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TRAVEL
June 13, 2010 | By Brian E. Clark, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Outfitters offer plenty of options, with trips that focus archaeology, wildlife photography, yoga and bluegrass music. After riding the rapids of more than a dozen major streams on three continents, Bruce Legernes was looking for something a little different for his next trip. It wasn't that he was bored. Whitewater outings are never a snooze. Blasting through big waves, pinballing down boulder gardens and paddling as though your life depends on missing a giant obstacle (in some cases, this could be true)
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OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Dennis Ross
President Obama will visit Saudi Arabia this week. Based on what I hear from key Saudis, he is in for a rough reception. Rarely have the Saudis been more skeptical about the United States, and if the president is to affect Saudi behavior, it is important for him to understand why. Fundamentally, the Saudis believe that America's friends and interests are under threat, and the U.S. response has ranged from indifference to accommodation. The Saudis see Iran trying to encircle them with its Quds Force active in Bahrain, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and their own eastern province.
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SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Amina Khan
When facing oncoming floodwaters, ants use their helpless babies as floating life-preservers - by sticking them at the very bottom of the life rafts that they build with their own bodies. The findings, described in a paper published in PLOS One, reveal that ant-rafts have a fascinating internal structure - one that maximizes the group's buoyancy and thus, their chances of survival. But it does so by putting the young ant brood at the very bottom of the boat, exposed to hungry fish and the potential risk of drowning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Warning that truancy has reached a crisis level in California elementary schools, state Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris and half a dozen lawmakers proposed a raft of bills Monday aimed at keeping kids in school. Harris said 30% of elementary school students were truant in the 2012-13 school year. "California's Constitution guarantees our children the right to an education, yet our elementary schools face a truancy crisis," Harris said. "When children in kindergarten through sixth grade miss school, they fall behind and too many never catch up. " A child is considered truant after missing school or being tardy by more than 30 minutes without a valid excuse on three occasions during a school year.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | Associated Press
Five Cubans, adrift for five days on a homemade raft of inner tubes, were rescued at sea today by a passing tugboat named Liberty about 40 miles from Key West, the U.S. Coast Guard reported. "They had no food or water on the trip," said spokeswoman Brenda Toledo. "They were suffering from exposure, but they're in fairly good condition." The Liberty picked up the men shortly after 7 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2012 | By Meredith Blake, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Ang Lee, the famously meticulous director of "Life of Pi," originally had planned to hire a survival consultant to infuse the allegorical tale of a boy's oceangoing raft journey with a tiger with a dose of realism. Then he read Steven Callahan's riveting 1986 memoir, "Adrift," detailing his own perilous life-raft adventure in the Atlantic. In Callahan, Ang and screenwriter David Magee saw a guide who understood and could articulate the metaphysical themes they were hoping to explore in the film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2013 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State lawmakers, back from their summer break and starting their final month in session, have a lengthy to-do list that features such politically volatile issues as environmental rules, gun control and immigration. Some 1,100 bills - about 275 a week, or 55 a day - require action before the Legislature adjourns Sept. 13 if they are to become law by the beginning of next year. Among them are proposals to relax California's landmark environmental quality law; place restrictions on the controversial oil extraction method known as fracking; and grant new benefits to those in the country illegally.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | Associated Press
Five Cubans, adrift since Sunday on a raft made of inner tubes, were rescued Wednesday about 40 miles from Key West, Fla., by a tugboat, the U.S. Coast Guard said. The men, reported in good condition, were interviewed by Immigration and Naturalization Service officials and were to be reunited with relatives in Miami.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A dozen Cubans tried to cross the Gulf of Mexico in a raft but ran into trouble about 300 miles south of New Orleans, the Coast Guard reported. Two died, two were missing and six were admitted to a hospital near New Orleans. The remaining two were on the Coast Guard cutter that rescued them. A Mexican naval vessel and a Coast Guard airplane were searching for the missing people. The crew of the 800-foot tanker Eos reported Friday that the raft was in trouble and that some people were in the water.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
A 17-year-old was sentenced to 30 years in prison Saturday for fatally shooting a rafter on the Rio Grande last year. Eduardo Rodriguez Pineda, a Mexican citizen who resides legally in the United States, was convicted Friday. Authorities said Rodriguez was one of four youths who stood atop 300-foot-high canyon walls overlooking the river on Nov. 19, 1988, and fired shots that struck and killed Michael Heffley, 40, of Eastland. His wife, Jamie, and their rafting guide were wounded.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Amina Khan
When facing oncoming floodwaters, ants use their helpless babies as floating life-preservers - by sticking them at the very bottom of the life rafts that they build with their own bodies. The findings, described in a paper published in PLOS One, reveal that ant-rafts have a fascinating internal structure - one that maximizes the group's buoyancy and thus, their chances of survival. But it does so by putting the young ant brood at the very bottom of the boat, exposed to hungry fish and the potential risk of drowning.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Women who like rugged vacations and the healing side of yoga will appreciate this five-day rafting trip on Utah's Green River that goes beyond a standard yoga retreat. Utah-based Holiday River Expeditions designed the women-only journey down Desolation Canyon for those of all abilities and ages seeking "personalized wellness and lifestyle counseling. " Deanna English , a registered nurse and yoga therapist, leads the trip, which teaches participants the therapeutic side of yoga, breathing, good nutrition and more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2013 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State lawmakers, back from their summer break and starting their final month in session, have a lengthy to-do list that features such politically volatile issues as environmental rules, gun control and immigration. Some 1,100 bills - about 275 a week, or 55 a day - require action before the Legislature adjourns Sept. 13 if they are to become law by the beginning of next year. Among them are proposals to relax California's landmark environmental quality law; place restrictions on the controversial oil extraction method known as fracking; and grant new benefits to those in the country illegally.
