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Raila Odinga

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WORLD
March 9, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In a setback for Kenya's efforts to cement its democracy, presidential contender Raila Odinga on Saturday refused to concede defeat in a close election he said was fraught with fraud and irregularities. But he called for calm and vowed to act through the courts. Kenyans of all political persuasions are determined to avoid the violent aftermath of the disputed 2007 election, which saw tribal killings spread across the country. Kenya's independent election commission announced rival Uhuru Kenyatta the winner of the presidential election Saturday, angering Odinga's Luo tribe, whose members feel they have been shut out of presidential power for decades.
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WORLD
March 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Nicholas Soi, Los Angeles Times
NAIROBI, Kenya - The second-place finisher in Kenya's recent presidential election accepted a unanimous Supreme Court ruling Saturday that his rival, Uhuru Kenyatta, was the rightful winner. The court ruled that the March 4 election was free and fair. Raila Odinga, who was narrowly defeated by Kenyatta, said he still believed that the election was marred by irregularities. But he called on Kenyans to unite around Kenyatta as president for the sake of peace. "The court has now spoken.
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WORLD
March 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Nicholas Soi, Los Angeles Times
NAIROBI, Kenya - The second-place finisher in Kenya's recent presidential election accepted a unanimous Supreme Court ruling Saturday that his rival, Uhuru Kenyatta, was the rightful winner. The court ruled that the March 4 election was free and fair. Raila Odinga, who was narrowly defeated by Kenyatta, said he still believed that the election was marred by irregularities. But he called on Kenyans to unite around Kenyatta as president for the sake of peace. "The court has now spoken.
WORLD
March 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The second-place finisher in Kenya's recent presidential election accepted a unanimous Supreme Court ruling Saturday that his chief rival, Uhuru Kenyatta, was the rightful winner. The court ruled the election was free and fair. Raila Odinga, who trailed Kenyatta in the balloting, said he still believed the election was marred with irregularities. But he called on Kenyans to unite around Kenyatta as president for the sake of peace. Police fired tear gas to remove protesters outside the Supreme Court, and there was a heavy security presence in Nairobi's slums late Saturday after reports of violent protests in some areas.  In the western city of Kisumu, an Odinga stronghold, crowds looted shops and burned tires, Reuters news service reported.
WORLD
December 29, 2007 | Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon, Special to The Times
The challenger took a strong lead in early results Friday from Kenya's elections, raising the prospect that President Mwai Kibaki would become the first incumbent here and one of the few anywhere in sub-Saharan Africa to be voted out of office. KTN television said Raila Odinga had 3.7 million votes, compared with 3 million for Kibaki.
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | Christopher Goffard
Its name means "multitude," and it may be the biggest and most dangerous gang in the world, a thuggish army terrorizing Kenya with extortion rackets and gruesome punishments. Much about the organization called Mungiki is cloaked in myth and speculation, not least the estimate of sworn members -- some say 100,000, others say millions. Those claiming to be defectors, however, say the gang relies on strict discipline and tolerates no dissent. "If a member disobeys, they would cut that member's head off and put the head in public view at the place where they had a problem with the member," an alleged former member said in a statement to prosecutors at the International Criminal Court.
OPINION
January 9, 2008
Re "First aid for Kenya," editorial, Jan. 4 This editorial rightly warns of possible spiraling ethnic violence in Kenya, and your call for aggressive international mediation of its presidential election dispute is certainly prudent. Already, hundreds of Kenyans have lost their lives, and hundreds of thousands have been displaced. Those fomenting ethnic strife in Kenya should be put on notice that the world is watching. All sides -- especially President Mwai Kibaki's government, which apparently conducted a fraudulent election -- must be flexible to lessen tensions.
OPINION
February 27, 2008
Hopes were dashed again in Kenya on Tuesday as former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan suspended mediation talks between presidential rivals Mwai Kibaki and Raila Odinga. The power-sharing agreement that appeared within reach last week is proving elusive, and it's not hard to understand why. Kenya's elections, like those in many other developing democracies, can be an effective mechanism for imposing majority rule. But that doesn't necessarily translate into equitable divisions of power, wealth, economic opportunity or natural resources.
WORLD
March 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The second-place finisher in Kenya's recent presidential election accepted a unanimous Supreme Court ruling Saturday that his chief rival, Uhuru Kenyatta, was the rightful winner. The court ruled the election was free and fair. Raila Odinga, who trailed Kenyatta in the balloting, said he still believed the election was marred with irregularities. But he called on Kenyans to unite around Kenyatta as president for the sake of peace. Police fired tear gas to remove protesters outside the Supreme Court, and there was a heavy security presence in Nairobi's slums late Saturday after reports of violent protests in some areas.  In the western city of Kisumu, an Odinga stronghold, crowds looted shops and burned tires, Reuters news service reported.
