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BUSINESS
September 27, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The surge of passengers who flocked to Amtrak trains in the days after the terrorist attacks has begun to subside, dimming hopes that the intercity rail service could attract lots of new passengers amid the airline crisis. Travel agents and industry officials said that after the initial jump in Amtrak ridership, which included many air travelers stranded by canceled flights, the rail service's business was undercut by the overall downturn in travel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2002 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National transportation leaders Saturday urged government and industry to set aside their competitive and political disputes in order to craft advanced technologies to protect freight supply chains from terrorist attacks. "We've got to keep competition out of security," said Gene Pentimonti, a consultant to the U.S. Department of Transportation, "and we've got to make real progress."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Two of the nation's largest railroads are turning to remote-controlled locomotives in their freight terminals throughout Southern California -- part of a national trend that has drawn fire from the engineers union. The technology, which allows a worker to operate a locomotive with no engineer aboard, has been phased in by Burlington Northern Santa Fe over two years. Union Pacific is now training operators at its freight yards in Orange, Los Angeles and Riverside counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2002 | Kurt Streeter, Times Staff Writer
Amtrak's Coast Starlight moves north out of Los Angeles, whooshing past scores of San Fernando Valley backyards. This being the start of a day-and-a-half train ride to Seattle, Ken Jacobsen and his young son have adopted a survival mind-set: Dig in and take what the train gives you. Watch the world go by. Don't worry about the food, the service, the fact that wafting through their rail car just now is an awful smell that brings to mind dirty diapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2005 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Passengers in last week's Metrolink crash described how the impact threw them from their seats, slammed their heads and faces against walls and tables and tossed bodies around the cars. "People were flying everywhere," said passenger Susan Eisenbarth of Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2002 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Metrolink officials are attempting to work out a deal to transfer their work force of contracted Amtrak train operators to a freight rail company, a move meant to ensure that the commuter railway is unaffected by the potential shutdown of Amtrak later this year. Metrolink last week sent proposals to two short-haul freight rail companies, asking them to bid on hiring the nearly 145 Amtrak workers who run the commuter rail agency's 416-mile, six-county network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2002 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
What goes around comes around when you talk technology in Tehachapi. Not the 21st century kind, depicted by the 5,000 futuristic-looking turbine propellers that line mountaintops east of town and spin in unison in the wind to generate electricity. But the 19th century type: the stretch of rail track north of town that causes locomotives to cross over the cars they are pulling.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
The nation's railroads had their worst year in decades in 2009, a dramatic reminder of the brutality with which the recession damped demand for coal, lumber and other goods that make up the backbone of the economy. Freight trains carried 20% less cargo last year than in 2008, according to a report by the Assn. of American Railroads, and the industry shed nearly 21,000 jobs. The 12-month period was the slowest since the association began keeping records in 1988. Among the most dramatic declines was a 33% drop in lumber and wood products carried by train, a key indicator of demand for new construction.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Westinghouse Air Brake Co. agreed to buy Rockwell International Corp.'s railroad electronics division for $80 million in a deal that would enable it to add new train monitoring and communications devices to its product line. Wilmerding, Pa.-based Westinghouse Air Brake is one of North America's largest makers of locomotive equipment. Costa Mesa-based Rockwell is shedding some businesses, including its semiconductor unit, as it concentrates on industrial automation, avionics and communications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2003 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
Despite residents' concerns about the wail of late-night whistles and the rumble of trains, Santa Ana has decided not to fight the completion of Metrolink's addition of a second set of tracks between downtown Los Angeles and San Juan Capistrano. City officials had threatened to sue to stop the project but instead struck a deal that calls for Metrolink to spend $1.
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