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SPORTS
August 8, 2010 | By Diane Pucin and Lance Pugmire
The Raymond Fouquet Brentwood Grand Prix cycling race was won Sunday by Rahsaan Bahati, whose Bahati Racing team was disbanded in part because Floyd Landis was briefly part of it. Garmin-Transitions' Dave Zabriskie, who completed the Tour de France on July 25 and who has been accused by Landis of once participating in illegal doping while a member of the U.S. Postal Service team, was one of the 100 pros who competed for a total of $1,999 in...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mark Whitehead, a member of the U.S. track cycling team that participated in blood doping during the 1984 Summer Olympics, creating a scandal that led to the practice being banned from the sport, has died. He was 50. Whitehead died in Frisco, Texas, while attending the USA Cycling Junior Track National Championships, USA Cycling announced Wednesday . The organization said no further details were available. His 20 national championships included the team pursuit in 1984, which contributed to his being chosen for the U.S. squad that competed in the Los Angeles Games, the cycling website VeloNews reported . Encouraged by their coach — and less than a week before the Olympics — Whitehead and seven other members of the U.S. cycling team took "advantage of the dubious practice called blood boosting," David Wallechinsky wrote in "The Complete Book of the Olympics.
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SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Disgraced cyclist Floyd Landis, who triggered an uproar last week by accusing Lance Armstrong and other top riders of being involved in doping for years, on Friday found himself without a racing team. Rahsaan Bahati, a 28-year-old cyclist from Compton and founder of the Bahati Foundation cycling team, said Friday that Landis and Dr. Brent Kay, a longtime sponsor of Landis, were no longer associated with the team. Bahati cited Landis' behavior for the split and said he was particularly disturbed by e-mails from Landis to Amgen Tour of California director Andrew Messick that suggested that Kay's Ouch Sports Medical Center should be refunded the $40,000 it spent for a sponsorship tent at last Saturday's time trial after the Bahati team was not invited into the race.
SPORTS
August 8, 2010 | By Diane Pucin and Lance Pugmire
The Raymond Fouquet Brentwood Grand Prix cycling race was won Sunday by Rahsaan Bahati, whose Bahati Racing team was disbanded in part because Floyd Landis was briefly part of it. Garmin-Transitions' Dave Zabriskie, who completed the Tour de France on July 25 and who has been accused by Landis of once participating in illegal doping while a member of the U.S. Postal Service team, was one of the 100 pros who competed for a total of $1,999 in...
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | ARA MIA DI MASSA, Cara Mia Di Massa is an editor at the Los Angeles Times Book Review
It begins as a murmur, traveling through the crowds at cycling races from Santa Barbara to Brea, from Lompoc to La Mirada, and builds, inevitably, to a crescendo. Rahsaan's here! The men and women assembled, competitors and spectators, have noticed a racer riding a turquoise-and-blue bicycle and dressed in a stars-and-stripes jersey and American flag helmet. Amid athletes straining for advantage, the young man exudes a sort of anaerobic Zen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mark Whitehead, a member of the U.S. track cycling team that participated in blood doping during the 1984 Summer Olympics, creating a scandal that led to the practice being banned from the sport, has died. He was 50. Whitehead died in Frisco, Texas, while attending the USA Cycling Junior Track National Championships, USA Cycling announced Wednesday . The organization said no further details were available. His 20 national championships included the team pursuit in 1984, which contributed to his being chosen for the U.S. squad that competed in the Los Angeles Games, the cycling website VeloNews reported . Encouraged by their coach — and less than a week before the Olympics — Whitehead and seven other members of the U.S. cycling team took "advantage of the dubious practice called blood boosting," David Wallechinsky wrote in "The Complete Book of the Olympics.
SPORTS
June 30, 2008 | Chris Hine, Times Staff Writer
If Michael Ball, the chief executive of Rock Racing, has his way, cycling fans will see more skulls and crossbones at future races. In the last year, Rock Racing, known not only for its cryptic logo but also for its three team members allegedly linked to an ongoing doping investigation in Spain, has had trouble getting all of its riders into races.
SPORTS
June 27, 2009 | Staff And Wire Reports
Former Cleveland Browns receiver Joe Jurevicius sued the team and the Cleveland Clinic on Friday, saying the team misrepresented the cleanliness of its training facility and blaming doctors for what he called negligence over a staph infection in his right knee that kept him from playing last year. The lawsuit alleges that physicians Anthony Miniaci and Richard Figler failed to warn Jurevicius that therapy equipment was not always sanitized at the team's training facility in suburban Berea, Ohio.
SPORTS
April 21, 2002 | Diane Pucin
Team Major Taylor was booed and sued and left sponsorless. For the last month Josh Weir, lead rider for Team Major Taylor, the fifth all-minority team to qualify for the Little 500, the cycling race immortalized in the 1979 movie "Breaking Away," has heard himself called a cheater, a ringer, an outsider and some things that can't be printed. Upon introduction Saturday at Indiana University's Bill Armstrong Stadium, in front of a crowd of nearly 20,000, the riders of Team Major Taylor were booed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2005 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
The bicycle racers whipped around the course of the Redlands Classic at breathtaking speed -- a 30-minute exercise in going for broke. Their leg muscles burned from the exertion of the race on a tight criterium course around the heart of the picturesque city of Redlands, which has the San Bernardino Mountains as its backdrop. In the lead pack of cyclists was Justin Williams, the only black rider, who flashed around hairpin turns on his crimson racing bike.
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Disgraced cyclist Floyd Landis, who triggered an uproar last week by accusing Lance Armstrong and other top riders of being involved in doping for years, on Friday found himself without a racing team. Rahsaan Bahati, a 28-year-old cyclist from Compton and founder of the Bahati Foundation cycling team, said Friday that Landis and Dr. Brent Kay, a longtime sponsor of Landis, were no longer associated with the team. Bahati cited Landis' behavior for the split and said he was particularly disturbed by e-mails from Landis to Amgen Tour of California director Andrew Messick that suggested that Kay's Ouch Sports Medical Center should be refunded the $40,000 it spent for a sponsorship tent at last Saturday's time trial after the Bahati team was not invited into the race.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | ARA MIA DI MASSA, Cara Mia Di Massa is an editor at the Los Angeles Times Book Review
It begins as a murmur, traveling through the crowds at cycling races from Santa Barbara to Brea, from Lompoc to La Mirada, and builds, inevitably, to a crescendo. Rahsaan's here! The men and women assembled, competitors and spectators, have noticed a racer riding a turquoise-and-blue bicycle and dressed in a stars-and-stripes jersey and American flag helmet. Amid athletes straining for advantage, the young man exudes a sort of anaerobic Zen.
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