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October 8, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the bouquets of fresh flowers laid at the entrance to Reading's central train station Thursday, a sign beseeched: "Come home Daddy. I love you. Claire." Whether or not Claire's daddy survived what may turn out to be Britain's worst rail crash, Reading woke up to the reality that as many as 50 of its fathers, mothers and other family members who took an express train to London two days earlier might never come home.
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NEWS
October 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high-speed train carrying more than 100 passengers derailed north of London on Tuesday, killing four people and injuring 34. Police launched a criminal investigation but ruled out the possibility of a terrorist bomb. The train had been heading from London's King's Cross station to Leeds, in northern England, when it came off the rails near Hatfield, 18 miles north of London.
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NEWS
October 7, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emergency crews managed to recover two more bodies Wednesday from the charred wreckage of what may prove to be Britain's worst postwar rail accident. Police said that scores of other passengers were still unaccounted for and feared dead. The confirmed death toll from Tuesday's collision of two commuter trains in central London stood at 28, with more than 150 people injured in the rush-hour crash.
NEWS
October 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Thousands of people sang hymns and prayed in a supermarket parking lot in west London on Sunday, remembering 40 people killed nearby when two passenger trains collided. Worshipers at churches across the country said special prayers, while forensic experts sifted through the charred remains of one car of the Great Western express train that collided with another train Tuesday, two miles west of London's Paddington Station. The rush-hour collision was Britain's deadliest in a quarter-century.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high-speed train carrying more than 100 passengers derailed north of London on Tuesday, killing four people and injuring 34. Police launched a criminal investigation but ruled out the possibility of a terrorist bomb. The train had been heading from London's King's Cross station to Leeds, in northern England, when it came off the rails near Hatfield, 18 miles north of London.
NEWS
March 6, 1989
The driver of a British passenger train that crashed into the rear of another train and killed five people disclosed that he went through a red light before the collision, but there is evidence he tried to stop, a British Rail official said. Gordon Pettitt, general manager of British Rail's southern region, said investigators found signs of "severe brake application" by David Morgan before his train rammed the other train outside London.
NEWS
October 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Thousands of people sang hymns and prayed in a supermarket parking lot in west London on Sunday, remembering 40 people killed nearby when two passenger trains collided. Worshipers at churches across the country said special prayers, while forensic experts sifted through the charred remains of one car of the Great Western express train that collided with another train Tuesday, two miles west of London's Paddington Station. The rush-hour collision was Britain's deadliest in a quarter-century.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In the second major rail accident here in less than three months, five people died and about 80 others were injured Saturday afternoon when two trains collided on the southern outskirts of the city. Officials said that only because the latest crash occurred on a weekend, when the trains were not full, the tragedy was not as deadly as the rush-hour collision that killed 35 commuters near London's busiest rail junction last Dec. 12.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 26 people died and about 150 were injured when two crowded commuter trains crashed and burst into flames near London's Paddington Station at the height of rush hour Tuesday morning. The collision was the worst in Britain in a decade and the second fatal crash on the same line in two years. It sent a plume of black smoke into a cloudless fall sky, and dozens of police cars, firetrucks and ambulances racing through traffic to the scene.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A preliminary investigation of the collision of three trains in southwest London, which claimed a 34th victim Friday, blamed the accident on faulty installation of signaling equipment by British Rail workers. British Rail promptly assumed responsibility for the accident Monday at Clapham Junction and pledged to make payments to the victims' relatives and to more than 100 people who were injured.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the bouquets of fresh flowers laid at the entrance to Reading's central train station Thursday, a sign beseeched: "Come home Daddy. I love you. Claire." Whether or not Claire's daddy survived what may turn out to be Britain's worst rail crash, Reading woke up to the reality that as many as 50 of its fathers, mothers and other family members who took an express train to London two days earlier might never come home.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emergency crews managed to recover two more bodies Wednesday from the charred wreckage of what may prove to be Britain's worst postwar rail accident. Police said that scores of other passengers were still unaccounted for and feared dead. The confirmed death toll from Tuesday's collision of two commuter trains in central London stood at 28, with more than 150 people injured in the rush-hour crash.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 26 people died and about 150 were injured when two crowded commuter trains crashed and burst into flames near London's Paddington Station at the height of rush hour Tuesday morning. The collision was the worst in Britain in a decade and the second fatal crash on the same line in two years. It sent a plume of black smoke into a cloudless fall sky, and dozens of police cars, firetrucks and ambulances racing through traffic to the scene.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Six people were killed Friday and as many as 170 injured, 13 seriously, when a packed express train plowed into an empty freight train in the western suburbs of London. The engineer of the passenger train was later arrested and taken in for questioning, British Transport police said. The other engineer was released. The train caught fire, but fire services said they extinguished the blaze quickly. Helicopter ambulances brought in doctors and ferried the worst injured to four nearby hospitals.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
A crowded commuter train slammed into a crash barrier during morning rush hour at a London station Tuesday, killing one person and injuring 248. British Rail suggested brake failure might have caused the accident. The crash revived charges that Britain's Conservative government has skimped on the state-run rail network's safety to save money. The government denied that. Critics said the 10-car train, carrying about 1,000 passengers, was overcrowded.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | From United Press International
Police said Monday that a drunken man is also a lucky man--escaping with barely a scratch after being run over by a high-speed express train in southern England. British Transport Police in Bristol, 119 miles west of London, said that Terrence Frampton-Carter was taking a short cut across the tracks Friday night and either fell or lay down.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Six people were killed Friday and as many as 170 injured, 13 seriously, when a packed express train plowed into an empty freight train in the western suburbs of London. The engineer of the passenger train was later arrested and taken in for questioning, British Transport police said. The other engineer was released. The train caught fire, but fire services said they extinguished the blaze quickly. Helicopter ambulances brought in doctors and ferried the worst injured to four nearby hospitals.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
One of Britain's worst postwar rail tragedies might have been prevented if an older train that was involved had been equipped with a two-way radio such as those now used on a majority of the rolling stock of state-owned British Rail Corp., a senior company official said Tuesday.
NEWS
March 6, 1989
The driver of a British passenger train that crashed into the rear of another train and killed five people disclosed that he went through a red light before the collision, but there is evidence he tried to stop, a British Rail official said. Gordon Pettitt, general manager of British Rail's southern region, said investigators found signs of "severe brake application" by David Morgan before his train rammed the other train outside London.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In the second major rail accident here in less than three months, five people died and about 80 others were injured Saturday afternoon when two trains collided on the southern outskirts of the city. Officials said that only because the latest crash occurred on a weekend, when the trains were not full, the tragedy was not as deadly as the rush-hour collision that killed 35 commuters near London's busiest rail junction last Dec. 12.
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