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Rahat Fateh Ali Khan

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September 3, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes about world music for The Times
As he reaches out to shake hands, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan does not exactly look like the successor to "the voice from heaven," his uncle, legendary qawwali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. Small, round-faced and smiling, wearing jeans and a sweatshirt as he stands in the lobby of a Los Angeles Holiday Inn Express, Khan has the demeanor of an ordinary Pakistani in his middle 20s. The age is right--he's 25--and the country's correct, but he is anything but ordinary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes about world music for The Times
As he reaches out to shake hands, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan does not exactly look like the successor to "the voice from heaven," his uncle, legendary qawwali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. Small, round-faced and smiling, wearing jeans and a sweatshirt as he stands in the lobby of a Los Angeles Holiday Inn Express, Khan has the demeanor of an ordinary Pakistani in his middle 20s. The age is right--he's 25--and the country's correct, but he is anything but ordinary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan was a missionary. Not a proselytizing promoter of a particular spiritual view of the world; not even an outright spokesman for the Sufi religion in which he was raised. Khan's mission, in his own words, was to spread "a message of peace and love by singing from the depth of my heart." And he did so with a great passion. Khan was the first and most successful performer to bring the Sufi devotional music known as qawwali to the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lot of people talked about Pakistani qawwali star Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who died of coronary arrest in London on Aug. 16, as the new Bob Marley. Indeed, though his music--a 6-centuries-old tradition of Sufi poetry and Eastern classical singing--was much further outside Western pop than Marley's reggae, he was leading a global rise of the style.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lot of people talked about Pakistani qawwali star Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who died of coronary arrest in London on Aug. 16, as the new Bob Marley. Indeed, though his music--a 6-centuries-old tradition of Sufi poetry and Eastern classical singing--was much further outside Western pop than Marley's reggae, he was leading a global rise of the style.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times jazz writer
The mantle of responsibility was handed to qawwali singer Rahat Fateh Ali Khan this month with unexpected suddenness. On Aug. 16, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, his mentor, guru and uncle, died of coronary failure in a London hospital. The unexpected passing of the younger Khan's musical role model was almost overwhelming. A few days later, still in tears, Rahat Khan, 24, long designated as Nusrat Khan's successor, could only say, "He left me with a very big responsibility."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1998 | JERRY CROWE
* Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder, below, will join Steve Earle, Ani DiFranco, Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Michelle Shocked and Rahat Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, among others, for a "Dead Man Walking" benefit concert March 29 at the Shrine Auditorium. Tickets go on sale Sunday. . . . Tickets will be available Saturday for Mary J. Blige and Usher, April 9 at the Universal Amphitheatre. . . . Tickets are on sale now for the Mariachi USA Festival, June 20-21 at the Hollywood Bowl. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000
10:30am & 1pm Theater California Artists Radio Theatre celebrates the 80th birthday of legendary sci-fi writer Ray Bradbury with "A Ray Bradbury Birthday Tribute," featuring performances of Bradbury's Irish play, "Anthem Sprinters"; his story "Silent Towns," from "The Martian Chronicles"; "The Sailor Home From the Seas," from his book "Machineries of Joy"; "The Ravine," his radio play from the 1950s radio series "Suspense"; and more. Bradbury will appear at the 1 p.m. show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It required one word to title Sunday's World Festival '99 concert at the Hollywood Bowl: "Hallelujah!" But it was a good one, and in principle a useful organizing theme for a concert devoted to the powerful energies in spiritual music from various parts of the globe. In practice, however, the program had a somewhat bifurcated quality. The first half, for example, had a quality that reached beyond language and into the use of spiritual music as the vehicle for an intense inner voyage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998
MOVIES "Lost in Space," inspired by the old TV series, is a science-fiction adventure about a family's ill-fated voyage aboard a sabotaged spaceship. Gary Oldman, William Hurt, Mimi Rogers and Matt LeBlanc star with otherworldly creatures and high-tech robots. The film opens Friday in general release.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times jazz writer
The mantle of responsibility was handed to qawwali singer Rahat Fateh Ali Khan this month with unexpected suddenness. On Aug. 16, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, his mentor, guru and uncle, died of coronary failure in a London hospital. The unexpected passing of the younger Khan's musical role model was almost overwhelming. A few days later, still in tears, Rahat Khan, 24, long designated as Nusrat Khan's successor, could only say, "He left me with a very big responsibility."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan was a missionary. Not a proselytizing promoter of a particular spiritual view of the world; not even an outright spokesman for the Sufi religion in which he was raised. Khan's mission, in his own words, was to spread "a message of peace and love by singing from the depth of my heart." And he did so with a great passion. Khan was the first and most successful performer to bring the Sufi devotional music known as qawwali to the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The World Festival of Sacred Music on Tuesday announced the loss of another of its best-known international attractions--a Syrian troupe of whirling dervishes--due to turmoil in the Middle East and stepped-up security precautions that have prompted U.S. consulates to delay or deny visas to performing artists from countries considered havens for terrorists. Two singers missed performances at the festival's opening Saturday. New, post-Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Los Angeles Philharmonic has added a number of significant events to the Hollywood Bowl's 78th annual summer festival, including a concert by folk singers Peter, Paul & Mary and a tribute to "South Pacific." The Philharmonic also has scheduled a series of free community concerts by the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, the Bowl's new jazz ensemble in residence.
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