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Rahul Gandhi

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November 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Priyanshi Srivastava, a second-year student at the Footwear Development Design Institute here in Amethi, was quite taken with lawmaker Rahul Gandhi during his recent visit to the institute that he helped start. "I never expected he'd have such a deep knowledge about leather goods," Srivastava said of the scion of India's most famous political family. "And I never thought he'd be so damned handsome. " As campaigning for legislative assembly seats in the north-central state of Uttar Pradesh kicked off last week, Gandhi may hope other voters in India's most populous state have the same reaction.
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WORLD
November 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Priyanshi Srivastava, a second-year student at the Footwear Development Design Institute here in Amethi, was quite taken with lawmaker Rahul Gandhi during his recent visit to the institute that he helped start. "I never expected he'd have such a deep knowledge about leather goods," Srivastava said of the scion of India's most famous political family. "And I never thought he'd be so damned handsome. " As campaigning for legislative assembly seats in the north-central state of Uttar Pradesh kicked off last week, Gandhi may hope other voters in India's most populous state have the same reaction.
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WORLD
July 13, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
In a bid to jump-start a flagging government and move beyond persistent corruption scandals, India's ruling coalition Tuesday announced a Cabinet reshuffle. But analysts questioned whether the relatively modest changes would be enough to restore political momentum and burnish the image of the Congress Party and its allies. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announced new leaders for 13 ministries, mostly in the social welfare area, while leaving the four most powerful portfolios — defense, external affairs, finance and home — untouched.
WORLD
July 13, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
In a bid to jump-start a flagging government and move beyond persistent corruption scandals, India's ruling coalition Tuesday announced a Cabinet reshuffle. But analysts questioned whether the relatively modest changes would be enough to restore political momentum and burnish the image of the Congress Party and its allies. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announced new leaders for 13 ministries, mostly in the social welfare area, while leaving the four most powerful portfolios — defense, external affairs, finance and home — untouched.
WORLD
May 14, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Sonia Gandhi, the woman who Thursday staged one of India's memorable electoral comebacks, is a reluctant politician with a distaste for the rough and tumble of politics. Gandhi is said to have threatened to divorce her husband, Rajiv, after he decided to enter politics to succeed his assassinated mother and former prime minister, Indira Gandhi. After Rajiv's assassination in 1991, Sonia Gandhi became a virtual recluse. She avoided Indian politics and tried to shield her two children from it.
WORLD
June 22, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Most people in this farming region haul their water home in buckets. It's often so dirty it makes them sick. Their roads are rutted like washboards. Half the time, they have no electricity. For more than 25 years, this deprived district has been the Gandhi family's political finishing school, where the heirs of India's most privileged dynasty are groomed for power. Amethi's voters recently sent Rahul Gandhi, 34, to Parliament for the first time. His late uncle Sanjay once held the seat.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Indian nation watched with the silence of emptiness at sunset Friday while the old Brahmin high priest led Rahul Gandhi around his father's body seven times near the banks of the Yamuna River, where Rajiv Gandhi's remains lay, head to the south, under a pyramid of sandalwood sticks. The priest held an urn of flammable clarified butter while the 20-year-old Rahul dipped one stick seven times.
WORLD
December 19, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Leaked U.S. diplomatic cables have sparked a political battle in India, putting the ruling party on the defensive with their disclosures on alleged human rights violations and religious extremism. Most damaging to the Congress Party was a cable reporting that Rahul Gandhi, scion of India's first political family and pegged by many as the nation's next prime minister, told the U.S. ambassador last year that hard-line Hindu groups in India could be a bigger threat to the country than Pakistan-based Islamic militants.
WORLD
July 23, 2008 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
India's ruling coalition survived a confidence vote by a slim margin Tuesday, keeping alive the possibility that a controversial nuclear cooperation deal with the U.S. would go ahead as planned.
WORLD
June 10, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - In most countries, the main opposition party would have a free ride to power against a government that's been sharply criticized for policy malaise, weak leadership and a parade of corruption scandals over a nine-year reign. That is not the case in India, where divisions within the main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party have prevented it from taking advantage of the perceived weaknesses of the ruling Congress Party. Those divisions were on display Monday when party stalwart Lal Krishna Advani, 85, quit all party posts in a huff.
WORLD
December 19, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Leaked U.S. diplomatic cables have sparked a political battle in India, putting the ruling party on the defensive with their disclosures on alleged human rights violations and religious extremism. Most damaging to the Congress Party was a cable reporting that Rahul Gandhi, scion of India's first political family and pegged by many as the nation's next prime minister, told the U.S. ambassador last year that hard-line Hindu groups in India could be a bigger threat to the country than Pakistan-based Islamic militants.
WORLD
June 22, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Most people in this farming region haul their water home in buckets. It's often so dirty it makes them sick. Their roads are rutted like washboards. Half the time, they have no electricity. For more than 25 years, this deprived district has been the Gandhi family's political finishing school, where the heirs of India's most privileged dynasty are groomed for power. Amethi's voters recently sent Rahul Gandhi, 34, to Parliament for the first time. His late uncle Sanjay once held the seat.
WORLD
May 14, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Sonia Gandhi, the woman who Thursday staged one of India's memorable electoral comebacks, is a reluctant politician with a distaste for the rough and tumble of politics. Gandhi is said to have threatened to divorce her husband, Rajiv, after he decided to enter politics to succeed his assassinated mother and former prime minister, Indira Gandhi. After Rajiv's assassination in 1991, Sonia Gandhi became a virtual recluse. She avoided Indian politics and tried to shield her two children from it.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Indian nation watched with the silence of emptiness at sunset Friday while the old Brahmin high priest led Rahul Gandhi around his father's body seven times near the banks of the Yamuna River, where Rajiv Gandhi's remains lay, head to the south, under a pyramid of sandalwood sticks. The priest held an urn of flammable clarified butter while the 20-year-old Rahul dipped one stick seven times.
WORLD
June 29, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Rising high above the shanties of Rahul Gandhi Camp, a water tower painted white with red stripes stands as a concrete monument to comforts that the slum dwellers can't have. Water in the tower is reserved for Indian Airlines staff and their families, who overlook the shanties from an apartment complex on the other side of a tall wall topped with tangled coils of barbed wire. Squatters in Rahul Gandhi Camp siphon their water daily from a tanker truck in a frantic roadside ritual of survival.
WORLD
April 8, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Pakistan's president arrived in India on Sunday, the first official visit one leader of the wary neighbors has paid to the other nation in seven years. No breakthroughs were announced, but both sides hailed the meeting as a sign of easing tensions along one of the world's most dangerous borders. Spinmeisters on both sides worked overtime to lower public expectations of the "private" trip that saw Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh discuss the 2008 terrorist attack on the Indian city of Mumbai, modest if expanding trade links, the disputed territory of Kashmir and efforts to bring various militants to justice.
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