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Railroad Industry Mexico

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BUSINESS
May 1, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Union Pacific Corp. said it will join a consortium bidding for the 4,052-mile North-Pacific Railway, Mexico's second-busiest line. The U.S. railroad joins construction company Ingenieros Civiles Asociados and copper-mining company Grupo Mexico in bidding for the potentially lucrative line, which is now owned by the state. Bethlehem, Pa.-based Union Pacific said it will take a 10% to 15% stake in the partnership.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 2001 | Reuters
Fed up with accidents between freight trains and motor vehicles, authorities in Mexico's northern state of Nuevo Leon over the weekend suspended some railroad service between Mexico City and Monterrey, the country's No. 2 industrial center. Nuevo Leon Gov. Fernando Canales ordered a halt to the passage of trains on the line operated by rail company Transportacion Ferroviaria Mexicana because of a spate of accidents in recent months.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 2001 | Reuters
Fed up with accidents between freight trains and motor vehicles, authorities in Mexico's northern state of Nuevo Leon over the weekend suspended some railroad service between Mexico City and Monterrey, the country's No. 2 industrial center. Nuevo Leon Gov. Fernando Canales ordered a halt to the passage of trains on the line operated by rail company Transportacion Ferroviaria Mexicana because of a spate of accidents in recent months.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Union Pacific Corp. said it will join a consortium bidding for the 4,052-mile North-Pacific Railway, Mexico's second-busiest line. The U.S. railroad joins construction company Ingenieros Civiles Asociados and copper-mining company Grupo Mexico in bidding for the potentially lucrative line, which is now owned by the state. Bethlehem, Pa.-based Union Pacific said it will take a 10% to 15% stake in the partnership.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day and night, the freight trains rumble nonstop through the Rio Grande town of Laredo, funneling auto parts, grain and plywood into Mexico's industrial heartland and sending Mexican iron ore, glass containers and produce to American factories and consumers. Booming trade between the United States and Mexico has doubled rail traffic in Laredo since 1989, helping to make it the busiest commercial crossing along the 2,000-mile-long border.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad crossing that created this town on the Mexican plains a century ago has always given it aspirations a bit more cosmopolitan than those of neighboring farm communities. The Chinese Bank was the town's first financial institution. Presbyterians built the first church in Torreon--which also has the only mosque in this predominantly Catholic country.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day and night, the freight trains rumble nonstop through the Rio Grande town of Laredo, funneling auto parts, grain and plywood into Mexico's industrial heartland and sending Mexican iron ore, glass containers and produce to American factories and consumers. Booming trade between the United States and Mexico has doubled rail traffic in Laredo since 1989, helping to make it the busiest commercial crossing along the 2,000-mile-long border.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad crossing that created this town on the Mexican plains a century ago has always given it aspirations a bit more cosmopolitan than those of neighboring farm communities. The Chinese Bank was the town's first financial institution. Presbyterians built the first church in Torreon--which also has the only mosque in this predominantly Catholic country.
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