Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRailroad Engineers
IN THE NEWS

Railroad Engineers

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 27, 2002 | Bloomberg News
The union representing 40,000 engineers at Union Pacific Corp. and other railroads tentatively agreed to merge with the Teamsters, the largest transportation union, to raise bargaining power. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and the Teamsters this week set up committees that in the next six months will work out details such as dues, Teamsters spokesman Rob Black said. Members of the Cleveland-based engineers union still have to vote on the merger, said BLE spokesman John Bentley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Two of the nation's largest railroads are turning to remote-controlled locomotives in their freight terminals throughout Southern California -- part of a national trend that has drawn fire from the engineers union. The technology, which allows a worker to operate a locomotive with no engineer aboard, has been phased in by Burlington Northern Santa Fe over two years. Union Pacific is now training operators at its freight yards in Orange, Los Angeles and Riverside counties.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Francisco "Frank" Navarro, a former foreman and retired brakeman/engineer, died Friday at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura. He was 90. He was born Oct. 4, 1910, in Ocotlan, Jalisco, Mexico, and as a young boy moved with his parents to Dallas, where he went to school. He moved from there to San Juan Capistrano and to Oxnard in 1935, where he lived the rest of his life. Navarro was a foreman at the Oxnard Sugar Beet Factory until it closed in 1959.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2002 | Bloomberg News
The union representing 40,000 engineers at Union Pacific Corp. and other railroads tentatively agreed to merge with the Teamsters, the largest transportation union, to raise bargaining power. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and the Teamsters this week set up committees that in the next six months will work out details such as dues, Teamsters spokesman Rob Black said. Members of the Cleveland-based engineers union still have to vote on the merger, said BLE spokesman John Bentley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Two of the nation's largest railroads are turning to remote-controlled locomotives in their freight terminals throughout Southern California -- part of a national trend that has drawn fire from the engineers union. The technology, which allows a worker to operate a locomotive with no engineer aboard, has been phased in by Burlington Northern Santa Fe over two years. Union Pacific is now training operators at its freight yards in Orange, Los Angeles and Riverside counties.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | Reuters
The House today approved a rail safety bill that would require railroad engineers and train operators to be licensed by the federal government. Engineers and train operators would have to pass minimum training requirements in order to get a federal license.
NEWS
March 10, 1987 | United Press International
Brushing aside constitutional concerns, a Senate panel passed a bill today that would require random drug testing of transportation workers such as airline crews, railroad engineers, and truck and bus drivers. The bill, approved 19 to 1 by the Senate Commerce Committee, now goes to the full Senate, where even some lawmakers who supported the measure in committee said they may fight for changes because they questioned its strength against legal challenges.
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | Associated Press
A student at an institute for railroad engineers in Irkutsk near the Mongolian border has won Siberia's first beauty contest, Soviet news media reported Tuesday. The newspaper Sovietskaya Rossiya said 10,000 young women participated in a contest sponsored by the Young Communist League and labor unions. Lyudmilla Semdyakina was judged the "most charming and attractive," the newspaper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Union Pacific Railroad has delivered two remote-controlled freight trains here despite concerns by railroad engineers, who cited numerous accidents and deaths caused by the technology. The trains, used in switching yards to move railroad cars and link up trains, are moved with a control panel worn around the neck. Engineers aboard a locomotive traditionally control a train's movement.
NEWS
June 10, 1988
The Senate gave final congressional approval to a bill that would for the first time prohibit train crews from disabling safety devices and require railroad engineers to obtain licenses. The legislation, which was approved on a voice vote, now goes to the White House for President Reagan's signature. Administration officials have expressed support for the measure. The bill is a response to the Jan. 4, 1987, disaster in Chase, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Francisco "Frank" Navarro, a former foreman and retired brakeman/engineer, died Friday at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura. He was 90. He was born Oct. 4, 1910, in Ocotlan, Jalisco, Mexico, and as a young boy moved with his parents to Dallas, where he went to school. He moved from there to San Juan Capistrano and to Oxnard in 1935, where he lived the rest of his life. Navarro was a foreman at the Oxnard Sugar Beet Factory until it closed in 1959.
NEWS
May 15, 1986
Reacting to an RTD bus accident in which one driver allegedly was under the influence of cocaine, Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn called on the board of directors of the Southern California Rapid Transit District to make drug testing a condition of employment. Twenty-three persons, including the bus driver, sustained minor injuries.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The government on Thursday proposed random alcohol testing for 7 million transportation workers, including truck drivers, train engineers, pilots and air traffic controllers. It estimated that testing would save 1,200 lives in a decade by deterring drinking. All drivers of commercial vehicles, airline flight crews and mechanics and other transportation workers whose jobs can affect safety would stand a 1-in-5 to 1-in-2 chance of being tested at least once a year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|