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Railroad Accidents Southern California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. secretary of transportation announced Monday that $1.2 million will go to develop a high-speed passenger train that one day could travel from San Diego to Sacramento--an ambitious project expected to cost at least $7 billion. The money will be used next year to improve the safety of 85 railroad crossings--eliminating some, fencing off others--from San Diego to Los Angeles, officials said. Last week in San Diego, three people were killed in crossing accidents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Metrolink rail foreman Louis Pescevic is something of a rarity. In his 18 years on the job, Pescevic has never had the misfortune of killing anyone who darted in front of his train. Most of the engineers he supervises have not been so lucky. "I have men who have seen 30 people die," Pescevic said Thursday. "It's very traumatic." By the time train engineers spot people or automobiles on the tracks, it's often too late to avert an accident.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
The region's top rail policy-making body was forced to postpone action Wednesday on a plan to eliminate street-level train crossings between Los Angeles and San Diego for lack of a quorum. It was the Orange County delegation that failed to show--at a meeting held at the Santa Ana train station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. secretary of transportation announced Monday that $1.2 million will go to develop a high-speed passenger train that one day could travel from San Diego to Sacramento--an ambitious project expected to cost at least $7 billion. The money will be used next year to improve the safety of 85 railroad crossings--eliminating some, fencing off others--from San Diego to Los Angeles, officials said. Last week in San Diego, three people were killed in crossing accidents.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of decline in the number of railroad casualties, safety experts fear that a recent upturn in deaths and injuries may continue as trains begin to roll across an extensive commuter rail network planned for Southern California. Transit officials plan aggressive public education campaigns before their latticework of commuter rail lines connects Los Angeles with five outlying counties within the next four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to reduce the number of accidents along the main rail corridor in Orange, Los Angeles and San Diego counties, railroad companies and transportation officials have launched a safety program warning of the dangers posed by high-speed passenger and freight trains. The effort, which was unveiled during a news conference Tuesday in Santa Ana, was prompted by a recent series of railroad accidents in San Diego County, Caltrans spokesman James L. Larsen said.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vandalism and an unrelated power outage combined on Friday to slow Amtrak trains along the heavily traveled route between Los Angles and San Diego, delaying thousands of passengers well into the evening, authorities said. About 2,000 passengers who normally take the San Diegan trains were delayed from an hour to 3 1/2 hours at all 10 stations from Los Angeles' Union Station through Orange County to San Diego. Eight trains were delayed, and four were canceled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Metrolink rail foreman Louis Pescevic is something of a rarity. In his 18 years on the job, Pescevic has never had the misfortune of killing anyone who darted in front of his train. Most of the engineers he supervises have not been so lucky. "I have men who have seen 30 people die," Pescevic said Thursday. "It's very traumatic." By the time train engineers spot people or automobiles on the tracks, it's often too late to avert an accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
In the wake of recent train-related deaths, the agency overseeing passenger service between Los Angeles and San Diego will seek federal funds to elevate or lower the tracks at all 92 street-level rail crossings--an ambitious project expected to take 10 to 20 years. A resolution supporting the $736-million project along the 128-mile rail line is expected to be approved Wednesday at a meeting of the Los Angeles-San Diego Rail Corridor Agency, said Sharon Greene, the agency's executive director.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Four people, including a woman on her way to work and a young man playing "chicken" with friends, were killed by trains in Southern California, two of them in Los Angeles County, police said Saturday. In the first incident, at 7 p.m. Friday, Lorenzo Ruelas, 35, of Oxnard was killed when he was hit by an Amtrak passenger train traveling 70 m.p.h. outside Oxnard, Ventura County Sheriff's Sgt. Carl Schoenberger said. It has not been determined why Ruelas was walking on the tracks.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vandalism and an unrelated power outage combined on Friday to slow Amtrak trains along the heavily traveled route between Los Angles and San Diego, delaying thousands of passengers well into the evening, authorities said. About 2,000 passengers who normally take the San Diegan trains were delayed from an hour to 3 1/2 hours at all 10 stations from Los Angeles' Union Station through Orange County to San Diego. Eight trains were delayed, and four were canceled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vandalism and an unrelated power outage combined on Friday to slow Amtrak trains along the heavily traveled route between Los Angeles and San Diego, stranding thousands of passengers well into the evening, authorities said. About 2,000 passengers who normally take the San Diegans train were delayed one hour to 3 1/2 hours at all 10 stations from Los Angeles' Union Station through Orange County to San Diego. Eight trains were delayed, and four were canceled.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of decline in the number of railroad casualties, safety experts fear that a recent upturn in deaths and injuries may continue as trains begin to roll across an extensive commuter rail network planned for Southern California. Transit officials plan aggressive public education campaigns before their latticework of commuter rail lines connects Los Angeles with five outlying counties within the next four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
The region's top rail policy-making body was forced to postpone action Wednesday on a plan to eliminate street-level train crossings between Los Angeles and San Diego for lack of a quorum. It was the Orange County delegation that failed to show--at a meeting held at the Santa Ana train station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
In the wake of recent train-related deaths, the agency overseeing passenger service between Los Angeles and San Diego will seek federal funds to elevate or lower the tracks at all 92 street-level rail crossings--an ambitious project expected to take 10 to 20 years. A resolution supporting the $736-million project along the 128-mile rail line is expected to be approved Wednesday at a meeting of the Los Angeles-San Diego Rail Corridor Agency, said Sharon Greene, the agency's executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to reduce the number of accidents along the main rail corridor in Orange, Los Angeles and San Diego counties, railroad companies and transportation officials have launched a safety program warning of the dangers posed by high-speed passenger and freight trains. The effort, which was unveiled during a news conference Tuesday in Santa Ana, was prompted by a recent series of railroad accidents in San Diego County, Caltrans spokesman James L. Larsen said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vandalism and an unrelated power outage combined on Friday to slow Amtrak trains along the heavily traveled route between Los Angeles and San Diego, stranding thousands of passengers well into the evening, authorities said. About 2,000 passengers who normally take the San Diegans train were delayed one hour to 3 1/2 hours at all 10 stations from Los Angeles' Union Station through Orange County to San Diego. Eight trains were delayed, and four were canceled.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Four people, including a woman on her way to work and a young man playing "chicken" with friends, were killed by trains in Southern California, two of them in Los Angeles County, police said Saturday. In the first incident, at 7 p.m. Friday, Lorenzo Ruelas, 35, of Oxnard was killed when he was hit by an Amtrak passenger train traveling 70 m.p.h. outside Oxnard, Ventura County Sheriff's Sgt. Carl Schoenberger said. It has not been determined why Ruelas was walking on the tracks.
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