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Raffles Hotel

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NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Anne Harnagel, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The storied Raffles Hotel in Singapore , which over the decades has welcomed the raffish (Charlie Chaplin) and the revered (Queen Elizabeth II), is celebrating its 125 th birthday on Sept. 16.  Those with deep pockets who want to join the festivities can book Raffles' "Time to Celebrate" luxury package (for $40K), which includes two nights in the Presidential Suite, airport transfers in the hotel Bentley, a pair of engraved Jaeger-LeCoultre commemorative watches and two tickets to the fancy dress dinner on Saturday or dinner for two in the Bar & Billiard Room.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
In Singapore , guests view paintings by emerging artists; in Cambodia , they can catch a puppet show; in the Seychelles , they see work by a painter, the only one on the island of Praslin.   It's all part of the local art scene on display at the nine Raffles Hotels & Resorts . “Art is very much in the DNA of Raffles,” said Diana Banks, vice president of sales and marketing. “We encourage our hotels and our hotel partners to develop a concept for their art collection that reflects local culture, and to be in character with Raffles' nature of authenticity and individuality.” The hotel group, which was launched in 1887 in Singapore, comprises several hotels based in Asia and the Middle East and one in Paris.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | From Reuters
Singapore's famous 103-year-old Raffles Hotel, white-walled colonial birthplace of the Singapore Sling cocktail, accepted its last guest today before closing for a two-year face-lift. "It's the end of an era," said Raffles Manager Roberto Pregarz, who with the hotel's staff of 300 will be laid off until it reopens in 1991.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Anne Harnagel, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The storied Raffles Hotel in Singapore , which over the decades has welcomed the raffish (Charlie Chaplin) and the revered (Queen Elizabeth II), is celebrating its 125 th birthday on Sept. 16.  Those with deep pockets who want to join the festivities can book Raffles' "Time to Celebrate" luxury package (for $40K), which includes two nights in the Presidential Suite, airport transfers in the hotel Bentley, a pair of engraved Jaeger-LeCoultre commemorative watches and two tickets to the fancy dress dinner on Saturday or dinner for two in the Bar & Billiard Room.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | KENNETH L. WHITING, Associated Press
It's the kind of place Englishmen left to join mad dogs in the noonday sun or perhaps strike out on the road to Mandalay. The more sensible sat around sipping Singapore Slings. It's Raffles Hotel, which has survived for 102 years--ceiling fans still whirring, grillwork elevator clanking up and down, dark paneling and long corridors with creaking floors, wide verandas and elderly waiters shuffling around the Palm Court garden.
TRAVEL
May 10, 1987 | MICHAEL CARLTON, Carlton is a Denver Post travel columnist
Rocketing upward, encased in steel, you take 36 seconds to reach the top of the world's tallest hotel. The elevator's rapid rise pops your ears about halfway into the journey. When you reach the top of Raffles City, 73 stories above the simmering sidewalks of Singapore, you can see three countries: Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. You can look over much of the island of Singapore, where high-rises sprout like weeds, poking into air as humid as a lily pond.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2005 | John Burton, Financial Times
Founded by four Armenian brothers, home to Japanese army officers during World War II and previously owned by several local banks, the 118-year-old Raffles Hotel reflects the cosmopolitan nature of Singapore. So it is perhaps not surprising that Raffles is being sold to a Los Angeles-based private equity fund, Colony Capital, in spite of its iconic status for many Singaporeans.
TRAVEL
April 26, 1992
On the reopening of the Raffles Hotel, I did have one observation that apparently escaped the notice of the Guidebook. It says, "The Raffles Hotel . . . is at 11 Beach Road near the west end of the Orchard Road shopping district in downtown Singapore." My recollections of Singapore suggest that the Raffles Hotel is, in fact, at the east, south or maybe more accurately, the southeast end of the Orchard Road shopping district. ROBERT D. PARKER Escondido
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Luxury passenger rail company  Eastern & Oriental Express offers a seven-day trip from Singapore to Bangkok with some off-the-radar stops and excursions in Malaysia and Thailand. Fables of the Hills starts at Singapore's train station and includes visits to Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), tea plantations in the Cameron Highlands (Malaysia), the island of Penang (Malaysia), the "monkey training college" in Surat Thani (Thailand), where monkeys learn how to pick coconuts, and the famed River Kwai bridge (Thailand)
TRAVEL
January 20, 1991 | S.S. and H.B.
