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Raffi Hovannisian

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NEWS
October 17, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raffi Hovannisian, a Palisades High School graduate who as foreign minister of Armenia strove to put his tiny ancestral homeland back on the diplomatic map, resigned his post Friday at the request of the president of the former Soviet republic. "I leave this post with the sense that my work is incomplete," Hovannisian, 33, said in a statement. He said he had "a clean conscience" because he has stood by his "principles of diplomacy."
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NEWS
October 17, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raffi Hovannisian, a Palisades High School graduate who as foreign minister of Armenia strove to put his tiny ancestral homeland back on the diplomatic map, resigned his post Friday at the request of the president of the former Soviet republic. "I leave this post with the sense that my work is incomplete," Hovannisian, 33, said in a statement. He said he had "a clean conscience" because he has stood by his "principles of diplomacy."
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NEWS
September 29, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flash back 20 years. A pre-teen Raffi Hovannisian is complaining bitterly that he has to study Armenian instead of playing baseball with his Brentwood buddies. Flash back 10 years. Young Hovannisian has just graduated from Tufts University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in Medford, Mass., and has to decide between the two professions. He chooses law and moves up to a six-figure salary in Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flash back 20 years. A pre-teen Raffi Hovannisian is complaining bitterly that he has to study Armenian instead of playing baseball with his Brentwood buddies. Flash back 10 years. Young Hovannisian has just graduated from Tufts University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in Medford, Mass., and has to decide between the two professions. He chooses law and moves up to a six-figure salary in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1989
An Armenian-American organization has been given permission to open an office in Yerevan, the capital of Soviet Armenia, to assist efforts in rebuilding parts of the region devastated in the December earthquake, officials said Monday.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raffi Hovannisian, graduate of Palisades High School, UCLA, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Georgetown Law School and his family's home-taught school of ethnic pride, is set to take office Monday as foreign minister of Armenia. The landlocked republic is not quite independent of the Soviet Union, but Hovannisian, 32, a stocky, mustachioed, former high school football lineman--and class valedictorian--is working on it.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raffi Hovannisian, graduate of Palisades High School, UCLA, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Georgetown Law School and his family's home-taught school of ethnic pride, is set to take office Nov. 11 as foreign minister of Armenia. The landlocked republic is not quite independent of the Soviet Union, but Hovannisian, 32, a stocky, mustachioed, former high school football lineman--and class valedictorian--is working on it.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
The republic of Armenia passed a declaration of independence today and Estonia began formal negotiations with Kremlin officials on separation, bringing the Soviet Union closer to fragmentation. Armenia, a republic of 3.3 million people on the border with Turkey and Iran, is the fifth of the 15 Soviet republics to move toward complete independence from Moscow.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another Southern Californian has been recruited by the Republic of Armenia as the young country labors to develop a free-market economy. Sebouh (Steve) Tashjian, 56, manager of cost engineering for Southern California Edison Co., will become Armenia's first minister of energy and fuels Feb. 9. And he unabashedly hopes to build business between his ethnic and adopted homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1994
A former foreign minister of Armenia describes that country as a "buffer state" and advises the Clinton Administration to achieve an American vision of peace in the area through a "political and economic commitment" to Armenia (Commentary, Feb. 25). Armenia, in return, he thinks, can help stop potential Russian imperial aspirations in the region, and help balance pan-turanist impulses within Turkey. Armenia will not be a valuable partner for regional peace with the United States if Armenian politicians try to sell Armenia to U.S. administrations as some kind of chess piece destined to counterbalance geopolitical forces and regional powers in the Transcaucasus.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Western alliance that won the Cold War, is struggling to carve out a new mission for itself--a mission that some members said Tuesday should be as a military peacekeeper for all of Europe, both East and West. The alliance on Tuesday welcomed all but one of the republics of the former Soviet Union--the remnants of the superpower that NATO was formed to resist--into a new security body, the North Atlantic Cooperation Council.
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- An Armenian presidential candidate was wounded in a shooting attack Thursday night that disrupted campaigning in the former Soviet republic less than three weeks before the election. Paruyr Hayrikyan of the moderate opposition National Self-Determination Union party was about to enter his house in Yerevan, the capital, about midnight when a stranger approached him from behind, a party spokesman said. The 63-year-old politician was fired at twice as he turned to face his attacker.
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