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Rafe Esquith

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OPINION
October 29, 2000
Re "The Play's the Thing; $100,000 Is OK, Too," Oct. 24: I was so thrilled to see the article about [fifth-grade teacher] Rafe Esquith, because it reinforced two things I know to be true about inner-city education in Los Angeles--we have excited and inspiring teachers, and our students are hungry and thrilled to be challenged. I have only been teaching in Los Angeles about five years, but day in and day out I see remarkable and inspiring teachers who challenge and bring out the best in their students.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Even as the annual state testing season bore down on her this spring, fourth-grade teacher Jin Yi barely bothered with test prep materials. The Hobart Boulevard Elementary School teacher used to spend weeks with practice tests but found they bored her students. Instead, she engages them with hands-on lessons, such as measuring their arms and comparing that data to solve above-grade-level subtraction problems. "I used to spend time on test prep because I felt pressured to do it," said Yi, who attended Hobart in Koreatown herself and returned a decade ago to teach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
Everyday we hear and read of the failures of our schools. I have just witnessed a dramatic success. At an inner-city school--Hobart Elementary--I saw a remarkable performance of "Twelve Angry People." The students almost all have accents, Spanish, various Asian languages, but they understand and convey the meaning of the speeches. A gifted and dedicated young teacher, Rafe Esquith, each year produces remarkable plays. The audience is as mixed as the performers. I don't know any of the students at the school, but I go to the performances each year for the pure joy of seeing students excel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2007 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
RAFE ESQUITH'S classroom is dingy and cluttered, but it hardly matters. Within seconds inside it, it becomes clear why Esquith has been anointed as one of those magical teachers who propels his poor, immigrant students to impossible heights. In under an hour on a recent Tuesday, his fifth graders, many of whom speak with traces of Korean or Spanish accents, recited from memory the opening scene of Shakespeare's "Macbeth." They played "Riders on the Storm" on guitar, keyboard and drums.
NEWS
December 7, 1992
A Los Angeles elementary schoolteacher was named the nation's outstanding teacher of 1992 and won $25,000 during an awards ceremony Sunday at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood. Hobart Elementary School instructor Rafe Esquith won top honors for his work with gifted fifth- and sixth-graders in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles. Esquith helps the children stage Shakespearean plays and teaches them about classical music, fine literature and algebraic equations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
'And what are the three words that set the scene?" teacher Rafe Esquith asked his class in a discussion about "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain. "Huck says, 'They're after us.' He says 'us' because there's a connection between Huck and Jim." But what connection, Esquith asked as he paced around the crammed classroom on Monday morning, his students attentive with raised hands and eager eyes. One answered: "Jim took care of Huck. Jim saved him from the storm."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Even as the annual state testing season bore down on her this spring, fourth-grade teacher Jin Yi barely bothered with test prep materials. The Hobart Boulevard Elementary School teacher used to spend weeks with practice tests but found they bored her students. Instead, she engages them with hands-on lessons, such as measuring their arms and comparing that data to solve above-grade-level subtraction problems. "I used to spend time on test prep because I felt pressured to do it," said Yi, who attended Hobart in Koreatown herself and returned a decade ago to teach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1992 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It is still dark at 6 a.m. when sixth-grader Henry Artign sets out for the eight-block walk from his Koreatown home, past the hulks of burned-out stores, to the campus of Hobart Elementary. When he arrives at Room 52, his teacher, Rafe Esquith, is already there, preparing for a school day that will not end until the sun goes down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2002 | Arianne Aryanpur, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- Next April, as they do each spring, Rafe Esquith's fifth- and sixth-grade students at Hobart Boulevard Elementary School west of downtown Los Angeles will perform Shakespeare in their street clothes. And as in other years, Academy Award-nominated actor Sir Ian McKellen plans to be there to watch. McKellen, who recently played Gandalf in "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," comes to see 11- and 12-year-old kids spout Shakespeare.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2007 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
RAFE ESQUITH'S classroom is dingy and cluttered, but it hardly matters. Within seconds inside it, it becomes clear why Esquith has been anointed as one of those magical teachers who propels his poor, immigrant students to impossible heights. In under an hour on a recent Tuesday, his fifth graders, many of whom speak with traces of Korean or Spanish accents, recited from memory the opening scene of Shakespeare's "Macbeth." They played "Riders on the Storm" on guitar, keyboard and drums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2002 | Arianne Aryanpur, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- Next April, as they do each spring, Rafe Esquith's fifth- and sixth-grade students at Hobart Boulevard Elementary School west of downtown Los Angeles will perform Shakespeare in their street clothes. And as in other years, Academy Award-nominated actor Sir Ian McKellen plans to be there to watch. McKellen, who recently played Gandalf in "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," comes to see 11- and 12-year-old kids spout Shakespeare.
OPINION
October 29, 2000
Re "The Play's the Thing; $100,000 Is OK, Too," Oct. 24: I was so thrilled to see the article about [fifth-grade teacher] Rafe Esquith, because it reinforced two things I know to be true about inner-city education in Los Angeles--we have excited and inspiring teachers, and our students are hungry and thrilled to be challenged. I have only been teaching in Los Angeles about five years, but day in and day out I see remarkable and inspiring teachers who challenge and bring out the best in their students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
'And what are the three words that set the scene?" teacher Rafe Esquith asked his class in a discussion about "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain. "Huck says, 'They're after us.' He says 'us' because there's a connection between Huck and Jim." But what connection, Esquith asked as he paced around the crammed classroom on Monday morning, his students attentive with raised hands and eager eyes. One answered: "Jim took care of Huck. Jim saved him from the storm."
NEWS
December 7, 1992
A Los Angeles elementary schoolteacher was named the nation's outstanding teacher of 1992 and won $25,000 during an awards ceremony Sunday at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood. Hobart Elementary School instructor Rafe Esquith won top honors for his work with gifted fifth- and sixth-graders in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles. Esquith helps the children stage Shakespearean plays and teaches them about classical music, fine literature and algebraic equations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1992 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It is still dark at 6 a.m. when sixth-grader Henry Artign sets out for the eight-block walk from his Koreatown home, past the hulks of burned-out stores, to the campus of Hobart Elementary. When he arrives at Room 52, his teacher, Rafe Esquith, is already there, preparing for a school day that will not end until the sun goes down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
Everyday we hear and read of the failures of our schools. I have just witnessed a dramatic success. At an inner-city school--Hobart Elementary--I saw a remarkable performance of "Twelve Angry People." The students almost all have accents, Spanish, various Asian languages, but they understand and convey the meaning of the speeches. A gifted and dedicated young teacher, Rafe Esquith, each year produces remarkable plays. The audience is as mixed as the performers. I don't know any of the students at the school, but I go to the performances each year for the pure joy of seeing students excel.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, the PBS music series "Austin City Limits" and actor-turned-movie director Ron Howard are among the recipients of this year's National Medal of Arts, President Bush announced Wednesday.
OPINION
November 2, 2002
Re "L.A. Teacher Awarded British Honor," Oct. 29: Rafe Esquith's kids are as wonderful as he says. Last August we were in Ashland for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival the same time Esquith was there with about 40 youngsters. The children, responsible for their schedules, tickets, spending money and behavior, are organized in groups of four. When one such group saw a festival employee accidentally tip over a container while transferring trash, they ran across the street to pick up the mess.
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