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March 3, 1994 | Associated Press
Armenia's only rail supply link was cut early Wednesday when an explosion seriously damaged a bridge in a region of Georgia populated mainly by ethnic Azerbaijanis. The bomb went off along a 70-yard-long bridge in Georgia's Marneulsky region, the country's Interior Ministry reported. The region lies in the Caucasus Mountains near the Armenian border. "Now we are totally cut off from the rest of the world," Armenian government spokesman Vladimir Manoian said.
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NEWS
March 3, 1994 | Associated Press
Armenia's only rail supply link was cut early Wednesday when an explosion seriously damaged a bridge in a region of Georgia populated mainly by ethnic Azerbaijanis. The bomb went off along a 70-yard-long bridge in Georgia's Marneulsky region, the country's Interior Ministry reported. The region lies in the Caucasus Mountains near the Armenian border. "Now we are totally cut off from the rest of the world," Armenian government spokesman Vladimir Manoian said.
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NEWS
October 2, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev today called on the Soviet Legislature to impose a 15-month ban on strikes he says are wrecking the economy. The official Tass press agency said Gorbachev spoke at the end of a stormy two-hour legislative debate on a proposal for emergency economic measures put forward by First Deputy Premier Lev Voronin. Gorbachev said a ban on strikes is a "necessary measure . . . to protect democratization from anarchy and irresponsible management."
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawmakers today handed President Mikhail S. Gorbachev a rare defeat, rejecting his plea for an emergency ban on strikes that he warns could destroy the ravaged Soviet economy. The Soviet legislature instead imposed a selective ban on strikes in key economic areas. Gorbachev said that he is satisfied with the compromise and that it will "help restore a normal life." "This is a decision in support of perestroika, " he said.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad station where trains used to whistle by with food and other precious cargo is ghostly quiet. Somewhere over the brown hills of Azerbaijan, which rise just beyond this grape-growing village, thousands of Armenia-bound rail cars have screeched to an unscheduled halt. In its moment of national liberation, land-locked Armenia must scramble just to survive. "When they close down the railroads, Armenia gets nothing," said Babken Araktyan, the deputy chairman of Armenia's Parliament.
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