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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A subway operator was charged with five counts of manslaughter after his train derailed early Wednesday, killing five and causing more than 175 injuries. In addition, motorman Robert Ray, 39, had a blood-alcohol level of 0.21% when he was tested 13 hours after the wreck, Police Commissioner Lee Brown said at a news conference. Brown said Ray told police he drank three beers after the accident. Brown said that would not be enough by itself to reach the 0.21% alcohol level.
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NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A subway train derailed in the New York City borough of Brooklyn late Tuesday, sending jolted passengers skidding along the floors of their cars. At least 60 people were injured. Three of the injuries were serious, but none were considered to be life-threatening, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said. "People got shook up pretty badly," Giuliani told reporters at the scene. "Heads were injured and they bounced back and forth." The first three cars of a southbound "B" train derailed about 10 p.m.
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NEWS
August 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least seven people were killed and another 150 were injured when a subway train derailed, officials said. The first car of a Lexington Avenue train coming from Brooklyn was cut in half when it derailed and struck a vertical column as it approached Manhattan's 14th Street-Union Square station about 12:15 a.m. At least four other cars from the same train also derailed, a police spokesman said. Police said it was believed that most of the dead were in the first car.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | Associated Press
A subway train slammed into the rear of another on a bridge above the East River on Monday, crushing a motorman to death and injuring 54 passengers. Hundreds of rescuers worked for three hours with ladders and mesh baskets to lower the injured and help other passengers to the roadway along the Williamsburg Bridge about 15 feet below. Passengers were thrown around cars, and their belongings littered the crash site. The motorman's cab was telescoped into the last car of the other train.
NEWS
February 18, 1987
An empty commuter train collided with a train full of passengers on an elevated track in the Bronx, injuring at least 30 people, authorities said. Thousands of commuters on the Metro-North rail lines were stranded at Grand Central Terminal in New York City shortly after 7 p.m. as authorities attempted to repair the damage and treat the injured, according to a railroad spokesman, Tito Davila. Limited service from Grand Central was resumed at 9:30 p.m.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Investigators checked mechanical systems, including an aging automatic braking system designed to prevent calamity in cases of human error, in their probe of New York City's worst subway crash in 63 years. National Transportation Safety Board investigators also planned to talk to the conductor of the train that crashed Wednesday in Lower Manhattan, killing five passengers and injuring more than 200.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A subway train derailed in the New York City borough of Brooklyn late Tuesday, sending jolted passengers skidding along the floors of their cars. At least 60 people were injured. Three of the injuries were serious, but none were considered to be life-threatening, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said. "People got shook up pretty badly," Giuliani told reporters at the scene. "Heads were injured and they bounced back and forth." The first three cars of a southbound "B" train derailed about 10 p.m.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
A subway train carrying about 150 passengers rammed into a work train Friday on Manhattan's upper West Side, injuring 36 people and disrupting morning rush hour for thousands of commuters, authorities said.
NEWS
November 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
A former subway motorman who was sentenced Friday to up to 15 years in prison for manslaughter, said he wished he had been killed instead of the five passengers in the crash that occurred while he was drunk. "My heart bleeds deeply for the families involved," Robert Ray said before being sentencing to the maximum of five to 15 years. "I wish it had been me. I'm saddened by the whole thing. It wasn't intentional. It was an accident. I can't explain how it happened, but it happened.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
A judge denied bail Tuesday for a motorman who was indicted by a grand jury on five counts of second-degree murder by depraved indifference in a high-speed subway crash last week. The charge against Robert Ray, 38, carries a sentence of 15 years to life in prison upon conviction, Assistant Dist. Atty. Dan Brownel said. Ray stood silently as the grand jury action was revealed at a bail hearing before acting state Justice Brenda Soloff.
NEWS
November 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
A former subway motorman who was sentenced Friday to up to 15 years in prison for manslaughter, said he wished he had been killed instead of the five passengers in the crash that occurred while he was drunk. "My heart bleeds deeply for the families involved," Robert Ray said before being sentencing to the maximum of five to 15 years. "I wish it had been me. I'm saddened by the whole thing. It wasn't intentional. It was an accident. I can't explain how it happened, but it happened.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
A judge denied bail Tuesday for a motorman who was indicted by a grand jury on five counts of second-degree murder by depraved indifference in a high-speed subway crash last week. The charge against Robert Ray, 38, carries a sentence of 15 years to life in prison upon conviction, Assistant Dist. Atty. Dan Brownel said. Ray stood silently as the grand jury action was revealed at a bail hearing before acting state Justice Brenda Soloff.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A New York City subway line where a train derailed last week and smashed into steel pillars, killing five passengers, will be operating again today, an official said. The Lexington Avenue line where the No. 4 train crashed Wednesday carries hundreds of thousands of people daily. Up to 200 employees have been working 12-hour shifts around the clock at the crash site, just north of the 14th Street-Union Square station.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Investigators checked mechanical systems, including an aging automatic braking system designed to prevent calamity in cases of human error, in their probe of New York City's worst subway crash in 63 years. National Transportation Safety Board investigators also planned to talk to the conductor of the train that crashed Wednesday in Lower Manhattan, killing five passengers and injuring more than 200.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
The operator of a speeding subway train said he had been drinking and was falling asleep at the controls just before the train derailed, killing five people, according to court documents released Thursday. Robert Ray, 38, was arraigned on five counts of second-degree manslaughter and was ordered held without bail. He had a blood-alcohol level of 0.21%, twice the legal limit, according to tests taken about 13 hours after the accident.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A subway operator was charged with five counts of manslaughter after his train derailed early Wednesday, killing five and causing more than 175 injuries. In addition, motorman Robert Ray, 39, had a blood-alcohol level of 0.21% when he was tested 13 hours after the wreck, Police Commissioner Lee Brown said at a news conference. Brown said Ray told police he drank three beers after the accident. Brown said that would not be enough by itself to reach the 0.21% alcohol level.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A New York City subway line where a train derailed last week and smashed into steel pillars, killing five passengers, will be operating again today, an official said. The Lexington Avenue line where the No. 4 train crashed Wednesday carries hundreds of thousands of people daily. Up to 200 employees have been working 12-hour shifts around the clock at the crash site, just north of the 14th Street-Union Square station.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | Associated Press
A subway train slammed into the rear of another on a bridge above the East River on Monday, crushing a motorman to death and injuring 54 passengers. Hundreds of rescuers worked for three hours with ladders and mesh baskets to lower the injured and help other passengers to the roadway along the Williamsburg Bridge about 15 feet below. Passengers were thrown around cars, and their belongings littered the crash site. The motorman's cab was telescoped into the last car of the other train.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least seven people were killed and another 150 were injured when a subway train derailed, officials said. The first car of a Lexington Avenue train coming from Brooklyn was cut in half when it derailed and struck a vertical column as it approached Manhattan's 14th Street-Union Square station about 12:15 a.m. At least four other cars from the same train also derailed, a police spokesman said. Police said it was believed that most of the dead were in the first car.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
A subway train carrying about 150 passengers rammed into a work train Friday on Manhattan's upper West Side, injuring 36 people and disrupting morning rush hour for thousands of commuters, authorities said.
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