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February 21, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
After a spate of high-profile accidents, the railroad industry agreed with government regulators Friday to reduce speeds on trains carrying crude, conduct more frequent track inspections and improve braking by July. The measures come on top of an effort by the Department of Transportation to upgrade tank car safety and an emergency order last year to tighten operating procedures on trains that can haul about 100 tank cars at a time across long stretches. The response comes after a handful of major North American crashes of oil trains that set off fires and explosions, the worst one killing 47 people in the Canadian town of Lac-Megantic, Quebec, Canada, last summer.
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NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
After a spate of high-profile accidents, the railroad industry agreed with government regulators Friday to reduce speeds on trains carrying crude, conduct more frequent track inspections and improve braking by July. The measures come on top of an effort by the Department of Transportation to upgrade tank car safety and an emergency order last year to tighten operating procedures on trains that can haul about 100 tank cars at a time across long stretches. The response comes after a handful of major North American crashes of oil trains that set off fires and explosions, the worst one killing 47 people in the Canadian town of Lac-Megantic, Quebec, Canada, last summer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Re "Music Giants Miss a Beat on the Web," July 17: Just as the railroad industry had to go very nearly bankrupt before its executives realized they were in the transportation business, the music industry will experience near bankruptcy before they realize they are not in the record business. LLOYD PETRE Long Beach
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
After a series of fiery crashes involving trains hauling crude oil, the railroad industry called on the federal government Thursday to significantly strengthen safety standards for new tank cars and require retrofitting of the nation's huge fleet of existing tankers. Tank car safety has taken on greater urgency as the oil industry turns to rail to ship the massive increases in oil production that are occurring in shale fields not served by major pipelines, including North Dakota, Colorado and south Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2000
Once again, The Times has exhibited its naivete when the task at hand involves covering a story or otherwise handling an issue dealing with the railroad industry. Sherry Kiesling Fox and her organization, Railwatch, are simply a lobbying "front" for the trucking industry (Letters, April 23). My only hope is that editors will do their homework before allowing the letters pages to be exploited by biased, self-serving lobbying groups. DAVID ARTHUR Colton
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials prodded the railroad industry Wednesday to install expensive crash-warning devices to avert potential collisions and hazardous waste spills, but rail operators said that costs of the changes might be prohibitive. In a report to Congress, the Federal Railroad Administration said that private rail operators should devote more resources to "positive train control" technology aimed at slowing down speeding locomotives and reducing human error, which causes 80% of crashes.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2004 | James Flanigan
At a time when sky-high energy prices are hampering many sectors, at least one part of the economy appears to be on track. It is, appropriately enough, the railroad industry. Yes, the railroads. The most traditional of freight-hauling businesses is seeing a fresh burst of growth and innovation by carrying containers and even truck trailers on long-distance routes that historically have been the province of the trucking industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Isabel Benham, whose deep knowledge of the railroad industry made her an influential bond analyst at a time when few women held positions of authority on Wall Street, has died. She was 103. She died May 18 in her New York City apartment, according to a death notice in the New York Times. No cause was given. Benham started working on Wall Street during the Great Depression. In 1964, after almost 30 years with R.W. Pressprich & Co., she became the first female partner in the firm's 55-year history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2002 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Burlington Northern Santa Fe knew about the risks of a two-train crash but "consciously refused" to install safety systems that would have prevented last week's deadly accident, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday by the conductor of a Metrolink train hit by a BNSF freight. Patrick Phillips suffered a brain hemorrhage in the head-on crash that killed two passengers and injured hundreds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Isabel Benham, whose deep knowledge of the railroad industry made her an influential bond analyst at a time when few women held positions of authority on Wall Street, has died. She was 103. She died May 18 in her New York City apartment, according to a death notice in the New York Times. No cause was given. Benham started working on Wall Street during the Great Depression. In 1964, after almost 30 years with R.W. Pressprich & Co., she became the first female partner in the firm's 55-year history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
A controversial pact between California air regulators and the nation's two largest railroads will be reviewed today at a meeting of the state Air Resources Board. Local activists are expected to criticize the deal with BNSF and Union Pacific railroads, saying tougher pollution controls are needed. Board officials say their ability to regulate railroads is limited. Today's meeting is scheduled to run from 2 p.m. into the evening at 9530 Telstar Ave., El Monte.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2004 | James Flanigan
At a time when sky-high energy prices are hampering many sectors, at least one part of the economy appears to be on track. It is, appropriately enough, the railroad industry. Yes, the railroads. The most traditional of freight-hauling businesses is seeing a fresh burst of growth and innovation by carrying containers and even truck trailers on long-distance routes that historically have been the province of the trucking industry.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Union Pacific Corp., trying to defuse criticism over its worst shipping delays in six years, told customers that it was adding workers and locomotives, without saying when cargo congestion might end. "All of us are acutely aware that we have failed to meet our customers' needs," Chief Executive Richard Davidson said at a meeting Monday in San Francisco to hear customer complaints. "I've resisted the urge to forecast a specific date as to when everything will be fine."
WORLD
February 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A driver fell asleep at the helm of a bullet train traveling at 170 mph with 800 passengers, West Japan Railway said, but the train apparently was on autopilot and no one was hurt. Officials discovered the sleeping 33-year-old driver when the train pulled into a station en route from Hiroshima to Tokyo and halted with the last three cars not yet at the platform. He told rail officials that he "has no memory" of what happened.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2003 | From Reuters
The Bush administration proposed Monday that Amtrak eliminate long-distance trains, some of which lose hundreds of dollars per passenger, in a more aggressive bid to change the way the railroad does business. Positioning itself more firmly for the debate in Congress on the long-term future of city-to-city passenger rail service, the Transportation Department said in its 2004 budget blueprint that big-ticket reform at Amtrak "can wait no longer."
BUSINESS
June 26, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad industry appears to resemble a train wreck. This week, the railroads and their customers suffered the second nationwide shutdown in 15 months. During the same period, the industry wrote off hundreds of millions of dollars in anticipation of severance payoffs, and management-labor relations sunk to new lows. But, believe it or not, the industry may be speeding ahead toward a promising recovery as part of what many transportation analysts describe as a railroad renaissance.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
When President Bush said the other day that a railroad strike "could severely disrupt the economy" and prolong the recession, it may have come as a surprise to many Americans that railroads were still so important. Yet the fact is, railroads still haul most of the nation's coal, lumber, chemicals, paper and food products, as well as most of the automobiles--which travel most of the way from factory to dealer by rail. Railroads are also responsible for commuter services in many major cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Union Pacific Railroad has delivered two remote-controlled freight trains here despite concerns by railroad engineers, who cited numerous accidents and deaths caused by the technology. The trains, used in switching yards to move railroad cars and link up trains, are moved with a control panel worn around the neck. Engineers aboard a locomotive traditionally control a train's movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2002 | DAN MORAIN and MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Gray Davis on Friday canceled a fund-raiser aimed at generating donations from boosters of high-speed rail, as his Republican challenger pointedly accused him of raising money from beneficiaries of legislation he has signed into law. In an attempt to dramatize the point, GOP nominee Bill Simon Jr.
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