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Railroad Accidents Northern California

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NEWS
July 13, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after one of the state's worst ecological disasters, this small town on the Upper Sacramento River is slowly healing itself. The toxic plume of pesticide that flowed down the river from a derailed train car dissipated long ago, but it left behind a bitter residue of lost business and ruined health, of lawsuits and anger, and of fears about the future.
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NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
An Amtrak passenger train hit a tractor-trailer and derailed near here Thursday after the big rig driver allegedly tried to beat the train across the tracks. Fourteen people reported minor injuries and 11 of them were hospitalized for observation, said Amtrak spokeswoman Jennifer McMahon. Six had been released Thursday night. The three who were not hospitalized were crew members, two of whom suffered only cuts and bruises, she said.
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NEWS
July 17, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 10-mile-long toxic chemical plume that spewed from a derailed tanker car into the upper Sacramento River was expected to reach California's biggest reservoir today, after devastating a stretch of the river's ecosystem, experts said. Some predicted it would take 10 years for the river to recover.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Lodi woman and four children were killed Thursday morning when the woman, apparently ignoring a lowered crossing gate and flashing lights, drove into the path of a 4,000-ton Union Pacific freight train near Stockton. The accident occurred when Penney Corona, 27, tried to race the train across the tracks on her way home after dropping off her boyfriend at work, authorities said. The dead children included Corona's two daughters, Natosha, 7, and Kayla, 6. Also killed were Mistie L.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to save endangered bald eagles and other birds from possible starvation, state wildlife officials on Monday built three "trout corrals" on a stretch of the Sacramento River that was stripped of all aquatic life by a deadly chemical spill north of Dunsmuir last week. The corrals, made of chicken wire lashed to steel posts, will be stocked today with artificially reared hatchery trout in an unprecedented effort to offer eagles, ospreys and other birds and animals an easy meal.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Lodi woman and four children were killed Thursday morning when the woman, apparently ignoring a lowered crossing gate and flashing lights, drove into the path of a 4,000-ton Union Pacific freight train near Stockton. The accident occurred when Penney Corona, 27, tried to race the train across the tracks on her way home after dropping off her boyfriend at work, authorities said. The dead children included Corona's two daughters, Natosha, 7, and Kayla, 6. Also killed were Mistie L.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
In California's worst river disaster ever, the fishery in a 40-mile stretch of the upper Sacramento River to Lake Shasta was wiped out after a derailed tanker car spilled thousands of gallons of metam-sodium--a toxic weed-killer--last weekend. Experts predict it will take 10 years for the upper Sacramento River to completely recover from the catastrophe.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a kick in the gut, the scope of the loss finally hit Mike Rode last Tuesday. The sparkling Sacramento River--his longtime laboratory, his workplace, his back yard--was dead, killed by a wily chemical demon that escaped from a wrecked train car. Rode went diving that day--pulled on a wet suit, snorkel and mask and plunged into a deep river pool with some fellow fish experts. After days of anxious speculation, the biologists wanted to see the carnage close-up.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
No traces of illicit drugs were found in the bodies of three victims of the early morning collision of an Amtrak train and a tractor-trailer rig last month, according to a spokesman for the San Joaquin County coroner's office. The coroner's report found that the truck driver, David Haskell, died of "extreme blunt force trauma" and that two train crew members died of burns. More than 50 people suffered minor injuries in the Dec.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by new evidence of health problems from last month's toxic spill on the Sacramento River, state health director Molly Coye said Friday she will investigate reports of two miscarriages and more than 100 cases of lingering rashes and other ailments. "We are beginning to see reports of some symptoms that apparently are persistent longer than we would have expected," said Coye, the state's new health director. "And in combination with reports of miscarriages, we are quite concerned."
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the state's biggest environmental settlement, Southern Pacific and three other companies have agreed to pay a total of $40 million in compensation for the 1991 train derailment near Dunsmuir that poisoned 42 miles of the Upper Sacramento River, state and railroad officials announced Monday. By agreeing to the settlement, none of the companies admitted any wrongdoing in the massive spill of metam sodium, an herbicide that killed virtually all aquatic life downstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | Associated Press
Full service was restored to the San Francisco Municipal Railway train lines Monday morning after a train crash inside a tunnel that injured a driver and several passengers. A train stalled on the westbound tracks inside a tunnel near the Castro Street station and was rear-ended by another train, said Muni spokesman Alan Siegel. The driver of the second train was trapped for a brief time but was rescued by firefighters Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Environmental Protection Agency and other federal departments have sued Southern Pacific Transportation Co. over a 1991 railroad accident that killed nearly all plant and fish life in a section of the upper Sacramento River. The suit, filed Thursday in federal District Court in Sacramento, accuses the railroad of violating the Clean Water Act and seeks reimbursement for damage caused to natural resources. It also asks that the railroad pay the cost of assessing the damage.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Amtrak passenger train bound from Sacramento to Oakland with about 60 people aboard collided with a car at a rail crossing near here Wednesday night, catching fire, derailing and causing several minor injuries, authorities said. California Highway Patrol Officer Dennis Dugger said the train, made up of an engine and four cars, hit a Cadillac that had stalled on the tracks about 100 feet from a nearby road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1992 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doctors at a Northridge hospital worked more than eight hours Friday to reattach the severed right arm of a 2-year-old girl who was struck by a train near San Luis Obispo, but the surgery was unsuccessful, hospital officials said. The girl, Madalain Hernandez of Paso Robles, remained at Northridge Hospital Medical Center on Friday, where she was listed in stable condition.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after one of the state's worst ecological disasters, this small town on the Upper Sacramento River is slowly healing itself. The toxic plume of pesticide that flowed down the river from a derailed train car dissipated long ago, but it left behind a bitter residue of lost business and ruined health, of lawsuits and anger, and of fears about the future.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House investigators castigated federal agencies Wednesday for failing to take steps that might have reduced damage from two train derailments that have caused toxic spills in the Sacramento River and the Ventura area. Rep. Barbara Boxer (D-Greenbrae) called it an outrage that the government does not consider the substance that killed 200,000 fish in the Sacramento River a hazardous chemical, although the Coast Guard classifies it as a dangerous marine pollutant.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
In unusually florid language, a suit filed Wednesday on behalf of anglers accused Southern Pacific Transportation Co. of being responsible for California's first "junk bond toxic spill." The suit, filed in Redding, charged the railroad with negligence in the July 14 derailment that spilled poisonous metam-sodium, alleging that Southern Pacific failed to maintain its train and tracks because it needed to cut expenses to meet heavy interest payments on its corporate debt.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | MICHAEL HARRIS, Harris is a Times suburban editor
The dead trout were long gone when I visited my hometown, Dunsmuir, for the first time since the July 14 chemical spill into the Sacramento River. The river, where I swam as a boy, where I caught my first fish, swirled green and brown over volcanic boulders, looking as clear as ever. The willows on its banks were unharmed. Only a few small rust-colored plants caught my eye--signs of poison or just of the season? The river splashed and whispered.
SPORTS
December 25, 1991 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christmas is a little colder this year. Fishing season on 45 miles of the Upper Sacramento River ended four months early last July 14 when a Southern Pacific tank car derailed at the Cantara Loop bridge, ruptured and spilled 19,000 gallons of herbicide into the stream. "I'll never forget that smell--like rotten eggs and sulfur," says Larry Green, an outdoor writer who lives upstream.
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