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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1991 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It was a horrible experience--the train from hell." That was how Suzann Lynette Jaure, 24, of Riverside described a recent round-trip on Amtrak from Los Angeles to the Colorado Rockies. She and eight Southern California friends had booked a mid-January ski trip on the train that Amtrak calls the Desert Wind. The idea of taking the train sounded like fun, she said. It wasn't.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Organizers of a weekend fete commemorating the Yosemite Valley Railroad have put out the call for an elusive artifact -- folks who actually rode the train before it shut down in 1945. The event Saturday in El Portal will feature memorabilia from the days of the railroad, which made its first journey across 78 mountainous miles on May 15, 1907, providing a link to the park before the era of highways. Former passengers can contact event organizer Sunshine Goodmorning at (209) 379-2577.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Organizers of a weekend fete commemorating the Yosemite Valley Railroad have put out the call for an elusive artifact -- folks who actually rode the train before it shut down in 1945. The event Saturday in El Portal will feature memorabilia from the days of the railroad, which made its first journey across 78 mountainous miles on May 15, 1907, providing a link to the park before the era of highways. Former passengers can contact event organizer Sunshine Goodmorning at (209) 379-2577.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1991 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It was a horrible experience--the train from hell." That was how Suzann Lynette Jaure, 24, of Riverside described a recent round-trip on Amtrak from Los Angeles to the Colorado Rockies. She and eight Southern California friends had booked a mid-January ski trip on the train that Amtrak calls the Desert Wind. The idea of taking the train sounded like fun, she said. It wasn't.
NEWS
March 4, 1998
John L. Stanley, 60, who taught political theory at UC Riverside. Stanley earned his degrees in political science and government at Kenyon College in Ohio and Cornell University, garnering a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. An expert on Georges Sorel and Karl Marx, Stanley had been working on a book about Marx's theory of nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Disneyland on Monday celebrated the 100th birthday of the little engine that could--a vintage steam locomotive that's graced railroad tracks since 1894. Steam Train No. 3 is one of four engines that make up the Disneyland Railroad. The railroad transports passengers around the park, with stops on Main Street, New Orleans Square, Mickey's Toontown and Tomorrowland. The train was brought to Disneyland in 1957. Before that, it was used to transport sugar cane from the Godchaux Sugar Co.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Amtrak directors will meet next week to decide which companies will build a planned $700-million high-speed rail system in the Northeast, a spokesman said Thursday. The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that groups led by Canada's Bombardier Inc. and Germany's Siemens are the leading contenders for the contract. "We can't speculate" on which companies will be chosen, Amtrak spokesman Greg Dany said. The proposed system has been in the works for years and is eagerly awaited by many.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1987
I read with interest the article by David Smollar in the Jan. 11 edition on one-man operation of Los Angeles-San Diego passenger trains ("Engineers Now Solo on Coastal Amtrak"). The comments of A.C. Henderson concerning this practice are quite valid, and I could not agree with them more. (Until Nov. 5, 1986, when I transferred to Amtrak, I was an engineer for the Santa Fe Railway, where Mr. Henderson was my supervisor.) I find it humorous that Amtrak used as its spokesman Arthur Lloyd, its West Coast corporate communications manager, who claims to have ridden on an engine once, to refute the statements of Mr. Henderson, who spent 35 years in engine service.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
Boston Mayor Thomas Menino leaned back in his first-class seat aboard Amtrak's new high-speed Acela Express train Wednesday, bit into an oatmeal raisin cookie and offered his antidote to America's traffic headaches. "Get people on the train," he said. "Everyone loves riding the train. Now we have to get the federal government to make an investment in that." Menino and about 300 other municipal leaders are in the nation's capital this week for the annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
OPINION
August 31, 2006
TRAIN TRAVEL LOSES A LOT of its romance when the train pulls into the station half a day late. That, sadly, is more the rule than the exception on certain Amtrak lines, particularly the historic Coast Starlight run from Los Angeles to Seattle, now dubbed the "Coast Star-late" because it is routinely between five to 15 hours -- that's right, hours -- behind schedule.
OPINION
November 26, 2006
Re "Why dig L.A. into a hole?" Opinion, Nov. 18 Every few years, policymakers in L.A. are bedazzled by busways. First it was the slow-moving bus arteries of Curitiba, Brazil. Now it's the same from Bogota, Colombia. Is this really their vision for Los Angeles? Do Angelenos stuck in traffic really want busways? Busways are a far cry from the world-class city connected by trains that Mayor Tom Bradley envisioned a generation ago. Metro's innovative Rapid Bus system has done a lot to encourage new riders.
TRAVEL
September 1, 1991 | PETER S. GREENBERG
The airline has lost your bags. That special "ocean view" hotel room you've reserved actually faces a dark courtyard. The tour brochure promises you'll see the Louvre, but you only pass by it while sitting in a bus. When something goes wrong on a business or vacation trip, how do you complain and, more important, how do you make your complaint work? Specifically, how do you make sure that if you're a victim of a broken travel promise, you're fairly compensated?
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