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NEWS
December 24, 1995 | From Associated Press
The threat of a toxic chemical release at a three-train wreck and fire eased Saturday, and most of the evacuees were allowed to return home. The Friday night collision killed at least two workers, and a third was missing and presumed dead, officials said. Another of the six workers involved was slightly injured. About 30 of the 100 homes ordered evacuated remained sealed off as crews waited for a fire propelled by leaking diesel fuel to burn itself out, said State Police Sgt. Mark Doris.
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NEWS
May 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The deaths of 11 people in the collision of an Amtrak train and a steel-laden truck were ruled an accident and not homicide by a coroner's inquest jury--a decision that does not prevent prosecutors from bringing charges. Amtrak's City of New Orleans slammed into the truck March 15 in Bourbonnais, Ill. Investigators have been looking into whether the truck driver tried to go around the crossing gates and beat the train. No one has been charged.
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NEWS
December 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Crews worked Saturday to remove five railroad cars containing hazardous chemicals after a Norfolk Southern freight derailed late Friday en route through Scott Air Force Base, officials said. About 150 base residents were evacuated as a precaution.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
Illinois officials said Thursday they will suspend the commercial driver's license of the trucker involved in last month's deadly Amtrak collision. John R. Stokes, 58, will lose his truck-driving privileges for two months starting in June, said Secretary of State Jesse White. Keeping Stokes from driving a truck, even for 60 days, will "no doubt" make Illinois roads safer, White said.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A morning rush-hour commuter train struck a school bus stopped on a suburban railway crossing Wednesday, killing five high school students and injuring 28 others. The violent impact of the 50-m.p.h. train wrenched the bus off its wheels, turning its crushed upper hulk 180 degrees before it came to rest next to the tracks. Inside, students who had clambered to the front of the bus to escape were tossed about like dolls. "You could see the terror in their eyes," said witness Coreen Bachinsky.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Connecticut, road sensors are being tested that detect when a vehicle is caught on railroad tracks and signal a locomotive more than a mile away. If the engineer fails to apply the brakes, the device would stop the train automatically. In Illinois, giant nets are being dropped in front of drivers when a train approaches.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Investigators of the Amtrak wreck in which 11 people died want to know why fuel spilled and ignited when the engines were specifically designed to prevent that from happening. The City of New Orleans hit a truck Monday night at a crossing in Bourbonnais, about 50 miles south of Chicago. The locomotive was built in response to a 1992 federal government request to improve designs to prevent fires.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Witnesses to a deadly train crash have given possibly conflicting statements about whether a steel-laden truck was on the tracks before warning signals and crossing gates activated, a spokesman for a federal safety panel said Sunday. "We have not been able to completely reconcile the statements that are possibly conflicting," National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Jamie Finch said, referring to three witnesses' accounts.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The head of the federal agency investigating last week's deadly collision between an Amtrak train and a steel-laden semitrailer said Thursday that evidence suggests the truck driver started into the railroad crossing after warning lights began to flash. An attorney for the truck driver, John R. Stokes, has said his client did not cause the March 15 crash 50 miles south of Chicago by attempting to go around crossing gates and beat the oncoming train.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The deaths of 11 people in the collision of an Amtrak train and a steel-laden truck were ruled an accident and not homicide by a coroner's inquest jury--a decision that does not prevent prosecutors from bringing charges. Amtrak's City of New Orleans slammed into the truck March 15 in Bourbonnais, Ill. Investigators have been looking into whether the truck driver tried to go around the crossing gates and beat the train. No one has been charged.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | MIKE Downey
I was driving a lonesome road a few weeks ago, a few miles from where I grew up, when a familiar sound called out in the distance, cooing like a hoot owl, plaintive as a wolf. It was a man-made noise, but as identifiable as a creature's. I couldn't recall the last time that I had heard this sound in California, but there in the Midwest, illuminated by nothing but beams of moonlight and rural highway headlights, I could hear it most every night.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The head of the federal agency investigating last week's deadly collision between an Amtrak train and a steel-laden semitrailer said Thursday that evidence suggests the truck driver started into the railroad crossing after warning lights began to flash. An attorney for the truck driver, John R. Stokes, has said his client did not cause the March 15 crash 50 miles south of Chicago by attempting to go around crossing gates and beat the oncoming train.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Witnesses to a deadly train crash have given possibly conflicting statements about whether a steel-laden truck was on the tracks before warning signals and crossing gates activated, a spokesman for a federal safety panel said Sunday. "We have not been able to completely reconcile the statements that are possibly conflicting," National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Jamie Finch said, referring to three witnesses' accounts.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Investigators of the Amtrak wreck in which 11 people died want to know why fuel spilled and ignited when the engines were specifically designed to prevent that from happening. The City of New Orleans hit a truck Monday night at a crossing in Bourbonnais, about 50 miles south of Chicago. The locomotive was built in response to a 1992 federal government request to improve designs to prevent fires.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal investigators in Bourbonnais, Ill., began wrapping up their work at the site of a deadly train-truck accident, and the question of when the truck driver entered the track crossing remained unanswered. A statement released by National Transportation Safety Board investigator J.S. Dunn said "a number of people" claiming to have witnessed the crash that killed 11 had come forward and that their stories would be checked.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
A motorist who claims to have been directly behind the truck involved in the deadly Amtrak collision said the driver tried to snake through lowered crossing gates and beat the train, a high-level federal source said Thursday.
NEWS
June 9, 1996 | Reuters
A pedestrian was struck and killed Saturday by a commuter train in suburban Arlington Heights, police said. The cause of the accident was unknown. The female pedestrian's identity was not immediately released.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | Associated Press
Union Pacific Railroad has agreed to install equipment to give motorists longer warnings at a crossing where a train clipped the rear of a school bus last month, killing seven teen-agers. The new equipment will give drivers an extra 10-second warning when a train is approaching, the state Transportation Department said Thursday. Signals also will be adjusted to shorten the time it takes for the light to turn green.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Connecticut, road sensors are being tested that detect when a vehicle is caught on railroad tracks and signal a locomotive more than a mile away. If the engineer fails to apply the brakes, the device would stop the train automatically. In Illinois, giant nets are being dropped in front of drivers when a train approaches.
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