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Rahat Ali Khan

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January 23, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pakistani singer Rahat Ali Khan must feel like a prince waiting to be crowned king. The 24-year-old musician (who performs Wednesday at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana) is the nephew of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, the vaunted qawwali vocalist known for his ability to send audiences into states of spiritual and physical ecstasy. For 600 years, the art of qawwali--a sacred music of Sufism, a mystical Islamic sect--has been passed down through the male members of the Ali Khan clan.
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September 3, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes about world music for The Times
As he reaches out to shake hands, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan does not exactly look like the successor to "the voice from heaven," his uncle, legendary qawwali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. Small, round-faced and smiling, wearing jeans and a sweatshirt as he stands in the lobby of a Los Angeles Holiday Inn Express, Khan has the demeanor of an ordinary Pakistani in his middle 20s. The age is right--he's 25--and the country's correct, but he is anything but ordinary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times jazz writer
The mantle of responsibility was handed to qawwali singer Rahat Fateh Ali Khan this month with unexpected suddenness. On Aug. 16, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, his mentor, guru and uncle, died of coronary failure in a London hospital. The unexpected passing of the younger Khan's musical role model was almost overwhelming. A few days later, still in tears, Rahat Khan, 24, long designated as Nusrat Khan's successor, could only say, "He left me with a very big responsibility."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes about world music for The Times
As he reaches out to shake hands, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan does not exactly look like the successor to "the voice from heaven," his uncle, legendary qawwali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. Small, round-faced and smiling, wearing jeans and a sweatshirt as he stands in the lobby of a Los Angeles Holiday Inn Express, Khan has the demeanor of an ordinary Pakistani in his middle 20s. The age is right--he's 25--and the country's correct, but he is anything but ordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times jazz writer
The mantle of responsibility was handed to qawwali singer Rahat Fateh Ali Khan this month with unexpected suddenness. On Aug. 16, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, his mentor, guru and uncle, died of coronary failure in a London hospital. The unexpected passing of the younger Khan's musical role model was almost overwhelming. A few days later, still in tears, Rahat Khan, 24, long designated as Nusrat Khan's successor, could only say, "He left me with a very big responsibility."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1997
Pakistani singer Rahat Ali Khan's concert tonight at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana has been postponed because of visa complications that delayed his entry into the United States, according to a club spokeswoman. The show has been rescheduled for Wednesday. Information: (714) 957-0600.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan was a missionary. Not a proselytizing promoter of a particular spiritual view of the world; not even an outright spokesman for the Sufi religion in which he was raised. Khan's mission, in his own words, was to spread "a message of peace and love by singing from the depth of my heart." And he did so with a great passion. Khan was the first and most successful performer to bring the Sufi devotional music known as qawwali to the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1998
The Barn Folk Concert Series at UC Riverside will end its 19-year run with an all-day Farewell Festival featuring artists who have made a significant contribution to British and American traditional music. Featured artist Eric Bogle, whose 1972 antiwar song "And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda" is Australia's most-recorded song, will perform at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pakistani singer Rahat Ali Khan must feel like a prince waiting to be crowned king. The 24-year-old musician (who performs Wednesday at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana) is the nephew of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, the vaunted qawwali vocalist known for his ability to send audiences into states of spiritual and physical ecstasy. For 600 years, the art of qawwali--a sacred music of Sufism, a mystical Islamic sect--has been passed down through the male members of the Ali Khan clan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lot of people talked about Pakistani qawwali star Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who died of coronary arrest in London on Aug. 16, as the new Bob Marley. Indeed, though his music--a 6-centuries-old tradition of Sufi poetry and Eastern classical singing--was much further outside Western pop than Marley's reggae, he was leading a global rise of the style.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes about jazz and world music for The Times
How's this for a switch? On Wednesday, St. Patrick's Day, the featured artists at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts will be Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Not exactly what one would ordinarily expect to hear on the day of the wearin' of the green? But there is, nonetheless, an unexpected linkage between the African a cappella vocal group and the ancient Celtic holiday.
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