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NEWS
January 5, 1987 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
An Amtrak passenger train en route from Washington to Boston with an estimated 500 people aboard derailed outside Baltimore on Sunday after sideswiping three Conrail engines, killing at least 12 people and injuring at least 160 others, authorities said. It was the worst accident in Amtrak history.
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NEWS
July 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A fire raging for a second day Thursday in a train tunnel under Baltimore cast smoke over downtown offices, shut down the Orioles' ballpark and burned fiber-optic cables, slowing Internet traffic across the country. The accident, by blocking CSX Transportation's only direct route between the industrial Northeast and the South, also derailed freight and passenger transportation.
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NEWS
July 16, 1988 | United Press International
A former Conrail engineer who smoked marijuana shortly before a train accident that killed 16 people was sentenced Friday to three years in prison for lying to federal investigators after the wreck. U.S. District Judge Norman Ramsey ordered the three-year term to be served consecutive to the five years that Ricky Gates already is serving on state manslaughter charges. Gates, 33, told the National Transportation Safety Board after the Jan.
SPORTS
July 19, 2001 | Time Wire Services
The Baltimore Orioles were forced to postpone the second game of a day-night doubleheader against the Texas Rangers on Wednesday because of a train derailment near Camden Yards. The game was postponed as heavy, black smoke billowed above Camden Yards 90 minutes before the scheduled start. The game will be made up as part of a day-night doubleheader today.
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
The Conrail engines hit by a passenger train in a collision that killed 15 people and injured 176 ran a stop signal moments before the crash, federal investigators said Monday. The engineer operating the Conrail engines told the railroad in a written statement that he saw the stop signal about 500 feet from the site of Sunday afternoon's crash, but was unable to stop in time, said Joseph T. Nall, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | Reuters
A train carrying caustic hydrochloric acid derailed Thursday morning, disrupting rail and auto traffic along an interstate highway during rush hour.
NEWS
June 10, 1988
The Senate gave final congressional approval to a bill that would for the first time prohibit train crews from disabling safety devices and require railroad engineers to obtain licenses. The legislation, which was approved on a voice vote, now goes to the White House for President Reagan's signature. Administration officials have expressed support for the measure. The bill is a response to the Jan. 4, 1987, disaster in Chase, Md.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | From the Washington Post
The engineer of the Conrail train that rolled into the path of a high-speed Amtrak train, killing 15 persons, ran at a steady 60 m.p.h. through two signals telling him to slow down, sources close to the investigation said Wednesday. The engineer threw on his brakes about a half mile before Sunday's fatal impact when he realized he was approaching a stop signal, the sources said.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Both crewmen of the Conrail locomotive that ran a stop signal and slid into the path of a speeding Amtrak passenger train were found to have marijuana in their system at the time of the accident, federal investigators said Wednesday. One source close to the investigation said the amounts of marijuana in blood and urine samples taken from the two men within hours of the Jan. 4 accident near Baltimore were "a sufficient amount" to indicate possible chronic or recent use of the drug.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | Associated Press
A light-rail commuter train arriving at Baltimore-Washington International Airport hit a safety barrier at the end of the line and derailed Sunday, injuring the train's conductor and many of the 22 passengers, a transit official said. The train's operator, who suffered minor injuries, and the passengers were taken to hospitals. One passenger was in serious condition, but details on the others were not available.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A coal train traveling from Grafton, W.Va., to Cumberland, Md., derailed near the Maryland-West Virginia border, and one car plowed into a house, killing a teen-age boy and injuring four members of his family. Hundreds of rescue workers with dogs searched through spilled coal, rubble and snow before finding the body of Eddie Lee Rogers, 15, in the remnants of the living room about 12 hours after the morning crash, officials said.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | Reuters
A train carrying caustic hydrochloric acid derailed Thursday morning, disrupting rail and auto traffic along an interstate highway during rush hour.
NEWS
February 19, 1996 | MARIANNE KYRIAKOS and DON PHILLIPS, WASHINGTON POST
The fiery collision that killed 11 people on a Maryland commuter train in Silver Spring, Md., Friday might have been avoided if a key warning signal had not been removed three years ago, federal investigators said Sunday night. The signal that should have warned the Maryland commuter train engineer to slow down as he approached an oncoming Amtrak train was relocated as part of a $13-million overhaul of signals along the Maryland Rail Commuter Service line, officials said.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For seven months they lived, learned and worked together at a federal Job Corps center in historic Harpers Ferry, W. Va., trying to overcome their own troubled histories by mastering such workplace skills as carpentry, bricklaying, house painting and building maintenance. Most of the 120 or so disadvantaged youths enrolled in the government-subsidized training program decided to stay in Harpers Ferry over the three-day holiday weekend.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve people died and at least 20 more were injured Friday night when an Amtrak train bound for Chicago and a commuter train nearing Washington collided on a wooded, snowbound stretch of track just beyond the nation's capital. The crash, which occurred as darkness fell and snow from a daylong storm mounted, was the third serious rail accident in the nation in eight days. A commuter accident killed three people in New Jersey on Feb. 9 and a freight train derailed in St. Paul, Minn., Thursday.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | Associated Press
A commuter train rammed the back of a stopped Amtrak train Friday, and 12 people suffered minor injuries, a railroad spokesman said. The Amtrak train, the Virginian, en route from Richmond to Boston, was delayed for about 12 minutes because of the collision with the Maryland Rail Commuter train, the official said.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Conrail agreed to pay $5.5 million in the last of about 370 court claims stemming from a fiery Amtrak-Conrail train wreck that killed 16 people near Baltimore in 1987. Attorneys for Susan Schweitzer, 45, of New York, said the settlement came just before selection of a jury to hear the civil damage trial in Baltimore. The crash occurred Jan. 4, 1987, when three Conrail locomotives ran through a switch and into the path of an Amtrak train. Conrail engineer Ricky L.
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