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Raiford Rogers

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For choreographer Raiford Rogers, the '50s were a time of superficiality and hypocrisy. But his new "So Nice" looks less like a biting satire of the period than an affectionate, even nostalgic, send-up. The work received its premiere on a four-part program by the Los Angeles Chamber Ballet at the Japan America Theatre on Thursday. Rogers is company co-artistic director, with Victoria Koenig.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
Taking a cue from musicians, filmmakers and other independent artists, Los Angeles choreographer Raiford Rogers has launched a $7,500 fundraising campaign on the crowd-sourcing website Kickstarter for his latest ballet, “Schubert's Silence.” “As you know, arts funding is getting more and more difficult to find,” Rogers said in a phone interview. “You have to be creative and try different things. We wanted to demonstrate to our board members and our potential sponsors that we're determined.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER
It could be a bowling alley or skating rink in 1957, with the bossa nova melodies, the harmonies of the Fleetwoods and the organ stylings of Walter Wanderly. Instead, it's the rehearsal room at Stanley Holden's dance academy in West Los Angeles as the Los Angeles Chamber Ballet once again goes back to the future for inspiration. The work being rehearsed is "So Nice," billed as bossa nova meets Betty Crocker, Brylcreem and bowling balls.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For 31 years, Raiford Rogers has given Los Angeles distinctive chamber ballets, immediately recognizable for their linear designs, meditative minimalism and musical acumen. Seeing how we like round numbers for anniversary parties, a celebration would have been warranted at last year's Raiford Rogers Modern Ballet concert. But that one fell on Carmaggedon weekend, turning attendance into a bit of a car wreck (to go with the metaphor). So what the heck, let's commemorate now. The company's annual gig took place Saturday at Luckman Fine Arts Complex, and Rogers and his 11 dancers premiered two pieces and reprised two others.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
"Bella Lewitzky once told me that if you want to get more work in Los Angeles, you have to get recognition elsewhere," says Raiford Rogers, choreographer and artistic director of Raiford Rogers L.A. Chamber Ballet. He's standing in a rehearsal room at the Dancers Studio on Pico Boulevard, where his 11 dancers have been working to a tape of hard-driving cello music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
For a choreographer, Terry Riley's seminal 1964 minimalist score, "In C," is a gift. Its nonstop background pulse establishes a steady rhythmic floor for dancing. The ebb and flow of the 53 short figures in the score -- which must be played consecutively but with options left to the musicians -- lets the choreographer assemble any number of movement motifs against constantly shifting textures.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1991 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER, Elizabeth Zimmer is a free-lance writer
Raiford Rogers and Victoria Koenig have dream jobs. They spend their days working with people they like and listening to their favorite music--in Rogers' case, these days, the "dream ballads" of Roy Orbison. The two artists are succeeding at something generally thought impossible: building a ballet company in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
Taking a cue from musicians, filmmakers and other independent artists, Los Angeles choreographer Raiford Rogers has launched a $7,500 fundraising campaign on the crowd-sourcing website Kickstarter for his latest ballet, “Schubert's Silence.” “As you know, arts funding is getting more and more difficult to find,” Rogers said in a phone interview. “You have to be creative and try different things. We wanted to demonstrate to our board members and our potential sponsors that we're determined.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Imagine traversing the streets of Los Angeles, absorbing the city's succulents, stucco dwellings, synagogues, psychics, spas and endless expanse of signage from a slow-moving vehicle. There are no other cars on the road, no people in sight, except for a vast array of painted faces on murals. This was the video backdrop to Raiford Rogers' latest work, "Transcription," beautifully performed by his 10-member troupe, Raiford Rogers Modern Ballet, on Saturday at Cal State L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
There was certainly lots to look at Saturday night when the 12 hard-working dancers of Raiford Rogers Modern Ballet exuberantly filled the stage of the Luckman Theatre at Cal State L.A. But sometimes more minimalism is less, however beautifully executed. Indeed, the three-part program, which began with Rogers' signature work, 1985's "Wishes and Turns" (revised last year), set a high standard, both choreographically and technically. With its perfect blend of music (Martinu's Piano Quartet No.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Imagine traversing the streets of Los Angeles, absorbing the city's succulents, stucco dwellings, synagogues, psychics, spas and endless expanse of signage from a slow-moving vehicle. There are no other cars on the road, no people in sight, except for a vast array of painted faces on murals. This was the video backdrop to Raiford Rogers' latest work, "Transcription," beautifully performed by his 10-member troupe, Raiford Rogers Modern Ballet, on Saturday at Cal State L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
There was certainly lots to look at Saturday night when the 12 hard-working dancers of Raiford Rogers Modern Ballet exuberantly filled the stage of the Luckman Theatre at Cal State L.A. But sometimes more minimalism is less, however beautifully executed. Indeed, the three-part program, which began with Rogers' signature work, 1985's "Wishes and Turns" (revised last year), set a high standard, both choreographically and technically. With its perfect blend of music (Martinu's Piano Quartet No.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
For a choreographer, Terry Riley's seminal 1964 minimalist score, "In C," is a gift. Its nonstop background pulse establishes a steady rhythmic floor for dancing. The ebb and flow of the 53 short figures in the score -- which must be played consecutively but with options left to the musicians -- lets the choreographer assemble any number of movement motifs against constantly shifting textures.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
"Bella Lewitzky once told me that if you want to get more work in Los Angeles, you have to get recognition elsewhere," says Raiford Rogers, choreographer and artistic director of Raiford Rogers L.A. Chamber Ballet. He's standing in a rehearsal room at the Dancers Studio on Pico Boulevard, where his 11 dancers have been working to a tape of hard-driving cello music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1991 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER, Elizabeth Zimmer is a free-lance writer
Raiford Rogers and Victoria Koenig have dream jobs. They spend their days working with people they like and listening to their favorite music--in Rogers' case, these days, the "dream ballads" of Roy Orbison. The two artists are succeeding at something generally thought impossible: building a ballet company in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For choreographer Raiford Rogers, the '50s were a time of superficiality and hypocrisy. But his new "So Nice" looks less like a biting satire of the period than an affectionate, even nostalgic, send-up. The work received its premiere on a four-part program by the Los Angeles Chamber Ballet at the Japan America Theatre on Thursday. Rogers is company co-artistic director, with Victoria Koenig.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For 31 years, Raiford Rogers has given Los Angeles distinctive chamber ballets, immediately recognizable for their linear designs, meditative minimalism and musical acumen. Seeing how we like round numbers for anniversary parties, a celebration would have been warranted at last year's Raiford Rogers Modern Ballet concert. But that one fell on Carmaggedon weekend, turning attendance into a bit of a car wreck (to go with the metaphor). So what the heck, let's commemorate now. The company's annual gig took place Saturday at Luckman Fine Arts Complex, and Rogers and his 11 dancers premiered two pieces and reprised two others.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES
The Orange County Philharmonic Society will present the Los Angeles Chamber Ballet's full-length production of "The Little Prince" for two performances next April 27 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa as part of the annual nationwide Imagination Celebration. The Imagination Celebration is an arts program for children founded by the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER
It could be a bowling alley or skating rink in 1957, with the bossa nova melodies, the harmonies of the Fleetwoods and the organ stylings of Walter Wanderly. Instead, it's the rehearsal room at Stanley Holden's dance academy in West Los Angeles as the Los Angeles Chamber Ballet once again goes back to the future for inspiration. The work being rehearsed is "So Nice," billed as bossa nova meets Betty Crocker, Brylcreem and bowling balls.
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