officials at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia have sued the building's internationally acclaimed architect, accusing the firm of "deficient and defective design work" and of delays that boosted the project's final cost. The lawsuit filed in U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2002 | SCOTT TIMBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans for the World Trade Center site grew more focused this week as the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. selected six teams of architects and planners--among them designers of the Getty Center, Berlin's Jewish Museum, and the Museum of Modern Art, Queens--to come up with new proposals for the 16-acre site. The six designs will be narrowed to three by year's end, and a final proposal--which could combine elements of several plans--will be released in spring 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Rafael Vinoly landed on the short list of the world's most hotly pursued architects in 1989, when he defeated 394 contenders in an international competition to design the Tokyo International Forum. The $1.5-billion performing arts and convention center -- a huge glass and steel structure frequently described as a great ship gliding through the central city -- opened in 1997 to widespread acclaim.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2005 | Mike Boehm
When Philadelphia's Verizon Hall opened in 2001, acoustician Russell Johnson described it as a "sister hall" of the one he was working on at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Now, on the heels of a report by Johnson's own firm detailing some expensive-to-fix sound problems at Verizon, backers of the Orange County hall, due to open in fall 2006, are saying the two auditoriums are more like cousins, twice or thrice removed. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
One of the seven architectural teams vying to redesign the World Trade Center site has been dropped from the competition, a move prompted by the withdrawal of one of the team's key members, industry giant Skidmore Owings & Merrill. Along with Skidmore, its many teammates on the effort, including Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan, have been removed from contention -- action that insiders said came as a surprise to some team members. The flurry of activity began with a Dec.
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