How to get there: Daily flights from Los Angeles via Tokyo to Singapore are available on the following airlines. Singapore Airlines has seven-day advance-purchase economy round-trip ticket costing $1,100 on Monday through Thursday. United and Japan airlines also offer seven-day advance-purchase tickets for Monday through Thursday at $1,283. All tickets carry a $16 tax.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Luxury passenger rail company  Eastern & Oriental Express offers a seven-day trip from Singapore to Bangkok with some off-the-radar stops and excursions in Malaysia and Thailand. Fables of the Hills starts at Singapore's train station and includes visits to Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), tea plantations in the Cameron Highlands (Malaysia), the island of Penang (Malaysia), the "monkey training college" in Surat Thani (Thailand), where monkeys learn how to pick coconuts, and the famed River Kwai bridge (Thailand)
NEWS
November 25, 2010 | By Benoit Lebourgeois, Special to the Los Angeles Times
'Tis the season to be jolly for affluent travelers headed to Paris with the opening Dec. 17 of a new Shangri-La Hotel in the capital’s tony 16 th arrondissement . The Hong Kong hotel group’s inaugural foray into the luxury European market comes two months after the Royal Monceau reopened as a Raffles hotel. (Fans of the Peninsula and Mandarin Oriental will have to wait into next year or beyond to stay at Paris outposts of those brands.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | Tanalee Smith, Associated Press Writer
It is easy to see Singapore's role as a modern business hub when looking at its skyscraper skyline, homogeneous public housing and resort-style condominiums. But this tiny Southeast Asian nation has a colorful, multicultural past that is still evident in scattered pockets of older districts that escaped redevelopment, and the government is working to ensure that history doesn't disappear.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2005 | John Burton, Financial Times
Founded by four Armenian brothers, home to Japanese army officers during World War II and previously owned by several local banks, the 118-year-old Raffles Hotel reflects the cosmopolitan nature of Singapore. So it is perhaps not surprising that Raffles is being sold to a Los Angeles-based private equity fund, Colony Capital, in spite of its iconic status for many Singaporeans.
FOOD
November 10, 2004 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
At the century-old Raffles Hotel in Singapore, high tea is so popular that a line forms outside the Tiffin Room at tea time. Now Angelenos can enjoy some of the same confections served at Raffles at a small pastry shop called Jin Patisserie in Venice. There, Singaporean Kristy Choo, a hard-working young pastry chef who formerly worked at Raffles, is bringing her own creative twist to the British colonial tradition.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | Regan Morris, Associated Press Writer
The first thing I noticed when I rode into downtown Singapore at 3 a.m. was the garbage-strewn field -- cans, cigarette butts, gutted cartons of take-away food. Could this be Singapore? Squeaky-clean, litter-at-your-peril Singapore, where even chewing gum is outlawed? The answer would come soon enough, and like much about Singapore over the next five years, it would surprise me.
NEWS
November 25, 2010 | By Benoit Lebourgeois, Special to the Los Angeles Times
'Tis the season to be jolly for affluent travelers headed to Paris with the opening Dec. 17 of a new Shangri-La Hotel in the capital’s tony 16 th arrondissement . The Hong Kong hotel group’s inaugural foray into the luxury European market comes two months after the Royal Monceau reopened as a Raffles hotel. (Fans of the Peninsula and Mandarin Oriental will have to wait into next year or beyond to stay at Paris outposts of those brands.
FOOD
September 23, 1998 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frangipani trees drop perfumed blossoms at my feet as I stroll toward the entrance of the Raffles Hotel. A tourist snapping photos of the doorman wears a pith helmet called a topee, which once shaded British planters from the noonday sun. It's night now, so the topee is as out of place as the man's chartreuse shorts and black and white running shoes.
TRAVEL
April 26, 1992
I read with sadness the article about the Raffles Hotel. In September, 1989, I was traveling alone with a tour group staying at a hotel within walking distance of the Raffles. One afternoon, without mentioning the real reason, I asked several friends in our group if they would like to join me and have a famous Singapore Sling at the Raffles. As we raised our glasses for a toast, I said, "Let's celebrate my birthday today." The waiter immediately heard and quickly announced to everyone in the bar area to join in wishing me, a visitor from the Los Angeles area, a happy birthday.
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