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Railroad Accidents Alabama

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September 23, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Amtrak Sunset Limited from Los Angeles to Miami with 206 people aboard hurtled off an aging trestle early Wednesday and plunged like a steel stone into a foggy Alabama bayou, killing 44 and leaving at least three others trapped in wreckage that sank into an ink-black swamp crawling with snakes and alligators. A locomotive erupted into flames, burning its crew. Fire spread to the wood-and-steel trestle. One of the coach cars hung over the edge of the 84-year-old structure but did not fall.
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NEWS
December 16, 1993 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The testimony of towboat crewmen Wednesday reinforced growing evidence that barges lashed to their vessel rammed a bridge a few minutes before an Amtrak train plunged from the disabled span into a bayou, killing 47 people. Willie C. Odom, the man who was at the helm of the towboat Mauvilla, told a National Transportation Safety Board hearing that he became lost in the fog as he headed up the Mobile River in the early morning darkness of Sept. 22 with six heavily laden barges.
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NEWS
September 24, 1993 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Janice McNab, a longtime school principal in Long Beach, was taking her first post-retirement vacation with her husband, James, who was also retired from the Port of Long Beach. On Sunday, the couple left Los Angeles on an Amtrak train ride across the country for what was to be a leisurely three-week vacation to visit relatives and see their 18-year-old daughter, Heather, play in a college volleyball tournament in Gainesville. But they never made it.
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Survivors testified vividly Monday about moments of terror, chaos and death after an Amtrak train plunged off a battered railroad bridge and into a foggy bayou near here last September, killing 47 of the 210 people aboard. "I heard my friend calling, 'I can't get out! My door won't open!
NEWS
January 5, 1987 | Associated Press
An automobile went through a rail crossing that had no signals and was sliced in two by an Amtrak passenger train, killing all three people in the automobile, authorities said Sunday.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Amtrak's worst railroad crash has prompted a call by Transportation Secretary Federico Pena for stricter bridge inspections, tougher licensing rules for towboat operators and better navigation equipment on the vessels. The steps were among those announced Saturday by Pena in response to the Sept. 22 accident that killed 47 people when Amtrak's Sunset Limited passenger train derailed crossing Bayou Canot bridge near Mobile, Ala.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Investigators retrieved a data recorder that could pinpoint the time of Amtrak's worst disaster, but they had no luck trying to interview the crew of a towboat whose runaway barge struck a railroad bridge. National Transportation Safety Board officials said they hope that the recorder will provide them with crucial information about the Sunset Limited's speed and the track's condition when the train plunged from a trestle and into a bayou on Wednesday, killing 47 passengers and crew members.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The testimony of towboat crewmen Wednesday reinforced growing evidence that barges lashed to their vessel rammed a bridge a few minutes before an Amtrak train plunged from the disabled span into a bayou, killing 47 people. Willie C. Odom, the man who was at the helm of the towboat Mauvilla, told a National Transportation Safety Board hearing that he became lost in the fog as he headed up the Mobile River in the early morning darkness of Sept. 22 with six heavily laden barges.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | from Associated Press
A recovery crew hauled the last cars of the wrecked Sunset Limited from dark bayou waters Sunday, as other workers repaired the bridge from which it plunged. The crash Wednesday killed 47 people. The baggage car and the third locomotive from the California-to-Florida train were pulled from Bayou Canot. The engine contained a recording device similar to the one found on the lead engine Saturday. The device was turned over to the National Transportation Safety Board for analysis.
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Survivors testified vividly Monday about moments of terror, chaos and death after an Amtrak train plunged off a battered railroad bridge and into a foggy bayou near here last September, killing 47 of the 210 people aboard. "I heard my friend calling, 'I can't get out! My door won't open!
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Amtrak's worst railroad crash has prompted a call by Transportation Secretary Federico Pena for stricter bridge inspections, tougher licensing rules for towboat operators and better navigation equipment on the vessels. The steps were among those announced Saturday by Pena in response to the Sept. 22 accident that killed 47 people when Amtrak's Sunset Limited passenger train derailed crossing Bayou Canot bridge near Mobile, Ala.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | from Associated Press
A recovery crew hauled the last cars of the wrecked Sunset Limited from dark bayou waters Sunday, as other workers repaired the bridge from which it plunged. The crash Wednesday killed 47 people. The baggage car and the third locomotive from the California-to-Florida train were pulled from Bayou Canot. The engine contained a recording device similar to the one found on the lead engine Saturday. The device was turned over to the National Transportation Safety Board for analysis.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Investigators retrieved a data recorder that could pinpoint the time of Amtrak's worst disaster, but they had no luck trying to interview the crew of a towboat whose runaway barge struck a railroad bridge. National Transportation Safety Board officials said they hope that the recorder will provide them with crucial information about the Sunset Limited's speed and the track's condition when the train plunged from a trestle and into a bayou on Wednesday, killing 47 passengers and crew members.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Janice McNab, a longtime school principal in Long Beach, was taking her first post-retirement vacation with her husband, James, who was also retired from the Port of Long Beach. On Sunday, the couple left Los Angeles on an Amtrak train ride across the country for what was to be a leisurely three-week vacation to visit relatives and see their 18-year-old daughter, Heather, play in a college volleyball tournament in Gainesville. But they never made it.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Amtrak Sunset Limited from Los Angeles to Miami with 206 people aboard hurtled off an aging trestle early Wednesday and plunged like a steel stone into a foggy Alabama bayou, killing 44 and leaving at least three others trapped in wreckage that sank into an ink-black swamp crawling with snakes and alligators. A locomotive erupted into flames, burning its crew. Fire spread to the wood-and-steel trestle. One of the coach cars hung over the edge of the 84-year-old structure but did not fall.
NEWS
January 5, 1987 | Associated Press
An automobile went through a rail crossing that had no signals and was sliced in two by an Amtrak passenger train, killing all three people in the automobile, authorities said Sunday.
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