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Rafidah Aziz

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BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The predictable question came, and clear-talking Rafidah Aziz fired back with unexpected vitriol. An environmentalist "investment adviser" had risen in the audience and asked Rafidah, Malaysia's minister of international trade and industry, whether it would be conscionable to let clients invest in Malaysian industry when the country had a deplorable track record of exploiting its rain forests and oppressing the indigenous tribes that live in them.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The predictable question came, and clear-talking Rafidah Aziz fired back with unexpected vitriol. An environmentalist "investment adviser" had risen in the audience and asked Rafidah, Malaysia's minister of international trade and industry, whether it would be conscionable to let clients invest in Malaysian industry when the country had a deplorable track record of exploiting its rain forests and oppressing the indigenous tribes that live in them.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Malaysia is mounting an aggressive move to reach out to business worldwide. Next year, the country will begin exporting its first car to the United States. And Malaysia's production lines can't keep up with the big worldwide demand for their rubber gloves in the wake of AIDS. The country, which had followed a "look East" policy to emulate the Japanese and Korean work ethic and management systems, is now looking to the West to shore up its economy and provide jobs.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Malaysia is mounting an aggressive move to reach out to business worldwide. Next year, the country will begin exporting its first car to the United States. And Malaysia's production lines can't keep up with the big worldwide demand for their rubber gloves in the wake of AIDS. The country, which had followed a "look East" policy to emulate the Japanese and Korean work ethic and management systems, is now looking to the West to shore up its economy and provide jobs.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Anti-Dumping Law to Be Introduced: Malaysia will soon introduce an anti-dumping law to protect its industries against unfair trading practices by foreign competitors, according to the Star and New Straits Times. In making the announcement, Minister of International Trade and Industry Rafidah Aziz said Malaysian exporters can also expect to face more dumping allegations and investigations.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1991 | Times staff and wire reports
MALAYSIA: The government is expected to continue efforts to organize a new East Asian economic association, despite U.S. objections. Prime Minister Mahathir Mohomad last December called for formation of a larger Asian trading bloc to counter trade restrictions by Western nations should international trade talks involving the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade fail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993
The one head of state of an Asia-Pacific nation boycotting the meeting with President Clinton in Seattle this weekend is Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohammed. He will be missing from an unprecedented meeting of a dozen other Asia-Pacific heads of state to discuss regional issues (New Zealand's Jim Bolger is staying home because of election limbo).
REAL ESTATE
December 11, 1988 | BARNETT SUSSMAN, Barnett Sussman is a Times real estate writer. and
Look for a modest but steady increase in Southern California real estate investments by Malaysians, with initial emphasis on the hotel and service sector. That's the forecast of Datin Paduka Rafidah Aziz, Malaysia's minister of trade and industry. While Rafidah has been in Los Angeles to meet with U.S. investors, encouraging them to open factories and buy real estate in the Southeast Asian country, she said her nation believes in free trade.
NEWS
February 26, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary display of official anger at foreign press coverage, Malaysia announced Friday that British companies will be banned from government contracts because of reports in Britain's media about official corruption in past business deals. Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, who announced the new policy at a press conference in Kuala Lumpur, said the government had canceled contracts with British firms in an Anglo-Japanese consortium building a $3.
NEWS
November 24, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed global pact slashing tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars' worth of "information technology" products--such as computers and telecommunications equipment--won unanimous endorsement Saturday from 18 Pacific Rim nations. The vaguely worded action, taken here at the annual summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, known as APEC, sets the stage for intense negotiations aimed at concluding such an agreement at a World Trade Organization meeting in Singapore next month.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malaysia's outspoken trade minister on Monday defended her government's decision to bail out several troubled companies such as the powerful Sime Bank, arguing that letting them go bankrupt would lead to increased joblessness, social instability and a slowdown of the nation's economic recovery.
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