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April 18, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The national freight rail strike that threatened to paralyze the sagging U.S. economy was snuffed out in less than a day when President Bush early this morning signed legislation ordering 235,000 strikers back to work immediately. The bill, passed hurriedly by Congress late Wednesday night, also creates a special three-member presidential panel that will review the protracted labor dispute between the freight railroads and eight unions and impose a final settlement by June.
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NEWS
March 17, 2000 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've been working on the railroad--and not just to pass the time away. For more than 160 years, women have been in railroading--as telegraphers, Harvey Girls, stewardesses and, yes, engineers and conductors, architects, yardmasters, welders, brakemen and firemen. Woodland Hills-based writing partners Sheri Moses, 32, and Danette Lindeman, 35, often drawn to railroad sites while seeking literary inspiration, became intrigued with the historic role of women in railroading.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Interstate Commerce Commission approved Tuesday the sale of the Southern Pacific Railroad to Denver-based Rio Grande Industries, marking a new era for the historic rail line that first linked Los Angeles and San Francisco. The deal, by combining Southern Pacific with the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, will create the nation's fifth-largest rail line, with 15,000 miles of track.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Amtrak said it reached separate agreements with CSX Corp. and Norfolk Southern Corp. that will allow the passenger railroad and the two freight railroads to operate over one another's tracks once the freight railroads complete finish dividing Conrail Inc. The agreements will allow Norfolk Southern and CSX to operate over the Washington-New York segment of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor. The pacts also allow Amtrak to operate on CSX and Norfolk Southern lines outside the Northeast Corridor.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1994 | From Reuters
Business travelers may not realize it, but they are at the heart of the slow but steady move toward high-speed rail service in the United States. Rail industry experts believe almost any 500-mile trip that can be made by rail in three hours or less becomes a viable competitor to flying, given the delays, weather problems, airport commute times and other factors involved in air travel.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With contract negotiations broken down and a nationwide freight rail strike scheduled to begin, Southern California train commuters scrambled Tuesday to make alternative plans for getting to work today and bus operators raced to try to accommodate them. Orange County Transit District officials said they planned to add buses from Huntington Beach and Fullerton to downtown Los Angeles, but the number and schedule of the extra buses were uncertain late Tuesday afternoon.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Amtrak said it reached separate agreements with CSX Corp. and Norfolk Southern Corp. that will allow the passenger railroad and the two freight railroads to operate over one another's tracks once the freight railroads complete finish dividing Conrail Inc. The agreements will allow Norfolk Southern and CSX to operate over the Washington-New York segment of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor. The pacts also allow Amtrak to operate on CSX and Norfolk Southern lines outside the Northeast Corridor.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
It is time for Congress to end the deception that management and labor in the railroad industry have the same freedom that the rest of private industry has to negotiate contracts, including the freedom to strike. And it is also time for the railroad industry to stop pretending that featherbedding is a massive abomination that is killing it. Let's first look at the legal fiction that a major freight rail strike is possible if management and the unions are unable to agree on a contract.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators Friday issued an emergency order requiring troubled Union Pacific Railroad to open a section of track to a Texas competitor in a bid to ease the gridlock that has harmed shippers across the Western United States. The Surface Transportation Board, which just days ago held a marathon hearing on the problems at the nation's largest railroad, said Friday that there is a "transportation emergency in the West."
BUSINESS
September 22, 1996 | CLAUDIA COATES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a far corner of Building 10, past the embryos of Amtrak locomotives, General Electric technicians tear up a battered old red locomotive, and two visiting engineers take notes in Russian. Akhmet Balymov and Danetay Akhmetov of Kazakhstan have a big job. After GE strips the locomotive down to a shell and rebuilds it, the two engineers will take it and repair kits for 30 other locomotives back to their Central Asian nation. There, they will begin reviving a rundown fleet.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1994 | From Reuters
Business travelers may not realize it, but they are at the heart of the slow but steady move toward high-speed rail service in the United States. Rail industry experts believe almost any 500-mile trip that can be made by rail in three hours or less becomes a viable competitor to flying, given the delays, weather problems, airport commute times and other factors involved in air travel.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day and night, the freight trains rumble nonstop through the Rio Grande town of Laredo, funneling auto parts, grain and plywood into Mexico's industrial heartland and sending Mexican iron ore, glass containers and produce to American factories and consumers. Booming trade between the United States and Mexico has doubled rail traffic in Laredo since 1989, helping to make it the busiest commercial crossing along the 2,000-mile-long border.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Bush is upholding three arbitrators' decisions in the railway labor disputes that triggered a nationwide rail shutdown in June, the White House said Monday. The arbitration grew out of a strike in June by the International Assn. of Machinists against a regional railway that touched off a lockout by major rail lines that effectively halted the nation's rail system.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad industry appears to resemble a train wreck. This week, the railroads and their customers suffered the second nationwide shutdown in 15 months. During the same period, the industry wrote off hundreds of millions of dollars in anticipation of severance payoffs, and management-labor relations sunk to new lows. But, believe it or not, the industry may be speeding ahead toward a promising recovery as part of what many transportation analysts describe as a railroad renaissance.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
President Bush, warning of economic disaster for a nation already in the grip of a recession, Monday urged the nation's freight railroads and their 235,000 workers to avert a national strike. But both sides continued to predict that the differences between them are so great that a walkout at midnight today Eastern time is inevitable.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nationwide Rail Strike Threatened: The Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees is threatening to halt railroad freight traffic with a nationwide strike this summer after a presidential emergency board ruled against it in a dispute over wages and work rules. The union representing 60,000 track workers issued the threat after the emergency board rejected its and other Amtrak and Conrail unions' proposals on work rules and wage increases.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
It is time for Congress to end the deception that management and labor in the railroad industry have the same freedom that the rest of private industry has to negotiate contracts, including the freedom to strike. And it is also time for the railroad industry to stop pretending that featherbedding is a massive abomination that is killing it. Let's first look at the legal fiction that a major freight rail strike is possible if management and the unions are unable to agree on a contract.
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