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NEWS
June 27, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's railroads began rumbling back into service again Friday after Congress and President Bush acted overnight to end the two-day-old rail shutdown. Most rail operations were expected to return to normal by this afternoon. A spokesman for the Assn. of American Railroads said crews were clearing away a "backlog" of several thousand idled freight cars. Most passenger service was being restored Friday as well. One factor slowing the return to full service was a U.S.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Railroads, Union Reach Tentative Accord: Freight railroads reached a tentative agreement on a new contract with the last of their 13 major unions, three hours before the end of a cooling-off period ordered by President Clinton. John Fitzpatrick, a spokesman for the Assn. of American Railroads, said negotiators for the Transportation Communications International Union representing 32,000 clerks and inspectors and the industry's National Carriers' Conference Committee reached the accord.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the nation's businesses emerged unscathed from the first day of the nationwide railroad strike Wednesday, but companies warned of serious factory closures, shortages and financial losses if the railways remain closed. "If it goes more than a week, we might begin to experience shortages," said Dick Lovell, a spokesman for the Kellogg Co. in Battle Creek, Mich. However, for now at least, the cereal maker is well stocked with grain at its plants.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Bush is upholding three arbitrators' decisions in the railway labor disputes that triggered a nationwide rail shutdown in June, the White House said Monday. The arbitration grew out of a strike in June by the International Assn. of Machinists against a regional railway that touched off a lockout by major rail lines that effectively halted the nation's rail system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1991 | BOB BAKER and JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of Orange County commuters will be put on notice today that a national railroad strike threatened to begin at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday could disrupt passenger service and force them into the daily crush on Southland freeways.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Railroad Union Agrees to Smaller Crews: Burlington Northern Railroad, operator of the nation's largest rail system, and the United Transportation Union have signed an agreement to reduce train crew sizes. The company said the deal, which covers 5,100 union members, will allow it to be much more competitive in markets where it competes directly with trucks. Unionized crew sizes on the 16,400 miles of its system now covered by the agreement include a conductor and either one or two brakemen.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1988 | From Reuters
CSX Corp., the large shipping, railroad and energy company, on Friday took a $778-million charge against its second-quarter earnings to lay off nearly 25% of its work force, and reported a loss of $160 million, or $1.04 a share, for the quarter. CSX will lay off about 8,200 workers, reducing its rail work force to about 30,000 employees, as part of an ongoing restructuring to streamline its rail operations, the company said. Total sales for the second quarter inched up to $2.12 billion from $2.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
In a case involving Continental Airlines pilots, the Supreme Court on Tuesday made it easier for a union to defend itself against a lawsuit filed by members who claim unfair or inadequate representation. In dismissing a suit by pilots who went on strike against Continental, the justices ruled unanimously that workers who contend that they were shortchanged in a labor settlement can win a suit against their union only by proving that it accepted a "wholly irrational or arbitrary" deal.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Orange County commuters who were forced to switch to buses, vans and cars during the nationwide rail strike climbed back on their trains Friday after Congress ordered rail employees back to work. "I had the car all to myself, it was great," said banker Jim McWalters, 47, of Placentia, after arriving at the Amtrak station Friday evening. "There was no baby screaming, no teen-agers running up and down the train."
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Orange County commuters who were forced to switch to buses, vans and cars during the nationwide rail strike climbed back on their trains Friday after Congress ordered rail employees back to work. "I had the car all to myself, it was great," said banker Jim McWalters, 47, of Placentia, after arriving at the Amtrak station Friday evening. "There was no baby screaming, no teen-agers running up and down the train."
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's railroads began rumbling back into service again Friday after Congress and President Bush acted overnight to end the two-day-old rail shutdown. Most rail operations were expected to return to normal by this afternoon. A spokesman for the Assn. of American Railroads said crews were clearing away a "backlog" of several thousand idled freight cars. Most passenger service was being restored Friday as well. One factor slowing the return to full service was a U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Congress and the White House moved with rare speed Thursday night to end a crippling two-day nationwide rail shutdown that already had begun to threaten the economy by forcing layoffs at coal mines and auto assembly plants. The House and Senate passed emergency legislation barring strikes and lockouts by large margins, setting up a "last, best offer" arbitration system to resolve the three major union-management disputes that had idled virtually all U.S. railroads.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad industry appears to resemble a train wreck. This week, the railroads and their customers suffered the second nationwide shutdown in 15 months. During the same period, the industry wrote off hundreds of millions of dollars in anticipation of severance payoffs, and management-labor relations sunk to new lows. But, believe it or not, the industry may be speeding ahead toward a promising recovery as part of what many transportation analysts describe as a railroad renaissance.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the nation's businesses emerged unscathed from the first day of the nationwide railroad strike Wednesday, but companies warned of serious factory closures, shortages and financial losses if the railways remain closed. "If it goes more than a week, we might begin to experience shortages," said Dick Lovell, a spokesman for the Kellogg Co. in Battle Creek, Mich. However, for now at least, the cereal maker is well stocked with grain at its plants.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the nation's freight railroad system paralyzed and Amtrak's long distance passenger service crippled, Congress moved cautiously Wednesday to deal with the shutdown, despite a demand from President Bush for immediate action to restore train service. The Bush Administration warned that economic losses from the freight line strike and lockout would amount to $1 billion a day, while the Assn.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting idle in rail terminals from California to Nebraska were about 300 loaded trailers that are Art Kinkade's responsibility. On Wednesday, after the nationwide rail strike began, the weight of that responsibility was bearing down on Kinkade, operations manager for the Southgate-based rail shipping agent Quality Intermodal. As an agent, Quality doesn't ship goods itself but takes charge of arranging pickups and safe and timely--sometimes overnight-- deliveries.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Travelers started to feel the pinch of an impending nationwide railroad strike as Amtrak on Monday canceled long-distance train service, shunted passengers to buses and prepared to halt operations altogether. Commuter and freight traffic could stop at 9:01 tonight, the end of a 30-day, congressionally mandated cooling-off period, unless the railroads and unions can settle three contract conflicts.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the nation's freight railroad system paralyzed and Amtrak's long-distance passenger service crippled, Congress moved cautiously Wednesday to deal with the shutdown, despite a demand from President Bush for immediate action to restore train service. The Bush Administration warned that economic losses from the freight line strike and lockout would amount to $1 billion a day, while the Assn.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British tourists Lucy Pembrey and Clare Topliss didn't get much of a welcome to Los Angeles when they stepped off their train Wednesday at Union Station. They got the word that they had reached the end of the line--at least until an East Coast machinists' union strike is settled and Amtrak passenger train service resumes.
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