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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
Los Angeles County transportation officials on Thursday sent a strong signal that a direct light-rail link to Los Angeles International Airport may be too risky and costly to pursue, a blow to a regional planning goal long-sought by many transit users and political and civic leaders.  Members of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority board cited the high price tag and construction obstacles to building a tunnel and one or...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
A major downtown project aimed at closing one of the most frustrating gaps in Los Angeles' rapidly expanding rail network moved a step closer to reality Thursday when federal officials signed an agreement to provide $670 million in funding. At a Little Tokyo ceremony, county transportation officials accepted the pledge of money for a 1.9-mile, $1.4-billion underground link between unconnected light-rail lines that skirt opposite ends of downtown, one near Union Station and the other near Staples Center.
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NEWS
April 9, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers began laying tracks for a railroad that will complete Australia's north-south rail link and provide a new trade route to Asia. The $685-million, 880-mile line that will cross the desert Outback will link Darwin--Australia's closest seaport to Asia--with the central city of Alice Springs, where it will connect with an existing railway to the southern coastal city of Adelaide. The line has been planned for a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
Los Angeles County transportation officials on Thursday sent a strong signal that a direct light-rail link to Los Angeles International Airport may be too risky and costly to pursue, a blow to a regional planning goal long-sought by many transit users and political and civic leaders.  Members of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority board cited the high price tag and construction obstacles to building a tunnel and one or...
BUSINESS
June 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A railway to link Alaska to the rest of North America would create wider benefits even if freight revenue did not cover the projected $10.5-billion construction cost, according to a study. Building a more-than-1,600-mile line between existing tracks in Alaska and Canada would spur mining development and open a new trade route to Asia, according to the report released this week by governments of Alaska and the neighboring Yukon territory in Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Wrapping up a Los Angeles vacation and an hourlong, two-train trek from downtown, Benjamin Levert and his slightly harried wife and daughters just wanted to check in for their flight back to France. Exiting the Metro Green Line at the Aviation/LAX station, they towed their four suitcases down a long escalator. To a parking lot. "Where is the terminal?" Levert asked his wife in French, looking around and raising his voice over the whoosh of overhead traffic on the 105 Freeway.
WORLD
June 1, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Russia's Defense Ministry said Saturday that it had sent unarmed personnel into a breakaway region of neighboring Georgia to restore a railroad. Russia's support for the independence aspirations of the Abkhazia region is a source of growing tension with Georgia, which denounced the latest action as "an aggressive step." The 300 Russian railway troops arrived Friday and Saturday, said Abkhaz Deputy Foreign Minister Daur Kove.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1986 | United Press International
The earliest railroad trains promptly found themselves on a collision course with medical science. Physicians warned that passengers hurtling at triple the speed of a horse-drawn buggy would certainly go mad. Sure enough, 19th-Century society did go bonkers about those antique smoke-belching engines with the industrial revolution in tow. The railroading age highballed ahead for more than 100 years.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | Mike Corder, Associated Press Writer
A piercing white flash shot from a bubbling crucible of molten metal clamped to two lengths of steel rail, lighting up the dusty red earth of northern Australia's Outback. "Beautiful," Ben Castle said as he used a small ax to chip away the ceramic mold around the weld when it cooled a few minutes later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1999
The Times' May 23 editorial, "The Challenge of Rail," explained estimates for the proposed 28-mile urban rail system in Orange County would start at $1.3 billion and go up from there. Would our citizens use it enough to justify that expense? If my friends and neighbors are any indication, the answer is an emphatic no. I cannot help but equate the editorial with suggestions to build an extensive rail system to connect Orange County with an airport a good distance outside of our county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Wrapping up a Los Angeles vacation and an hourlong, two-train trek from downtown, Benjamin Levert and his slightly harried wife and daughters just wanted to check in for their flight back to France. Exiting the Metro Green Line at the Aviation/LAX station, they towed their four suitcases down a long escalator. To a parking lot. "Where is the terminal?" Levert asked his wife in French, looking around and raising his voice over the whoosh of overhead traffic on the 105 Freeway.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
The nation's biggest public works project, a new rail tunnel under the Hudson River, was canceled Wednesday when the governor of New Jersey announced that his state didn't have the money to pay its share of projected construction overruns. Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican who took office in January promising fiscal restraint, said New Jersey couldn't afford the additional costs that could swell the project's nearly $9-billion price tag. He had previously rejected any gasoline tax increase to pay for the project and canceled it, then said he would reconsider after the federal government this month asked to explore ways to save it. On Wednesday, he said there was no turning back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
The last battle line in the effort to build the Expo light-rail system has been drawn at Farmdale Avenue and Exposition Boulevard — a small intersection about 20 yards from Susan Miller Dorsey High School in central Los Angeles. If state regulators sign off on a grade crossing and station there, it will clear the way for completion of the first modern rail link between downtown Los Angeles and the bustling Westside. But the plan to lay track at street level by Dorsey has run into intense opposition from neighborhood associations, students, teachers, Dorsey alumni and community activists who have fought for almost four years to change the project's design.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
The Westside L.A. subway expansion and a plan to build a light-rail link through downtown L.A. took a small step closer to reality this week when the MTA board agreed to submit the projects for federal funding. Officials for years have been planning a subway that would run from Koreatown to Santa Monica, probably along Wilshire Boulevard. The project, with an estimated price tag of $5 billion or more, is considered a top priority of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. The "regional connector" in downtown L.A. would link the Blue and Gold rail lines and offer rail service through the city center.
OPINION
June 9, 2008
Re "Union Pacific blocks bullet train," June 5 What's needed is political leadership in Sacramento to improve existing rail corridors and link them together in an economical and efficient way. Amtrak already connects the San Francisco Bay Area to Bakersfield; for a fraction of the bullet train's projected multibillion-dollar cost, Amtrak and the state could work together to re-connect Bakersfield and L.A. and improve trackage, signaling and stations....
WORLD
June 1, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Russia's Defense Ministry said Saturday that it had sent unarmed personnel into a breakaway region of neighboring Georgia to restore a railroad. Russia's support for the independence aspirations of the Abkhazia region is a source of growing tension with Georgia, which denounced the latest action as "an aggressive step." The 300 Russian railway troops arrived Friday and Saturday, said Abkhaz Deputy Foreign Minister Daur Kove.
NEWS
August 30, 1986 | United Press International
Rebels blew up two rail bridges in the Jaffna district Friday, thwarting government efforts to resume train service to the troubled north for the first time in five months and leaving nearly 250 passengers stranded.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | Associated Press
The only railway line linking Albania with the outside world will be closed by Yugoslavia, the Tanjug news agency reported Tuesday. The line between Titograd in Yugoslavia and Shkoder in Albania was opened in 1986 and was the first to link that isolated Balkan country with European rail networks. Tanjug quoted rail officials as saying the line, used mainly by Albanians for imports and exports of goods, proved unprofitable for Yugoslavia.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A railway to link Alaska to the rest of North America would create wider benefits even if freight revenue did not cover the projected $10.5-billion construction cost, according to a study. Building a more-than-1,600-mile line between existing tracks in Alaska and Canada would spur mining development and open a new trade route to Asia, according to the report released this week by governments of Alaska and the neighboring Yukon territory in Canada.
WORLD
May 17, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Carrying two official delegations and lofty hopes for Korean reconciliation, two trains pulled out of stations today in North and South Korea and crossed the demilitarized zone on a rail link severed by war almost 60 years ago. The two trains -- one running north, the other south, along each coast -- covered a mere 16 miles each and were billed as a test run of tracks newly laid on the route of Korea's colonial-era railroad.
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