WORLD
January 11, 2008 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Efforts to resolve Kenya's disputed presidential election faltered Thursday as diplomats from the United States and African Union left the country without forging an agreement. As he departed, African Union Chairman John Kufuor, who is president of Ghana, said both sides had agreed to a new round of talks under the stewardship of former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan. Annan will lead a panel of African experts expected to convene soon in Kenya. But the prospects appeared dim as Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki and his challenger, Raila Odinga, who have refused to meet, blamed each other for the collapse of talks supervised by the African Union.
WORLD
March 9, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In a setback for Kenya's efforts to cement its democracy, presidential contender Raila Odinga on Saturday refused to concede defeat in a close election he said was fraught with fraud and irregularities. But he called for calm and vowed to act through the courts. Kenyans of all political persuasions are determined to avoid the violent aftermath of the disputed 2007 election, which saw tribal killings spread across the country. Kenya's independent election commission announced rival Uhuru Kenyatta the winner of the presidential election Saturday, angering Odinga's Luo tribe, whose members feel they have been shut out of presidential power for decades.
WORLD
March 4, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
Nairobi, KENYA -- Kenyans lined up before dawn Monday to vote in a tight presidential election, with tribal tensions simmering beneath the surface despite vows by politicians and activists to prevent the bloody clashes that marred a disputed 2007 presidential vote. The two front-runners in a field of eight presidential candidates, Raila Odinga and Uhuru Kenyatta, lead political coalitions based around rival tribal groupings, but have vowed to abide by the outcome of the voting. President Mwai Kibaki is stepping down after serving two five-year terms, the constitutional limit.
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | Christopher Goffard
Its name means "multitude," and it may be the biggest and most dangerous gang in the world, a thuggish army terrorizing Kenya with extortion rackets and gruesome punishments. Much about the organization called Mungiki is cloaked in myth and speculation, not least the estimate of sworn members -- some say 100,000, others say millions. Those claiming to be defectors, however, say the gang relies on strict discipline and tolerates no dissent. "If a member disobeys, they would cut that member's head off and put the head in public view at the place where they had a problem with the member," an alleged former member said in a statement to prosecutors at the International Criminal Court.
WORLD
January 6, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
A year ago, opposition leader Raila Odinga hit the streets to protest a flawed presidential election that sparked the deadliest political standoff in Kenya's post-independence history. Demonstrations led to riots and then ethnic clashes that spread across this East African nation, leaving more than 1,000 people dead and 350,000 homeless. It wasn't the first time Odinga had to fight to be heard.
OPINION
February 27, 2008
Hopes were dashed again in Kenya on Tuesday as former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan suspended mediation talks between presidential rivals Mwai Kibaki and Raila Odinga. The power-sharing agreement that appeared within reach last week is proving elusive, and it's not hard to understand why. Kenya's elections, like those in many other developing democracies, can be an effective mechanism for imposing majority rule. But that doesn't necessarily translate into equitable divisions of power, wealth, economic opportunity or natural resources.
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The two rivals at the center of Kenya's bitter election dispute met Thursday and shook hands, offering a potential breakthrough in the violent political standoff that has crippled this East African nation. In their first meeting since the disputed Dec. 27 presidential vote, President Mwai Kibaki and opposition leader Raila Odinga met with former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan for about an hour.
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The two rivals at the center of Kenya's bitter election dispute met Thursday and shook hands, offering a potential breakthrough in the violent political standoff that has crippled this East African nation. In their first meeting since the disputed Dec. 27 presidential vote, President Mwai Kibaki and opposition leader Raila Odinga met with former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan for about an hour.
WORLD
March 4, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
Nairobi, KENYA -- Kenyans lined up before dawn Monday to vote in a tight presidential election, with tribal tensions simmering beneath the surface despite vows by politicians and activists to prevent the bloody clashes that marred a disputed 2007 presidential vote. The two front-runners in a field of eight presidential candidates, Raila Odinga and Uhuru Kenyatta, lead political coalitions based around rival tribal groupings, but have vowed to abide by the outcome of the voting. President Mwai Kibaki is stepping down after serving two five-year terms, the constitutional limit.
WORLD
January 18, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Raila Odinga built a career as a political outsider. As a young man, he watched as his father, a fighter for independence and Kenya's first vice president, was outmaneuvered by political opponents and eventually jailed. Odinga pursued his own path of dissent, spending much of the 1980s in jail or under house arrest for his alleged role in plotting a 1982 coup. Later, as an outspoken government critic, he masterminded a 2002 opposition coalition that put Mwai Kibaki into the presidency.
WORLD
January 12, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
With a thriving economy and two free, fair elections under its belt, Kenya was supposed to be a model for Africa. But much of its progress appears to have unraveled in two weeks of postelection violence in which 500 people have been killed and 250,000 driven from their homes. An economy that grew 6% last year has screeched to a halt, tribal clashes are threatening to boil over, and Kenya's reputation as a democratic stalwart is in tatters.
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