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Railroad Workers Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
May 27, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Talks to resolve Poland's week-old railway strike collapsed, ending prospects for a settlement before today's local elections. Signs of an accord emerged briefly when workers unblocked several rail lines and strike leaders from the coastal city of Slupsk entered negotiations with the government. But strikers abandoned the talks when the government refused to discuss their pay demands, the official news agency PAP said. Today's balloting is for 48,000 seats in local government.
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NEWS
July 19, 1991 | Associated Press
A presidential emergency board Thursday ruled against rail unions on all issues that had led them to halt freight traffic with a strike three months ago. Under the law, the nation's unions have to live with the emergency board's settlement and cannot wage another strike. "They've taken us to the cleaners," said Larry McFather, president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
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NEWS
April 18, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The labor dispute that produced Wednesday's nationwide rail strike is a complex tangle of collective bargaining issues, made more acrimonious by the fact that the strikers have worked without a contract--and thus without a pay raise--for three years. Compared to most industrial workers, railroad employees are well paid, making an average wage of about $40,000. At stake, however, is more than money.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The labor dispute that produced Wednesday's nationwide rail strike is a complex tangle of collective bargaining issues, made more acrimonious by the fact that the strikers have worked without a contract--and thus without a pay raise--for three years. Compared to most industrial workers, railroad employees are well paid, making an average wage of about $40,000. At stake, however, is more than money.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | Associated Press
A presidential emergency board Thursday ruled against rail unions on all issues that had led them to halt freight traffic with a strike three months ago. Under the law, the nation's unions have to live with the emergency board's settlement and cannot wage another strike. "They've taken us to the cleaners," said Larry McFather, president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A presidential emergency board trying to head off a national rail strike recommended that railroad workers get annual bonuses but also start contributing for health care. As much as half of the workers' bonuses might have to go for health care contributions, according to recommendations for settling a two-year-old contract dispute between the nation's largest freight railroads and 11 unions representing about 200,000 workers.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
When President Bush said the other day that a railroad strike "could severely disrupt the economy" and prolong the recession, it may have come as a surprise to many Americans that railroads were still so important. Yet the fact is, railroads still haul most of the nation's coal, lumber, chemicals, paper and food products, as well as most of the automobiles--which travel most of the way from factory to dealer by rail. Railroads are also responsible for commuter services in many major cities.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
When President Bush said the other day that a railroad strike "could severely disrupt the economy" and prolong the recession, it may have come as a surprise to many Americans that railroads were still so important. Yet the fact is, railroads still haul most of the nation's coal, lumber, chemicals, paper and food products, as well as most of the automobiles--which travel most of the way from factory to dealer by rail. Railroads are also responsible for commuter services in many major cities.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A presidential emergency board trying to head off a national rail strike recommended that railroad workers get annual bonuses but also start contributing for health care. As much as half of the workers' bonuses might have to go for health care contributions, according to recommendations for settling a two-year-old contract dispute between the nation's largest freight railroads and 11 unions representing about 200,000 workers.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Talks to resolve Poland's week-old railway strike collapsed, ending prospects for a settlement before today's local elections. Signs of an accord emerged briefly when workers unblocked several rail lines and strike leaders from the coastal city of Slupsk entered negotiations with the government. But strikers abandoned the talks when the government refused to discuss their pay demands, the official news agency PAP said. Today's balloting is for 48,000 seats in local government.
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