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NEWS
June 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
A nearly 2-day-old strike at the nation's largest commuter railroad was settled Saturday night, officials announced. Long Island Rail Road trains are expected to be running on time for Monday morning's rush hour, Metropolitan Transportation Authority head Peter Stangl said. "There was no concession on the work rules and we paid the ransom," Stangl said. "I made the decision that I would pay the ransom before it got bad out there."
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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
A nationwide rail strike hobbled trains from the suburban express to the London-bound Eurostar on Thursday, leaving many French commuters stuck in traffic jams. The strike tops a week of traffic woes for the French. Bus and subway workers paralyzed dozens of major cities in strikes Monday through Wednesday. Paris was spared in the first job action but was hit hard Thursday, with suburban trains and long-distance and high-speed trains crippled.
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NEWS
July 10, 1987
Six Southern Pacific railroad employees who discovered a fire that destroyed a railway tunnel near San Luis Obispo have been fired because they violated a railroad rule requiring them to stop and try to put it out, a railroad spokesman said. The May 1 fire closed the Cuesta Grade tunnel for almost two weeks, cutting off California's main coastal rail route. Jerry Pera, a spokesman for Southern Pacific Transportation Co., confirmed the firings.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
The outlook for Amtrak grew bleaker after Republican leaders in the House of Representatives yanked a bill that would free up funds for the government-supported passenger railroad. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bud Shuster (R-Pa.) pulled the bill after a Republican-backed amendment to protect labor reforms in the bill was defeated by pro-labor Democrats.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
I've been working on the railroad All the live long day. I've been working on the railroad To pass the time away. For the past two weeks, there have been about 100 clerical workers at the Southern Pacific who would give anything to be working on the railroad. The clerks, scattered through California, Oregon and Arizona, have been paid more than $100 a day to do nothing. And it's driving some of them nuts.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal mediator said late Friday that labor unions were not going on strike at midnight against the Long Island Rail Road, the nation's busiest commuter railroad. Mediator Walter C. Wallace said that the deadline was extended at least until 6 a.m. today and he thought "there may be further extensions." LIRR President Bruce McIver said: "The current plan is to continue bargaining through the night. I'm still hopeful that there will be productive discussions."
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
A nationwide rail strike hobbled trains from the suburban express to the London-bound Eurostar on Thursday, leaving many French commuters stuck in traffic jams. The strike tops a week of traffic woes for the French. Bus and subway workers paralyzed dozens of major cities in strikes Monday through Wednesday. Paris was spared in the first job action but was hit hard Thursday, with suburban trains and long-distance and high-speed trains crippled.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A threatened nationwide Amtrak strike, triggered by a dispute over work rules at a Los Angeles Metrolink yard, was averted Tuesday when a U.S. District judge issued a temporary restraining order barring a walkout. Leaders of the United Transportation Union, which represents conductors, said they will comply with Judge Stanley Harris' court order, issued after a brief hearing in Washington.
NEWS
January 18, 1990
A strike by engineers has disrupted rail traffic in northwest Yugoslavia and delayed some international services, Tanjug news agency said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, moving to head off a rail strike that could hamper 500,000 Amtrak commuters throughout the Northeast, created a special three-member emergency board Thursday to investigate the labor dispute and draft a proposal for a settlement. The action was designed to buy more time for Amtrak and members of the Brotherhood of Maintenance-of-Way Employees union to work out their differences.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
A nearly 2-day-old strike at the nation's largest commuter railroad was settled Saturday night, officials announced. Long Island Rail Road trains are expected to be running on time for Monday morning's rush hour, Metropolitan Transportation Authority head Peter Stangl said. "There was no concession on the work rules and we paid the ransom," Stangl said. "I made the decision that I would pay the ransom before it got bad out there."
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motormen and conductors on Friday struck the Long Island Rail Road, the nation's busiest commuter line, forcing more than 103,000 weekday riders to scramble to find ways to reach work and idling 725 trains along 701 miles of track. Coming at the beginning of a weekend, many people simply elected to stay home. But officials feared that if the strike continued into next week, major traffic jams and hardships could occur. Gov. Mario M.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Negotiators for the Long Island Rail Road and the union representing track workers and conductors raced toward a Thursday midnight deadline for a walkout at the nation's largest commuter rail line. A strike would affect more than 100,000 commuters. Negotiators had said previously that some progress was made, prompting the 2,300-member United Transportation Union to delay its original midnight Wednesday strike deadline by 24 hours.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A threatened nationwide Amtrak strike, triggered by a dispute over work rules at a Los Angeles Metrolink yard, was averted Tuesday when a U.S. District judge issued a temporary restraining order barring a walkout. Leaders of the United Transportation Union, which represents conductors, said they will comply with Judge Stanley Harris' court order, issued after a brief hearing in Washington.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Orange County commuters who were forced to switch to buses, vans and cars during the nationwide rail strike climbed back on their trains Friday after Congress ordered rail employees back to work. "I had the car all to myself, it was great," said banker Jim McWalters, 47, of Placentia, after arriving at the Amtrak station Friday evening. "There was no baby screaming, no teen-agers running up and down the train."
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The labor dispute that produced Wednesday's nationwide rail strike is a complex tangle of collective bargaining issues, made more acrimonious by the fact that the strikers have worked without a contract--and thus without a pay raise--for three years. Compared to most industrial workers, railroad employees are well paid, making an average wage of about $40,000. At stake, however, is more than money.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
It is time for Congress to end the deception that management and labor in the railroad industry have the same freedom that the rest of private industry has to negotiate contracts, including the freedom to strike. And it is also time for the railroad industry to stop pretending that featherbedding is a massive abomination that is killing it. Let's first look at the legal fiction that a major freight rail strike is possible if management and the unions are unable to agree on a contract.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Congress and the White House moved with rare speed Thursday night to end a crippling two-day nationwide rail shutdown that already had begun to threaten the economy by forcing layoffs at coal mines and auto assembly plants. The House and Senate passed emergency legislation barring strikes and lockouts by large margins, setting up a "last, best offer" arbitration system to resolve the three major union-management disputes that had idled virtually all U.S. railroads.
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