Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaid Gauloises Contest
IN THE NEWS

Raid Gauloises Contest

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the 11th day of its attempt to complete the Raid Gauloises endurance race, the team that includes Times news editor Jon D. Markman finally reaches the last stage: the ride-and-run. Team members seem destined not to make a gallant dash on brilliant steeds to the finish line, instead becoming the reluctantly cruel Khans of three doddering beasts. At 4:20 a.m. on Dec.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Burnett rarely faces a challenge he does not attempt to meet head-on. The 33-year-old Topanga resident organized the first American team in 1992 to compete in the Raid Gauloises, a 300-mile adventure race that has been held annually in different exotic locales since 1989. Burnett and four teammates, including one woman, traveled to the Sultanate of Oman, where they rode horses, climbed sheer mountain faces and paddled sea kayaks through a storm before team unity dissolved.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crazy, nocturnal Chronopost appear determined to keep the team that includes Times news editor Jon D. Markman from finishing last in the Raid Gauloises endurance race. But his team nearly reaches the breaking point after an attempt to hike 50 miles in one day across deep, dry sand. Dawn in a jungle lagoon smothers your face like an old dishrag. It stinks, and you fight to breathe. Gagging and already sweating at 4:15 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking tan and relaxed, Susan Hemond can laugh about the experience now. But there were times in the desolate wilderness of Oman, she said, when the gain was outweighed by the pain. "It was the Outward Bound trip from hell," Hemond, 33, said of the 10 days she and several male companions spent last fall trekking 600 miles across the burning sands, broiling seas and freezing mountains of the tiny sultanate near Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerard Fusil, broadcaster and race master, is built for speed. Not tall but graced with a bullwhip physique and a powerful imagination, he has propelled himself from France to the South Seas at the velocity of sound waves--first creating a new view of sports for his radio audience in Europe, then creating new sports. He is not content, like most electronic sports journalists, to sit in a control room, watching the action on the field.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER: The team that includes Times news editor Jon D. Markman has inched up from last place in the Raid Gauloises endurance race. Today's challenge: a run and 65 miles by raft
At dusk, the road through San Gerardo at the base of Chirripo Grande looked like roll call at the end of the world. A filthy stream of shivering, bloodied Raid Gauloises teams limped, strode, or ran past the applause of villagers in a steady rain. Their smiles, if you could see any faces beneath the poncho hoods, revealed relief to be off that hellacious mountain rather than happiness at being anywhere else.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gentle rain began to fall soon after midnight, streaking the mud on my glasses and softening the sound of my horse's hoofs on the jungle floor. In the humid dark, the contralto voices of a million frogs thrummed, and the crazy blue flashes of a world of fireflies painted a brilliant canvas of motion and light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Burnett rarely faces a challenge he does not attempt to meet head-on. The 33-year-old Topanga resident organized the first American team in 1992 to compete in the Raid Gauloises, a 300-mile adventure race that has been held annually in different exotic locales since 1989. Burnett and four teammates, including one woman, traveled to the Sultanate of Oman, where they rode horses, climbed sheer mountain faces and paddled sea kayaks through a storm before team unity dissolved.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raid Gauloises competitors range from soldiers to triathletes to race car drivers. The assumption is that they are moderately insane, have a death wish or do not really know what they are getting themselves into. I probably fall into the latter category. I first heard about the Raid from a friend, Eric Charamel, who is a French mountain guide. He has led me on climbs in southern France and Corsica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking tan and relaxed, Susan Hemond can laugh about the experience now. But there were times in the desolate wilderness of Oman, she said, when the gain was outweighed by the pain. "It was the Outward Bound trip from hell," Hemond, 33, said of the 10 days she and several male companions spent last fall trekking 600 miles across the burning sands, broiling seas and freezing mountains of the tiny sultanate near Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the 11th day of its attempt to complete the Raid Gauloises endurance race, the team that includes Times news editor Jon D. Markman finally reaches the last stage: the ride-and-run. Team members seem destined not to make a gallant dash on brilliant steeds to the finish line, instead becoming the reluctantly cruel Khans of three doddering beasts. At 4:20 a.m. on Dec.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crazy, nocturnal Chronopost appear determined to keep the team that includes Times news editor Jon D. Markman from finishing last in the Raid Gauloises endurance race. But his team nearly reaches the breaking point after an attempt to hike 50 miles in one day across deep, dry sand. Dawn in a jungle lagoon smothers your face like an old dishrag. It stinks, and you fight to breathe. Gagging and already sweating at 4:15 a.m.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER: The team that includes Times news editor Jon D. Markman has inched up from last place in the Raid Gauloises endurance race. Today's challenge: a run and 65 miles by raft
At dusk, the road through San Gerardo at the base of Chirripo Grande looked like roll call at the end of the world. A filthy stream of shivering, bloodied Raid Gauloises teams limped, strode, or ran past the applause of villagers in a steady rain. Their smiles, if you could see any faces beneath the poncho hoods, revealed relief to be off that hellacious mountain rather than happiness at being anywhere else.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gentle rain began to fall soon after midnight, streaking the mud on my glasses and softening the sound of my horse's hoofs on the jungle floor. In the humid dark, the contralto voices of a million frogs thrummed, and the crazy blue flashes of a world of fireflies painted a brilliant canvas of motion and light.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerard Fusil, broadcaster and race master, is built for speed. Not tall but graced with a bullwhip physique and a powerful imagination, he has propelled himself from France to the South Seas at the velocity of sound waves--first creating a new view of sports for his radio audience in Europe, then creating new sports. He is not content, like most electronic sports journalists, to sit in a control room, watching the action on the field.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raid Gauloises competitors range from soldiers to triathletes to race car drivers. The assumption is that they are moderately insane, have a death wish or do not really know what they are getting themselves into. I probably fall into the latter category. I first heard about the Raid from a friend, Eric Charamel, who is a French mountain guide. He has led me on climbs in southern France and Corsica.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|