TRAVEL
June 16, 2013 | By April Orcutt
Despite the drought that plagued Southern California last winter, river rafters can still get their paddles wet: Parts of Northern California and other Western states got the rain and snow that missed SoCal. California's Kings, Kern, Kaweah, Merced and Tuolumne rivers have shortened or nonexistent rafting seasons this year, thanks to the drought, but many rivers in the West have plenty of water for rafting, kayaking and tubing. Here's a sampling of outfitters that are running rafting trips on rivers in Northern California and the West as well as on other rivers predicted to have good flows through August and maybe even September.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
In Moab, Utah , it's all about the desert. The small town on the edge of Arches National Park is the stepping-off point for remote canyons, amazing red-rock formations and a desert vibe best summed up in Edward Abbey's "Desert Solitaire. " An outfit called the Moab Adventure Center that specializes in desert doings offers a four-day Southwest Sampler designed as an introduction to the area. Participants spend two nights at the Gonzo Inn and spend one day touring the town and another hiking in the park to see some of the more than 2,000 sandstone arches.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Visitors to southern Nevada can immerse themselves in history and enjoy rafting on the Colorado River Exploration Tour , the latest Las Vegas-area offering from Forever Resorts . The full-day adventure first takes guests to Eldorado Canyon, near the village of Nelson, about 40 miles southeast of the Las Vegas Strip. Visitors take a one-hour tour of the Techatticup Mine , where gold was mined for more than 80 years from 1861 until the start of World War II. A coach then takes tourists down a winding road to Nelson's Landing on the Colorado River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1985 | RICHARD M. HARNETT, United Press International
Ruthanne Lum McCunn, an Amerasian educated in Chinese, British and American schools, is particularly qualified to write the story of Poon Lim, a Chinese sailor who survived 133 days adrift in the Atlantic after his ship was sunk during World War II. The author has written two other books about Chinese, and is currently working on a fourth. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Poon's ordeal on a raft with a small supply of food and water, is the longest on record.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
For a long time, the people who launched themselves down whitewater rapids were stupid or crazy or courageous. Without a clue as to what might lie around the next bend, men like the bearded, one-armed explorer John Wesley Powell would ride wooden dories, full-speed-ahead-and-damn-the-waterfalls, down rivers such as the Colorado. That people would die was a given--the price of purposeful adventure. After World War II, a handful of recreational thrill seekers decided that the adrenaline high of rodeo rapids was worth the clear threat to life and limb.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Brian E. Clark
Outdoor enthusiasts headed for British Columbia this summer can get a 20% discount if they sign up with Sunwolf for midweek rafting and family adventure outings on the Elaho and Cheakamus rivers near Squamish.  Called the "Elaho River Experience” and the “Family Scenic Float,” these midweek deals include a rafting trip, one night's accommodation in a riverside cabin and a barbecue. With the discount, the packages start at $264 for two. Sunwolf is in the heart of British Columbia's Coast Mountains at the confluence of the Cheakamus and Cheekye rivers, 45 minutes from downtown Vancouver and 30 minutes from the Whistler resort.
TRAVEL
May 5, 2013 | By Jeff Greenwald
MAE WANG, Thailand - As we sat together on a long, narrow raft of bamboo, Alexa Pham dipped her hand into the quickly moving river. "It's the really simple things," she said with a long breath, "that make it beautiful here in Mae Wang. " Two wiry boatmen, steering with long poles, navigated the raft beneath the branches of overhanging trees, around boulders and through bars of late-afternoon sunlight. The men are part of Pham's staff, hired from the hill tribes and Burmese refugee communities of northern Thailand.
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