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Railroad Accidents United States

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NEWS
February 22, 1988
A rash of railroad accidents last month should show Congress that serious problems remain in the industry since the worst wreck in Amtrak history 14 months ago, Federal Railroad Administrator John Riley said. Equally troubling, he said, is that the federal government has less power to curtail railroad accidents now than it did when three Conrail locomotives slid through a warning signal and collided with an Amtrak passenger train near Chase, Md., in January, 1987. Sixteen people were killed.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Union Pacific Corp. takes "full responsibility" for a series of accidents that claimed 11 lives on the carrier's 36,000-mile system last year, Jerry Davis, the railroad's president, said Wednesday. Davis told a hearing of the National Transportation Safety Board that the company is committed "to making sure nothing like that ever happens again on our railroad."
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NEWS
May 20, 1988
House-Senate negotiators reached agreement on legislation that would beef up the government's ability to penalize railroad workers involved in accidents. The bill would for the first time give the Federal Railroad Administration the power to fine individual workers--including those in management--found to be to at blame for accidents. Under existing law, the government may penalize only railroad companies.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The failure of a government agency to order the use of available emergency braking systems contributed to the crashes of at least 10 runaway freight trains nationally in the last 27 months--two of them in Southern California's Cajon Pass--top federal and union officials say. The crashes, in which at least five crewmen were killed and more than $30 million in damage resulted, occurred in large part because of braking problems, primarily blockages in air-brake lines.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve people died and at least 20 more were injured Friday night when an Amtrak train bound for Chicago and a commuter train nearing Washington collided on a wooded, snowbound stretch of track just beyond the nation's capital. The crash, which occurred as darkness fell and snow from a daylong storm mounted, was the third serious rail accident in the nation in eight days. A commuter accident killed three people in New Jersey on Feb. 9 and a freight train derailed in St. Paul, Minn., Thursday.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Tuesday's Supreme Court decisions on drug testing will encourage California employers to expand their testing programs, particularly to determine whether drugs played a role in causing an accident, a lawyer who has represented many California companies in drug-testing litigation believes.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Union Pacific Corp. takes "full responsibility" for a series of accidents that claimed 11 lives on the carrier's 36,000-mile system last year, Jerry Davis, the railroad's president, said Wednesday. Davis told a hearing of the National Transportation Safety Board that the company is committed "to making sure nothing like that ever happens again on our railroad."
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The failure of a government agency to order the use of available emergency braking systems contributed to the crashes of at least 10 runaway freight trains nationally in the last 27 months--two of them in Southern California's Cajon Pass--top federal and union officials say. The crashes, in which at least five crewmen were killed and more than $30 million in damage resulted, occurred in large part because of braking problems, primarily blockages in air-brake lines.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators have concluded that Wednesday night's derailment of a Burlington Northern Santa Fe train in St. Paul, Minn., was not the result of sabotage. The FBI on Friday said, "If those findings are borne out, we will soon terminate our involvement in the case." The FBI is still investigating the possibility of sabotage in another Burlington Northern Santa Fe freight train derailment--the fatal crash Feb. 1 in the Cajon Pass north of San Bernardino.
NEWS
October 28, 1987
A railroad traveler is more likely to be killed in an accident than an airline passenger despite public perceptions to the contrary, a nationwide study said. The report by the Illinois Public Action Council concluded that passenger and freight railroads are unsafe, saying that government regulations of the rail industry have been lax under the Reagan Administration.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve people died and at least 20 more were injured Friday night when an Amtrak train bound for Chicago and a commuter train nearing Washington collided on a wooded, snowbound stretch of track just beyond the nation's capital. The crash, which occurred as darkness fell and snow from a daylong storm mounted, was the third serious rail accident in the nation in eight days. A commuter accident killed three people in New Jersey on Feb. 9 and a freight train derailed in St. Paul, Minn., Thursday.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators have concluded that Wednesday night's derailment of a Burlington Northern Santa Fe train in St. Paul, Minn., was not the result of sabotage. The FBI on Friday said, "If those findings are borne out, we will soon terminate our involvement in the case." The FBI is still investigating the possibility of sabotage in another Burlington Northern Santa Fe freight train derailment--the fatal crash Feb. 1 in the Cajon Pass north of San Bernardino.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Tuesday's Supreme Court decisions on drug testing will encourage California employers to expand their testing programs, particularly to determine whether drugs played a role in causing an accident, a lawyer who has represented many California companies in drug-testing litigation believes.
NEWS
September 19, 1988
Financially motivated maintenance cutbacks by the nation's railroads have caused dangerous track conditions and increased derailments, the Pittsburgh Press said in a copyright story. The Pennsylvania newspaper reported the number of multiple-car derailments and large releases of hazardous materials nationwide increased 35% last month, compared to August of last year.
NEWS
May 20, 1988
House-Senate negotiators reached agreement on legislation that would beef up the government's ability to penalize railroad workers involved in accidents. The bill would for the first time give the Federal Railroad Administration the power to fine individual workers--including those in management--found to be to at blame for accidents. Under existing law, the government may penalize only railroad companies.
NEWS
October 28, 1987
A railroad traveler is more likely to be killed in an accident than an airline passenger despite public perceptions to the contrary, a nationwide study said. The report by the Illinois Public Action Council concluded that passenger and freight railroads are unsafe, saying that government regulations of the rail industry have been lax under the Reagan Administration.
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