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NEWS
October 5, 1989
Canada will cut its leading passenger train service in half next year as a money-saving measure, officials said. The announcement by Transport Minister Benoit Bouchard upset opposition lawmakers, who said it means the death of the government-run service known as Via Rail. Bouchard said the cuts will allow the government to reduce its annual Via Rail subsidies, now at $640 million, to $350 million by 1993.
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NEWS
October 5, 1989
Canada will cut its leading passenger train service in half next year as a money-saving measure, officials said. The announcement by Transport Minister Benoit Bouchard upset opposition lawmakers, who said it means the death of the government-run service known as Via Rail. Bouchard said the cuts will allow the government to reduce its annual Via Rail subsidies, now at $640 million, to $350 million by 1993.
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NEWS
August 25, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Canadian freight and passenger train service was halted Monday when 48,000 workers struck the country's two national railroads after federally mediated negotiations failed to settle a dispute over pay and job security. The workers, representing nine unions, went on strike against the government-owned Canadian National Railways and the privately owned CP Rail. It was the first national railway strike in 14 years.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Canadian freight and passenger train service was halted Monday when 48,000 workers struck the country's two national railroads after federally mediated negotiations failed to settle a dispute over pay and job security. The workers, representing nine unions, went on strike against the government-owned Canadian National Railways and the privately owned CP Rail. It was the first national railway strike in 14 years.
TRAVEL
August 4, 1996 | MARGO PFEIFF, Pfeiff is a Montreal-based freelance writer and photographer
The Little Bear train is already three hours late by the time we pull out of Ontario Northland station in Cochrane, a small town roughly 300 miles north of Toronto. But nobody really minds. My traveling companions are teachers, students and families on their way home after summer vacation in southern Ontario, and there is a homey atmosphere on board with much hugging and excited chatter over endless cups of coffee. It's not surprising that I'm here.
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