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NEWS
April 18, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The national freight rail strike that threatened to paralyze the sagging U.S. economy was snuffed out in less than a day when President Bush early this morning signed legislation ordering 235,000 strikers back to work immediately. The bill, passed hurriedly by Congress late Wednesday night, also creates a special three-member presidential panel that will review the protracted labor dispute between the freight railroads and eight unions and impose a final settlement by June.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Railroads, Union Reach Tentative Accord: Freight railroads reached a tentative agreement on a new contract with the last of their 13 major unions, three hours before the end of a cooling-off period ordered by President Clinton. John Fitzpatrick, a spokesman for the Assn. of American Railroads, said negotiators for the Transportation Communications International Union representing 32,000 clerks and inspectors and the industry's National Carriers' Conference Committee reached the accord.
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NEWS
May 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush, trying to avoid a "crippling nationwide rail strike," named an emergency board to help settle bargaining disputes between 11 unions and most of the nation's major railroads. The action effectively imposes a 60-day cooling-off period on management and labor. Rising health care costs had been a major holdup in contract negotiations, which had been going on for two years.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The labor dispute that produced Wednesday's nationwide rail strike is a complex tangle of collective bargaining issues, made more acrimonious by the fact that the strikers have worked without a contract--and thus without a pay raise--for three years. Compared to most industrial workers, railroad employees are well paid, making an average wage of about $40,000. At stake, however, is more than money.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The labor dispute that produced Wednesday's nationwide rail strike is a complex tangle of collective bargaining issues, made more acrimonious by the fact that the strikers have worked without a contract--and thus without a pay raise--for three years. Compared to most industrial workers, railroad employees are well paid, making an average wage of about $40,000. At stake, however, is more than money.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Railroads, Union Reach Tentative Accord: Freight railroads reached a tentative agreement on a new contract with the last of their 13 major unions, three hours before the end of a cooling-off period ordered by President Clinton. John Fitzpatrick, a spokesman for the Assn. of American Railroads, said negotiators for the Transportation Communications International Union representing 32,000 clerks and inspectors and the industry's National Carriers' Conference Committee reached the accord.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The national freight rail strike that threatened to paralyze the sagging U.S. economy was snuffed out in less than a day when President Bush early this morning signed legislation ordering 235,000 strikers back to work immediately. The bill, passed hurriedly by Congress late Wednesday night, also creates a special three-member presidential panel that will review the protracted labor dispute between the freight railroads and eight unions and impose a final settlement by June.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush, trying to avoid a "crippling nationwide rail strike," named an emergency board to help settle bargaining disputes between 11 unions and most of the nation's major railroads. The action effectively imposes a 60-day cooling-off period on management and labor. Rising health care costs had been a major holdup in contract negotiations, which had been going on for two years.
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