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NEWS
October 10, 1995 | Associated Press
The Justice Department has established a telephone hot line for people having information regarding the derailment. The number is 602-650-3235.
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NEWS
January 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Union Pacific train derailed on the outskirts of a southern Arizona town, spilling about 10,000 gallons of sulfuric acid and forcing 96 residents to evacuate overnight. Hazardous material crews used bulldozers and dump trucks Wednesday to clear out dirt soaked with sulfuric acid. Railroad spokesman Mike Furtney said the contaminated dirt would be moved to a nearby mine so the acid could be recaptured and used in the mining of copper.
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NEWS
November 21, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Marks was a prime suspect when he was hooked up to a polygraph machine and interrogated by federal agents in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train near this desert community. During hours of questioning by agents who "stared into my eyes the whole time," Marks was told that someone had implicated him in the sabotage of a trestle that sent the Sunset Limited crashing into a ravine on Oct. 9, killing one person and injuring 78.
NEWS
August 11, 1997 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As work crews removed 16 derailed Amtrak cars from the railroad tracks outside this dusty desert town Sunday, talk turned to the last time reporters swarmed through its streets. That was in 1995, when it was revealed that Timothy McVeigh allegedly recruited help in blowing up the Oklahoma City federal building during a stay in Kingman, a city of 13,000 near the Nevada border. To some, Kingman became synonymous with the burgeoning paramilitary movement.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | United Press International
Officials worked Wednesday to remove propane gas from a railroad wreck that forced the closure of Interstate 40, the major east-west thoroughfare through northern Arizona. Sgt. Allan Schmidt of the Arizona Department of Public Safety said a stretch of I-40 east of Flagstaff would remain closed until sometime today. The highway was closed when 24 cars of a Santa Fe freight train derailed 10 miles east of Flagstaff.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Union Pacific train derailed on the outskirts of a southern Arizona town, spilling about 10,000 gallons of sulfuric acid and forcing 96 residents to evacuate overnight. Hazardous material crews used bulldozers and dump trucks Wednesday to clear out dirt soaked with sulfuric acid. Railroad spokesman Mike Furtney said the contaminated dirt would be moved to a nearby mine so the acid could be recaptured and used in the mining of copper.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | MILES CORWIN and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"It was a mess," rescue worker Matt Phillips said of the scene where Amtrak's Sunset Limited skipped the track Monday and hurtled into a rugged ravine in the Arizona desert. "You couldn't have picked a further out spot in terms of being away from help." The train, headed for Los Angeles with 268 people on board, was about five hours away from its destination when the derailment occurred. Rescuers needed four-wheel-drive vehicles to reach the injured passengers.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man identified as the only passenger critically injured in Saturday's Amtrak train derailment is from the Philippines and had been visiting his family in Anaheim, a brother said Saturday night. Francis Bendicion, 50, was traveling on Amtrak's Southwest Chief with four family members en route to St. Louis and Chicago, said the brother, Joseph Bendicion of Anaheim. He had begun the journey Friday night at the Fullerton train station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | From Associated Press
A Val Verde man who was investigated in the sabotage of an Amtrak train says his own railroad-related business has been destroyed by the unwanted attention, even though no charges have been brought against him. John Ernest Olin's California home was searched Dec. 13 by federal investigators, who took typewriters, railroad-related tools and other belongings. "I'm devastated. I'm losing everything," Olin told The Arizona Republic from his home.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a moral to the massive rescue effort that was mounted in the dead of night when Amtrak's Sunset Limited derailed in a remote spot in the desert, perhaps it comes from police dispatcher Pat Borree: "People shouldn't underestimate small communities." Borree, 40, was working the graveyard shift when she got the call early Monday morning and had to respond to a tragedy of unknown dimension at a spot that even locals find hard to pinpoint.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man identified as the only passenger critically injured in Saturday's Amtrak train derailment is from the Philippines and had been visiting his family in Anaheim, a brother said Saturday night. Francis Bendicion, 50, was traveling on Amtrak's Southwest Chief with four family members en route to St. Louis and Chicago, said the brother, Joseph Bendicion of Anaheim. He had begun the journey Friday night at the Fullerton train station.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Amtrak train, rolling like a silver streak through the early morning darkness, plunged several feet down a sag in a flood-damaged bridge and derailed Saturday eight hours after leaving Los Angeles, injuring 154 of the 325 people on board. No one was killed. Sparks flew as the engineer braked. One passenger hit the ceiling. Another slammed his head into a wall. Another felt like he was falling down a mountain, and still another thought he had been slapped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | From Associated Press
A Val Verde man who was investigated in the sabotage of an Amtrak train says his own railroad-related business has been destroyed by the unwanted attention, even though no charges have been brought against him. John Ernest Olin's California home was searched Dec. 13 by federal investigators, who took typewriters, railroad-related tools and other belongings. "I'm devastated. I'm losing everything," Olin told The Arizona Republic from his home.
NEWS
December 14, 1995 | BOB POOL and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
FBI agents raided a rural home near Magic Mountain theme park and detained a railroad salvage company executive Wednesday morning in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak passenger train in October near the remote Arizona desert community of Hyder.
NEWS
December 14, 1995 | BOB POOL and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
FBI agents raided a rural home near Magic Mountain and detained a railroad salvage company executive Wednesday morning in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak passenger train in October near the remote Arizona desert community of Hyder.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Marks was a prime suspect when he was hooked up to a polygraph machine and interrogated by federal agents in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train near this desert community. During hours of questioning by agents who "stared into my eyes the whole time," Marks was told that someone had implicated him in the sabotage of a trestle that sent the Sunset Limited crashing into a ravine on Oct. 9, killing one person and injuring 78.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | PETER H. KING
Among the boys I ran with in Fresno, train derailment was a popular topic. We could waste whole afternoons debating technique. Some kids claimed they could make a freight train jump the tracks with the proper placement of a single quarter. Others went in for more elaborate schemes, involving crowbars and rocks and the like. It was all talk, of course, boy talk.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Two freight trains collided head-on in a Southern Pacific yard Monday, killing an engineer, who was trapped in the wreckage. Three other railroad workers suffered minor injuries. Southern Pacific spokesman John Tierney said the cause of the collision was under investigation. He said the trains were moving "at a very slow speed" when they collided.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a moral to the massive rescue effort that was mounted in the dead of night when Amtrak's Sunset Limited derailed in a remote spot in the desert, perhaps it comes from police dispatcher Pat Borree: "People shouldn't underestimate small communities." Borree, 40, was working the graveyard shift when she got the call early Monday morning and had to respond to a tragedy of unknown dimension at a spot that even locals find hard to pinpoint.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | PETER H. KING
Among the boys I ran with in Fresno, train derailment was a popular topic. We could waste whole afternoons debating technique. Some kids claimed they could make a freight train jump the tracks with the proper placement of a single quarter. Others went in for more elaborate schemes, involving crowbars and rocks and the like. It was all talk, of course, boy talk.
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